Aug 28, 2008 Evolution of BA IIBA Webinar

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Aug 28, 2008 Evolution of BA IIBA Webinar

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  • Kathleen Barret is the first and current President of the International Institute of Business Analysis, a professional association for Business Analysts. To support her passion for business analysis, Kathleen works at BMO Financial Group as Program Manager for the offshore software development group. She is here today to share her perspective on the history and future direction of the business analysis profession.
  • Kathleen Barret is the first and current President of the International Institute of Business Analysis, a professional association for Business Analysts. To support her passion for business analysis, Kathleen works at BMO Financial Group as Program Manager for the offshore software development group. She is here today to share her perspective on the history and future direction of the business analysis profession.
  • I think a hero is an ordinary individual who finds strength to persevere and endure in spite of overwhelming obstacles Christopher Reeve
  • What's happening with business analysis?  Is the CBAP® becoming accepted?  What about BA centers of competency?  If the profession is becoming mainstreamed within large organizations why?  Does this mean that development is more likely to be outsourced? Is it being driven by increased purchase of COTS stuff? What about tools? Business Architecture (understand and codify the business - top down, bubbles chart) vs Business Analysis - connecting the two disciplines Business domain to system requirements Client perspective on topic of requirements - as a client Can't get clients to articulate requirements very well Best practices for service provider if they want to get good requirements - what should a service provider As a representative / thought leader of the BA community Business Architecture (understand and codify the business - top down, bubbles chart) vs Business Analysis - connecting the two disciplines Business domain to system requirements
  • Information Technology Increase spend is both a cost of doing business and a competitive advantage IT needs to be operationally efficient – standardize, embrace best practices / tools, eliminate waste, focus on what is important IT becomes a tool to position the organization strategically Global Economy Including NAFTA Resources can be acquired relatively easily at reasonable prices Competitors are everywhere – both local and across the globe Integrated organizations LOBs – vertical Focus on the customer Process, products, infrastructure – horizontal Reuse assets Just in time Delivery Can’t afford mistakes that impact time to market Bad press – reputational risk for public failure Right-sourcing Core Competencies Global Supply chain Role of Technology no longer an inhibitor Not if, it’s how
  • Key Message: It costs money when you get it wrong! Mistakes: Coke (1886): Coke did not understand their customer needs when Pepsi started the Taste Challenge. They did not ask the right questions. They created New Coke. Oops. Schwinn (1895): Did not recognize their customer need – for mountain bikes – and they went bankrupt in 1993. Apple (1980’s): Did not understand their market (did not license their products to 3 rd parties). Almost disappeared. Look at them today. Have founded their empire on understanding their customers better than anyone else. Overrun many existing players in the MP3 market. In many ways, they made the market. Star performer Disney Lands’ End Monster.com ~
  • Key Message: so what is BA? Not about documentation / capturing requirements It is about the business
  • Process- not the people
  • Key Message: the BOK in a bit more detail
  • Key message: what is the BA? 145 BA positions listed in BMO BA Positions listed:  Workopolis – over 500 with the specific title BA/Business Analyst – Senior, Intermediate, etc. Across Canada – slightly less than half from Toronto and surrounding areas Monster.ca has 432 across Canada – again mostly (2/3+) with specifically BA type titles…in English and French Monster.com has 4264 across the U.S.
  • Key message: many skills and competencies required of a BA. Breadth and depth will be dependent on your organization Competency knowledge, ability, or expertise in a specific subject area or skill set Skill Something that can be demonstrated; learned technique Roles Analyst / Problem Solver Facilitator Negotiator Artist / Architect Planner Communicator Diplomat Expert / Consultant Strategist Revolutionary
  • Key message: challenge to leap from tactical to strategic
  • Key message: one size does not fit all and it will not ever
  • Key message: role will continue to develop and specialize along 3 axis IT market driving formalization of BA role Cost of failure very high Relatively new role – least mature – other industries / functions have been getting by without formalizing the role Other clearly defined roles within IT – PM, Dev, Tester, architect… Reason why BA BOK had an IT focus – huge need from IT industry Reason why BAs from IT becoming certified before BAs from other areas Rest of marketplace is specialist – e.g., product manager, process engineer, marketing, facilitator Current BOK, because limited focus, does not address the needs of hybrid role – one which combines knowledge from a variety of roles Future BOK will become more robust at the generalist level but also begin to develop / describe areas of specialization
  • Need for BAs = f(maturity, size, diversity)
  • Aug 28, 2008 Evolution of BA IIBA Webinar

    1. 1. International Institute of Business Analysis The Evolving Role of the Business Analyst August 2008
    2. 2. International Institute of Business Analysis The Evolving Role of the Business Analyst August 2008
    3. 3. Our Sponsor – Forte Solutions Group <ul><li>The IIBA ™ would like to thank  Forte Solutions Group for sponsoring our first webinar </li></ul>www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis With more than 40-years of cumulative experience, Forte Solutions Group is a unique boutique consulting firm specializing in Business Analysis and Initiative Management for Strategic and Project-based initiatives for Commercial and Government sector clients.
