Information Curators in an Enterprise File-Sharing Service
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Information Curators in an Enterprise File-Sharing Service

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We describe an emergent role in an enterprise social file-sharing service, in which users create collections of files for use by themselves or other users. We call these users "information curators."

We describe an emergent role in an enterprise social file-sharing service, in which users create collections of files for use by themselves or other users. We call these users "information curators."

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Information Curators in an Enterprise File-Sharing Service Information Curators in an Enterprise File-Sharing Service Presentation Transcript

  • Information Curators in an Enterprise File-Sharing Service Michael Muller, David R Millen, & Jonathan Feinberg IBM Research & IBM Center for Social Software Cambridge MA USA 1
  • Agenda • Cattail, an enterprise file-sharing service – Tools for sharing files • Quantitative analysis: Collections are interesting! • Qualitative analysis: What do Collectors do? – Information Curators • Related work Implications for design 2
  • Cattail for Enterprise File-Sharing A F • Upload a file A • Download a file B B • Share a file with C other user(s) C D – Provide access – Notify G E B • Collect a file into a D named Collection H • Annotate a file E • Search for files F • View other users’ histories G P • Track a file’s usage H Q 3 View slide
  • Cattail for Enterprise File-Sharing A F • Upload a file A • Download a file B B • Share a file with C other user(s) C D – Provide access 5444 users (6.2%) created – Notify G E 12461 collections comprising B B • Collect a file into a D 60476 files (50% of files) named Collection H • Annotate a file E • Search for files F • View other users’ histories G P • Track a file’s usage H Q 4 View slide
  • What Do Collectors Do? • Whom to ask – 100 most-frequent Collectors • 22 countries (27%) – Select 22 informants • 16 countries (20%) • Gender balance (36% women, 64% men) • Diverse job titles (sales, consulting, operations, architecture, management, communications, design) • How to ask – 1-hour interview via instant messaging – Topics • motivation, goals, presentation, use of others’ collections – 5 coding iterations 5
  • Individual and Shared Work • “easier for myself and others to find the content again… a more active way of sharing” (Informant 11, internal communications, Austria) • “a knowledge package…. to summarize … mixed knowledges [with others]” (I8, consultant, Turkey) • “group them in a neat bundle to shove it at people” (I9, project management, UK) 6
  • Semi-Structured Work Practices • “1. organizing files… 2. finding files I use most often (either my own or those of the people i [work with]… 3. sharing files…” (I22, sales, USA) • “…a master report, and an updated report for every member of my department…. 31 [downloaders]... 20 [uploaders] …. I open a new collection every week…” (I2, supply chain specialist, Mexico) 7
  • Curators & their Audiences • “regular collections with manually selected / curated resources…. trying to help people (and myself!) make sense of the files that are available” (I15, enterprise 2.0 evangelist, Canada) • “a kind of editor, you share you own and other useful info via collections” (I18, sales, Finland) • “put some structure around the content I collect/create around my topic… what is good for me is good for my readers ☺” (I19, product manager, France) 8
  • Framing Collections for Others’ Usage • “very short descriptions… the intent of the collection – so I can keep the collection name really short!” (I9, project management, UK) • “sometimes I used the [descriptive field] to link to other related content [cross] reference” (I19, product manager, France) • “i asked everyone to use the naming convention, and I enforced it” (I22, sales, USA). 9
  • Current and Future Shared Usage • Formal requirements – “audit [can] go in on a monthly basis so that they can test to see if the necessary billing approvals exist.” (I4, business operations, UK) • Customer relationship management – “an asset for the future opportunities about the client” (I8, consultant, Turkey) • Leaving a record for others – “It’s a fail safe if I was knocked down by a bus!” (I4, business operations, UK) 10
  • Summary and Comparisons • Quantitative analyses – Collections and Collecting are major aspects of Cattail use • Qualitative analyses – Use of Collections by Information Curators to • Find and refind content for self or others • Support formal and informal work practices – current and future • Prepare and comunicate knowledge packages for self and others • Other forms of curating – Blogging as “digital curating” (Rubel, 2009) • Cattail users often have targeted or known audiences – Tagging as a kind of curating (Thom-Santelli et al., 2008) • Tag provides informal link to “collection” of URLs – Bietz & Lee (ECSCW 2009): collecting genomic sequences 11
  • Related Work Organizational file-sharing • Architectures – Peer-to-peer – Centralized • Organizational services – UD Dropbox (Schwartz, 2007) - Centralized – Apocrita (Reynolds et al., 2005) – Peer-to-peer – We are hoping to see research reports from these projects! 12
  • Implications for Design Person-centered views Sharing-histories (Voida et al., 2006; Whalen et al., 2008) Notifications of sharing (Voida et al., 2006) Artifact-centered view (Whalen et al., 2008) Developing the collection – No way to track views on a collection collection-centered view – Comments and discussions on the collection as-a-whole Developing the audience (Thom-Santelli et al., 2008) – Group-centered view (Bellotti, 1996; Voida et al., 2006) – How did people find the collection? – How else can we help the users of collections? Design to facilitate users as (co-)inventors of new work practices, features, and technologies (Muller et al., 2005) 13
  • Thank you! Slides may be found on slideshare.net michael_muller@us.ibm.com 14
  • File-Sharing – a site for Appropriation • Re-invention or appropriation – While adopting a new technology, uses also adapt it (Muller et al., 2005) – Users transform a technology through use – Lead-users (Franke et al., 2006) – Users as post-implementation designers (Kujala & Kauppinen, 2004) • Enterprise perspective – Understand users’ work practices in depth – “Harvest” user innovations into new features 15
  • 16
  • Cattail Statistics • Users by actions – All users 88270 – Uploaders 15934 – Downloaders 85707 – Sharers 12584 – Collectors 5444 – Annotators 3884 • Collective goods – Files 120288 – Collections 12461 – Annotations 8828 17
  • Collection Statistics • Users by actions • Collections – All users 88270 – Collectors 5444 – Uploaders 15934 (6.2%) – Downloaders 85707 – Collections 12461 – Sharers 12584 – Collected files 60476 – Collectors 5444 (50%) – Annotators 3884 • Collective goods – Files 120288 – Collections 12461 – Annotations 8828 18