Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Return On Contribution (ROC)   ECSCW 2009   Muller Et Al
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Return On Contribution (ROC) ECSCW 2009 Muller Et Al

963

Published on

We desribe Return On Contribution (ROC), a social metric for social software. ROC can be used to characterize social software at the level of (a) an application, (b) types of contributions, (c) …

We desribe Return On Contribution (ROC), a social metric for social software. ROC can be used to characterize social software at the level of (a) an application, (b) types of contributions, (c) particular contributions, and (d) particular contributors (where permitted by privacy rules). Our work also highlights the importance of "lurkers" or "non-public participants" in social software. ROC can be applied across diverse types of social software and forms of participation.

Published in: Spiritual, Technology
1 Comment
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
963
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
19
Comments
1
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Return On Contribution (ROC): A Metric for Enterprise Social Software Michael Muller, Jill Freyne*, Casey Dugan, David R Millen, & Jennifer Thom-Santelli IBM Research & IBM Center for Social Software Cambridge MA USA *Jill Freyne is now at Tasmanian ICT Center, CSIRO, Australia 1
  • 2. Agenda • How to measure the benefits of social software in organizations? • Return On Contribution (ROC) • Applying ROC to – Enterprise social software applications – Types of resources in social software applications – Points of articulation in social software applications – Individual users (with a few notes on privacy) • Conclusion and Next Steps 2
  • 3. Benefits of Social Software • Informal arguments are known – Better knowledge-sharing – Better personal effectiveness – Improved ability to manage one’s reputation – In organizations, better satisfaction and retention • There are few strong studies to support those claims • Management’s desire: Return On Investment – Has been shown for niche social software applications • Customer-support operations • Customer communities – Has been shown for advertising opportunities • Social networking sites 3
  • 4. Return On … What? • Return On Investment – ROI = Benefit / Cost € / € (unitless economic ratio) – We hope for ROI >> 1.0 • Social software benefits – and even costs – are difficult to measure – Is the purpose of social software to increase productivity? – How do you calculate ROI of a telephone? an IM product? – How do you calculate ROI of a relationship? 4
  • 5. Return On Contribution (ROC) • A social ratio – ROI = € / € – ROI = Benefit / Cost – ROC = Beneficiaries / Contributors (unitless social ratio) = Consumers / Producers • Return On Contribution – A measure of social effectiveness – do more people benefit (or consume) than contribute (or produce)? – Rational Choice theory (Pirolli, 2007) • Over time, people’s work-oriented decisions are beneficial to them • Measure those choices and summarize them as a metric 5
  • 6. ROC for Two Enterprise Services • Dogear • Beehive – “Social bookmarking – “Social networking behind the firewall” behind the firewa – Overall usage – Overall usagell” – Common goods – Common goods • Bookmarks • Photos • Tags • Lists (HiveFives) • Events • (Person-summaries) • (Person-summaries) 6
  • 7. ROC for Two Enterprise Services • Dogear • Beehive – “Social bookmarking – “Social networking behind the firewall” behind the firewall” – Overall usage – Overall usage – Common goods – Common goods • Bookmarks • Photos • Tags • Lists (HiveFives) • Events • (Person-summaries) • (Person-summaries) 7
  • 8. ROC for Two Enterprise Services • Dogear • Beehive – “Social bookmarking – “Social networking behind the firewall” behind the firewall” – Overall usage – Overall usage – Common goods – Common goods • Bookmarks • Photos • Tags • Lists (HiveFives) • Events • (Person-summaries) • (Person-summaries) 8
  • 9. ROC for Two Enterprise Services • Dogear • Beehive 9
  • 10. ROC for Two Enterprise Services • Dogear • Beehive 10
  • 11. ROC for Types of Contributions • Dogear • Beehive – “Social bookmarking – “Social networking behind the firewall” behind the firewall” – Overall usage – Overall usage – Common goods – Common goods • Bookmarks • Photos • Tags • Lists (HiveFives) • Events • (Person-summaries) • (Person-summaries) 11