    4. 4. International Institute of Business Analysis The Evolving Role of the Business Analyst : Our Next Super Hero! August 2008
    5. 5. Discussion Points <ul><li>Why Now – the case for Business Analysis? </li></ul><ul><li>Who is the Business Analyst? </li></ul><ul><li>Where is the Profession Heading? </li></ul><ul><li>What does it mean to you? </li></ul>www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis
    6. 6. Why Now? <ul><li>The Case for Business Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Global Economy – resources, competition </li></ul><ul><li>Right-sourcing – core competencies, supply chain </li></ul><ul><li>Integrated Organizations – focus on customer </li></ul><ul><li>Just-in-time delivery – no mistakes, reputation </li></ul><ul><li>Information Technology Spend – operational, strategic, demographic </li></ul><ul><li>Role of Technology – can do anything </li></ul>www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis
    7. 7. Why Now? www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis <ul><li>For many years, organizations have been designing solutions without a clear understanding of the market need, often with many assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>Success was hit or miss although the cost of a miss was survivable </li></ul><ul><li>With the global economy, increased competition and the availability of many alternatives, consumers have come to expect more - and can choose from a variety of alternatives </li></ul><ul><li>The impacts of a mistake can now be very costly </li></ul>The Case for Business Analysis
    8. 8. Why Now? <ul><li>When the delivery does not meet expectation </li></ul>www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis
    9. 9. It’s about the Deliverable www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis In the beginning… Build Implement Planning Late & Expensive Missing Piece But it is …
    10. 10. It’s about the Deliverable www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis Some Progress was made… Build Implement Testing Poor Quality Missing Piece Plan But it still has …
    11. 11. It’s about the Deliverable www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis Filled in another hole … Build Implement Definition of need Doesn’t solve the problem Missing Piece Plan Test But it still …
    12. 12. It’s about the Deliverable www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis Addressed a BIG gap… Build Implement Plan Test Define Doesn’t Quite fit But it still … The Big Picture Missing Piece
    13. 13. It’s about the Deliverable www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis Et Voilà! … Build Implement Plan Test Describe Define
    14. 14. What is Describe and Define? <ul><li>How an organization works? </li></ul><ul><li>Why the organization exists? </li></ul><ul><li>What are its goals and objectives? </li></ul><ul><li>How does it accomplish those objectives? </li></ul><ul><li>How does it need to change to better accomplish those objectives or to meet new challenges? </li></ul><ul><li>It is about defining the scope of solutions </li></ul>www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis Describe Define It is about Business Analysis!
    15. 15. What is Business Analysis? www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis The set of tasks, knowledge, & techniques required to identify business needs & determine solutions to business problems. Solutions often include a systems development component, but may also consist of process improvement or organizational change. Business Analysis Body of Knowledge ®
    16. 16. What is Business Analysis? www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis Business Analysis Body of Knowledge ® (BABOK ® ) Knowledge Areas Purpose Business Analysis Planning & Monitoring Determine what we need to do Enterprise Analysis Understand the business problem & scope of possible solutions Elicitation Find out what the real needs of our stakeholders are Requirements Analysis Describe the characteristics & qualities of the solution the meets the stakeholder needs Solutions Assessment & Validation Determine whether a particular solution is right for our stakeholders Requirements Management & Communications Ensure that stakeholders agree on what needs to be delivered
    17. 17. Business Analysis Professional <ul><li>The Definition </li></ul><ul><li>Works as a liaison among stakeholders to elicit, analyze, communicate and validate requirements for changes to business processes, policies, and information and information systems </li></ul><ul><li>Understands business problems and opportunities in the context of the requirements and recommends solutions that enable the organization to achieve its goals </li></ul>www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis Possible revision in BABOK ® V2 Business analysis is the set of tasks and techniques used to work as a liaison among stakeholders in order to understand the structure, policies, and operations of an organization, and recommend solutions in order to enable that organization to achieve its goals
    18. 18. Business Analysis Professional www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis Communication Analysis Implementation Skills Consulting Domain Knowledge <ul><li>Facilitation </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiation </li></ul><ul><li>Conflict Management </li></ul><ul><li>Formal (presentation, documentation) </li></ul><ul><li>Logic </li></ul><ul><li>Decision Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Process & Data Modeling </li></ul><ul><li>Systems Thinking </li></ul><ul><li>Relationship Management </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Coaching Skills </li></ul><ul><li>Delegation and Management Skills </li></ul><ul><li>IT Knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Process Change </li></ul><ul><li>Organizational Change </li></ul><ul><li>Quality Assurance </li></ul><ul><li>Project Management </li></ul><ul><li>Products </li></ul><ul><li>Processes </li></ul><ul><li>Markets </li></ul><ul><li>Systems </li></ul>Core Competencies
