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Scenario Based Learning using Rapid eLearning Tools
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  • State: Here are our objectives for this session. We will begin the session by discussing how scenario based learning fits into adult learning theory. Then we will brainstorm ways to create scenario-based eLearning in a variety of rapid eLearning tools.
  • State: Here are our objectives for this session. We will begin the session by discussing how scenario based learning fits into adult learning theory. Then we will brainstorm ways to create scenario-based eLearning in a variety of rapid eLearning tools.
  • State: My name is Traci Weiss. I’ve been in the Learning and Development consulting field for just over 7 years. In that time I’ve worked in a variety of industries ranging from the restaurant industry to accounting and financial services. I had the opportunity to design and develop Instructor Led training, webcasts, and eLearning courses. I have designed and developed eLearning using Captivate, Articulate (utilizing engage & quizmaker), Lectora, Adobe Presenter and Raptivity.
  • State: I want to begin this presentation with these 6 adult learning principles. I have this information printed on a “job aid” and have it hung in my home office. I feel that it does a really good job of bringing the Adult Learning Principles to life. It’s also a great cheat sheet to use when working with SME’s. Adults have a need to know why they should learn something. Adults spend a considerable amount of time and energy exploring what the benefits are of them learning something and the costs of them not learning something before they are willing to invest time in learning it. It is seldom convincing for them to be told by someone (even the boss) that it would be good for them. Training should be based on valid needs of the intended audience. All information provided about the training, including lesson plans, should include reasons for learning. The benefits of learning should be clearly shown. Activities should be based around real work experiences. Adults have a deep need to be self-directing. The psychological definition of "adult" is one who has achieved a self-concept of being in charge of his or her own life, of being responsible for making his or her own decisions and living with the consequences. Adults develop a deep need to be seen by others as being capable of taking responsibility for themselves. Too often as trainers we design training situations that place adults back in their childhood where they are told what where and when and how to learn. Self-directed is not the same as self-paced. Self-paced means that the learner is only in charge of when to experience what the trainer has produced. Self-directed learning puts the learner in charge of much more. Incorporate as much "search and discovery" into the training as possible for experienced learners. Present training with as many options for learning as possible. Adults have a greater volume and different quality of experience than youth. Adults bring into the learning situation a background of experience that is a rich resource. Adults have a broader base of experience on which to attach new ideas and skills and give them richer meaning. The more explicit these relationships (between the old and the new) are made - through discussion and reflection - the deeper and more permanent the learning will be. Experience is to adults, the chief source of self-identity. If adults' experience is not made use of in a training experience, adults may see it as a rejection of themselves. Design training activities that reflect the actual work the learners perform. Provide activities that permit learners to compare the theoretical aspects of the training with their experiences. Adults become ready to learn when they experience in their life situations a need to know or be able to do in order to perform more effectively and satisfyingly. Some of the greatest goofs of training have occurred as a result of forcing people into training activities before they perceived a need for them. Adults again must see a need for training before learning will take place. Design training so that learners are solving problems or are performing tasks as close to those encountered back on the job as possible. When large amounts of information support the problem solving activities, present this information as reference material. Teach learners how to use the information to successfully complete the problem solving activities. Again, don't do an information dump. Focus activities on "doing" something with information rather than simply "knowing" the information. Adults enter into a learning experience with a task-centered (or problem-centered or life-centered) orientation to learning. Youth (conditioned by schools) have a subject-centered orientation to learning where they focus on learning content to pass a test. Adults by virtue of life and work experiences develop a task-centered or problem-centered orientation to learning. If training is developed around problem solving, then adults will learn content with the intention of using it. Design training so that learners are solving problems or are performing tasks as close to those encountered back on the job as possible. When large amounts of information support the problem solving activities, present this information as reference material. Teach learners how to use the information to successfully complete the problem solving activities. Again, don't do an information dump. Focus activities on "doing" something with information rather than simply "knowing" the information. Adults are motivated to learn by both extrinsic and intrinsic motivators. Adult learners respond to extrinsic motivators - promotion, bonuses, etc. - up to the point that they are reasonably well satisfied. But the more potent and persistent motivators are such intrinsic motivators as the need for self-esteem, broadened responsibilities, power, and achievement. And back to point one. Adults may not be motivated to learn what we tell them to learn unless they perceive a need to learn. Learning activities should clearly demonstrate to the learner where he or she would benefit in their jobs. Quality training is built around the concept of nourishing those intrinsic motivators. Learning feeds on itself and suggests to the learner to become even more proficient in the job.
  • State: In the last 3 years, I’ve had more and more clients request scenarios in their training. This is really exciting because I feel that it allows us to design and develop more impactful training. The more “real life” we can make the scenarios the more relevant our course is going to be. In traditional scenario based learning the learner is presented with real life situations. The learner is then prompted to respond to the situation. Learning takes place through the feedback the learner receives based on their choices throughout the scenario. If done the correct way, scenario based learning creates highly engaging and interactive courses, allowing the learner to become an active participant in the learning process. Scenario based learning is also great because it takes into account each aspect of adult learning theory.
  • State: This is is how traditional scenario based learning is designed. The learner is presented with a challenge. They are then given several choices. Specific feedback is given based on each answer choice. Learning takes place through trial and error and through the comprehensive feedback. Traditional scenario based learning (with little or no source content) takes about 120 ID design and development hours for every hour of eLearning.
