Tools and measurement

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Tools and measurement

  1. 1. Chap 1 Sec 4Tools and Measurement
  2. 2. Tools• Volume – Graduated Cylinder, meter stick – Units: mL (liquid), cubed (solid)• Mass – triple beam balance – Units: kg (kilogram)• Length – meter stick – Unit: m (meter)• Force – spring scale – Units: N (Newton)
  3. 3. • Temperature – thermometer – Units: K (Kelvin) we use °C (Celsius)• Time – stopwatch – Units: sec (seconds)
  4. 4. SI – International System• SI: International system (metric) – used globally as a standard of measurement and units so that info can be shared accurately• Based on 10 making conversion of units easier• We do not measure in standard – EVER!!
  5. 5. Length• Measure of distance from one point to another – Units: (0fficial is m=meter) km, m, cm, mm
  6. 6. Area• Measure of the surface of an object• Formula: A=lxw• all answers must be squared units• m2, cm2, km2
  7. 7. Volume• the amount of space something occupies• Formula: V=lxwxh for a solid that you can physically measure• OR: water displacement, object is placed in water and the starting value is subtracted from the ending value – Units: cubed (for a solid) m3,cm3• Measured by displacement – Units: mL (mL is never cubed)• 1 mL=1cm3
  8. 8. Mass• The amount of matter that something is made of• Units: Official Kg - g, mg, cg
  9. 9. Density• Amount of matter in a given volume Formula: D=m/v• Units:• measured with water displacement – g/mL• Physically measured (solid) – g/cm 3• Density can not be measured directly, you must know (find) the mass and the volume to calculate
  10. 10. Temperature• The measure of how hot or cold something is (average kinetic energy of the objects particles)• Units: Official K (Kelvin) never °K, just K• We use: °C - Celsius

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