    19. 19. Business Analysis Professional <ul><li>Performs many roles </li></ul><ul><li>Analyst </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitator </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiator </li></ul><ul><li>Artist / Architect </li></ul><ul><li>Planner </li></ul><ul><li>Communicator </li></ul><ul><li>Diplomat </li></ul><ul><li>Expert / Consultant </li></ul><ul><li>Strategist </li></ul><ul><li>Revolutionary </li></ul>www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis
    20. 20. Business Analysis Superheroes! www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis Truth Understood the Need Agile Negotiation Right on target
    21. 21. Business Analysis Professional www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis Knowledge Continuum Maturity Skill Tactical Strategic
    22. 22. Business Analysis Professional www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis Practitioner is a “jack of all trades”, performing multiple roles e.g., business analyst, project manager, tester, etc. Practitioner possesses solid or advanced business subject matter expertise e.g., capital markets Hybrid Practitioner SME or Domain Practitioner Consulting Practitioner Current Flavours Practitioner possesses solid or advanced skills in the enterprise knowledge areas e.g., process, strategy business casing Generalists
    23. 23. Where is the BA Profession Heading? www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis <ul><li>Finance </li></ul><ul><li>Consumer Products </li></ul><ul><li>Energy </li></ul><ul><li>Manufacturing </li></ul><ul><li>Construction </li></ul><ul><li>Others …. </li></ul><ul><li>Product </li></ul><ul><li>Software </li></ul><ul><li>Infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Others … </li></ul><ul><li>Process </li></ul><ul><li>Data </li></ul><ul><li>Elicitation </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiation </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Others … </li></ul>Industry Function Competency <ul><li>The profession will mature along three axis </li></ul><ul><li>Industry </li></ul><ul><li>Competency </li></ul><ul><li>Function </li></ul>The Developing Marketplace
    24. 24. Where is the BA Profession Heading? www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis Centre of Excellence “ Strategic Alignment” Community of Practice “ Support” BA Bureau “ Maturity”
    25. 25. Where is the BA Profession Heading? www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis Framework Environment Resources Business Alignment Standards & Methodologies Organization & structure Competency/ career development Enterprise Analysis Metrics Governance Training & dev Customer relationships Tools Assessment Team dev Virtual… Knowledge Management
    26. 26. Where is the BA Profession Heading? www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis Age of Product Lines Marketplace Stability Competition Number of Employees Geographic Dispersion Number of Product Lines Marketplace Uniformity <ul><li>Established product lines & stable markets require limited business analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Competitive and developing markets have a critical need for highly experienced generalists and specialists in the competency domain (e.g., strategic, marketplace analysis) </li></ul><ul><li>Larger organizations can support higher levels of specialization </li></ul><ul><li>Smaller organizations may be more dependent on generalists and hybrid BAs (i.e., possess knowledge across multiple professional domains) </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple product lines may require a combination of generalists and highly specialized individuals </li></ul><ul><li>Highly specialized industries or niche markets will require specialists </li></ul>MATURITY SIZE DIVERSITY Organizations need for BAs =  (maturity, size, diversity)
    27. 27. In Conclusion <ul><li>Demand for BA role is growing because organizations recognize that building a solution is not sufficient – they must understand the needs first </li></ul><ul><li>The BA profession will develop along three axis </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Industry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Function </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Competency </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Demand for greater specialization will grow as understanding of the value of the BA and formalization of the role continue </li></ul><ul><li>Organizations must understand need to determine the type and maturity of BA required </li></ul>www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis
    28. 28. www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis
    29. 29. Next Webinar: September 16, 2008 <ul><li>Understanding the Certified Business Analysis Professional ™ (CBAP ® ) Designation </li></ul><ul><li>Tuesday, September 16, 2008, 8:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. E.D.T. </li></ul><ul><li>Presented by Michael Gladstone, CBAP ® , IIBA Vice President, Certification and Chief Information Officer </li></ul><ul><li>Discussion points : </li></ul><ul><li>What is CBAP ® and what makes it unique? </li></ul><ul><li>The need for the CBAP ® designation in today’s business environment </li></ul><ul><li>CBAP ® application requirements </li></ul><ul><li>To register, go to the IIBA ™ Website at www.theiiba.org </li></ul>www.theiiba.org © 2008, International Institute of Business Analysis

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