  • 12. ROC for Types of Contributions • Dogear • Beehive – “Social bookmarking – “Social networking Monthly Social-Networking ROC for three media types behind the firewall” 20 18 behind the firewall” Photo List – Overall usage 16 14 – Overall usage Event 12 – Common goods – Common goods ROCC 10 Data range of Figure 1 8 • Bookmarks 6 • Photos • Tags 4 2 • Lists (HiveFives) 0 Jun-07 • Jul-07 Events Aug-07 Sep-07 Oct-07 Nov-07 Dec-07 Jan-08 Date • (Person-summaries) • (Person-summaries) 12
  • 13. ROC for Specific Contributions • Dogear • Beehive – “Social bookmarking – “Social networking behind the firewall” behind the firewall” – Overall usage – Overall usage – Common goods – Common goods • Bookmarks • Photos • Tags – specific tags • Lists (HiveFives) • Events • (Person-summaries) • (Person-summaries) 13
  • 14. ROC for Specific Contributions • Dogear • Beehive – “Social bookmarking – “Social networking behind the firewall” behind the firewall” – Overall usage – Overall usage – Common goods – Common goods • Bookmarks • Photos • Tags – specific tags Tagging• for audiences (Thom-Santelli Lists (HiveFives) et al., 2008) • Events • Publishers • (Person-summaries) • (Person-summaries) • Evangelists 14
  • 15. ROC for Specific Contributions • Dogear • Beehive – “Social bookmarking – “Social networking behind the firewall” behind the firewall” – Overall usage – Overall usage – Common goods – Common goods • Bookmarks • Photos • Tags – specific tags • Lists (HiveFives) – Publisher: podcast tag “Tag-City” • Events Tag ROC = 7.41 readers/contributor – Personal ROC = 63.00 • (Person-summaries) – Evangelist: tag “web2.0” Tag ROC = 1.95 readers/contributor – Personal ROC = 1245.00 • (Person-summaries) 15
  • 16. ROC for Specific Contributions • Dogear • Beehive – “Social bookmarking – “Social networking behind the firewall” behind the firewall” – Overall usage – Overall usage – Common goods – Common goods • Bookmarks • Photos • Tags – specific tags • Lists (HiveFives) – Publisher: podcast tag “Tag-City” • Events Tag ROC = 7.41 readers/contributor – Personal ROC = 63.00 • (Person-summaries) – Evangelist: tag “web2.0” Tag ROC = 1.95 readers/contributor – Personal ROC = 1245.00 • (Person-summaries) 16
  • 17. ROC for Other Social Applications Service Beneficiaries Contributors ROC C Dogear 10896 4213 2.59 Beehive 21453 8397 2.55 Wiki server 238838 36377 6.57 Discussion server 150000 23000 6.52 Person-tagging 20973 3102 6.76 File-sharing 68762 11276 6.19 17
  • 18. Implications for Design or Potential Use • Track the development of organizational value of an application over time – Does it increase? Does it stabilize? • Compare the organizational value of different types of contributions over time • Compare the organizational value of specific contribution instances • Assist the development of individual contributors, especially in assigned roles such as “evangelist” or “publisher”, by providing private views of her/his personal ROC • Monitor, on an anonymous basis, the development of social capital through aggregate, summary ROC measures across all beneficiaries and contributors 18
  • 19. Unanswered Questions about ROC • Are there characteristic “signature” ROC values for different types of applications? • How to determine “stabilization” of ROC over time? • What should the “target” ROC be for a discussion forum? – ROC >> 6.0 for some applications looked very nice – However, ROC=1.0 suggests full democratic participation – When are different values of ROC desirable? • What should the “target” ROC be for a type of object, or a particular object (e.g., a tag)? • Can ROC help to show the value of “lurkers”? When is it permissible (under privacy rules) to study “lurking”? 19
  • 20. Summary of Contributions • Lurkers as non-public participants (Nonnecke and Preece, 2001) and as altruists (Takahashi et al., 2003) – Employees in some jobs are “paid to lurk” – Lurkers’ “consumption” of shared objects is a test of the organizational value of those objects • ROC provides a “social value” metric for – Social software applications (Dogear, Beehive) – Types of contributions (Photos, Lists, Events in Beehive) – Specific contributions (Tags in Dogear) – (where permitted) specific contributors (Taggers in Dogear) • ROC can help organizations and researchers to assess and study the value of social media 20
  • 21. Thank you! Slides may be found on slideshare.net michael_muller@us.ibm.com 21
  • 22. ROC for Two Enterprise Services • Dogear • Beehive 22
  • 23. ROC for Two Enterprise Services • Dogear • Beehive Two ways to think about benefit • All users (including contributors) ROC C = AllUsers/Contributors • Lurkers only ROC L = Lurkers/Contributors 23
  • 24. ROC C and ROC L • Dogear • Beehive Two ways to think about benefit • All users (including contributors) ROC C = AllUsers/Contributors • Lurkers only ROC L = Lurkers/Contributors 24
  • 25. ROC for Two Enterprise Services • Dogear • Beehive 25

×