  • State: I have yet to be in a position where I’ve been able to design traditional scenario based learning with branching. I have always been faced with constraints. Either the LMS or the eLearning platform can’t branch. Or there are time constraints and lack of SME involvement. What other constraints have you been faced with?
  • State: So how can we create scenario based learning when we are faced with those constraints? I think we can do our best to incorporate “real world” scenarios into the learning. The more we can bring the content to life, the better it’s going to be for our learners.
  • There were 3 major lessons in the course. 2 of the lessons had robust scenarios.
  • I worked with the a colleague to design this course. This project that gave me my first taste of scenario based learning.
  • There were 3 major lessons in the course. 2 of the lessons had robust scenarios.
  • There were 3 major lessons in the course. 2 of the lessons had robust scenarios.

Transcript

  • 1. Creating Scenario-Based Learning Using Rapid eLearning Tools Chicago eLearning & Technology Showcase August 16, 2011
  • 2. Objectives
    • By the end of this session, you should be able to:
      • Discuss how scenario based learning fits into adult learning theory.
      • Identify ways to create scenario-based eLearning in a variety of rapid eLearning tools given client constraints.
  • 3. Agenda
    • Introduction
    • How scenario based learning fits into Adult Learning Theory
    • Design challenges with scenario based learning
    • Case study 1: Adobe Presenter
    • Case study 2: Webcast
    • Case study 3: Articulate
  • 4. A Brief Introduction
    • Who am I?
    • What is my Instructional Design experience?
      • Instructor Led
      • Webcasts
      • eLearning
    • What is my industry experience?
      • Accounting / Financial Services
      • Telecommunications / Wireless Provider
      • Restaurant Industry
      • Banking
    • What eLearning technology have I used?
      • Captivate
      • Articulate Suite
      • Lectora
      • Adobe Presenter
      • Raptivity
  • 5. Adult Learning Theory ftp://ftp-fc.sc.egov.usda.gov/NEDC/isd/ adult _ learning _ theory Adapted from: Knowles, M. (1996). Adult Learning. In Robert L. Craig (Ed.), The ASTD Training and Development Handbook (pp. 253-264). NY: McGraw-Hill. Activities should be based around real work experiences. Present training with as many options for learning as possible. Design activities that reflect the actual work learners perform. Don’t do an information dump. Focus activities on “doing” something with the information rather than simply “knowing” it. Activities should demonstrate to the learner where he or she would benefit in their jobs.
  • 6. Scenario Based Learning
    • Clients are requesting scenarios in their training.
    • Traditional scenario based learning…
      • Uses real life situations to teach the subject.
        • Using real life scenarios heightens the relevance of the e-learning course because the focus is more on application than plain theory.
      • Presents the learner with real life situations.
        • The learner is then prompted to respond to the situation. Learning takes place through the feedback the learner receives based on their choices throughout the scenario.
      • Creates highly engaging and interactive courses.
        • The learner becomes an active participant in the learning process .
  • 7. Traditional Scenario Based eLearning Approximately 120 ID design and development hours per hour of eLearning.
  • 8. Design Challenges with Scenario Based Learning
    • Designing and developing within constraints:
    • LMS doesn’t allow for branching
    • Low end eLearning platform – platform itself can’t branch
    • Not enough time for scenario based design and development
    • Lack of SME involvement
    • Any others that you have been faced with?
  • 9. So What Can We Do?
    • Do the best we can to incorporate “real world” scenarios into the learning.
    • Can anyone give an example of how they done this?
  • 10. Case Study 1: Adobe Presenter
    • The client was a wireless company.
    • They were rolling out an industry changing program that included rewards.
    • My deliverable was a 60 minute eLearning course that introduced the Rewards program.
      • The client wanted the course to...
        • Teach concepts.
        • Provide brand messaging.
        • Excite their associates.
  • 11. Case Study 1: Adobe Presenter, continued
    • Positives:
    • Ample time for design and development.
    • Great SME involvement.
    • Great buy-in from the business.
    • Option of using Captivate within the Adobe Presenter wrapper
    • Constraints:
    • LMS didn’t allow for branching.
    • Client could not support audio.
    • eLearning platform (Adobe Presenter) did not allow for increased levels of interactivity.
  • 12. Case Study 1: Adobe Presenter My Design (Very High Level)
    • Introduce the Rewards program with a marketing spin.
    • Provide 2 robust “real world” scenarios where an associate discusses the Rewards program with a potential customer.
    • Debrief the scenario with what the associate did well.
    • Ask knowledge check questions to check the understanding of the content presented in the scenario.
  • 13. Placeholder for Work Sample
  • 14. What About a Webcast?
    • Can you think of ways to incorporate scenario based learning into a webcast?
  • 15. Case Study 2: Webcast
    • The client was a financial services firm.
    • My deliverable was a 60 minute Risk Management webcast.
      • The client wanted the course to...
        • Teach concepts.
        • Be more exciting and relevant than typical risk management training.
  • 16. Case Study 2: Webcast, continued
    • Positives:
    • Ample time for design and development.
    • Good SME involvement.
    • Good buy-in from the business.
    • SME’s were willing to present live.
    • Collaborated with a great manager.
    • Constraints:
    • Webcast platform did not allow for whiteboard.
      • Text chat was limited.
  • 17. Case Study 2: Webcast Our Design (Very High Level)
    • Introduce our main character, Barbara.
    • Demonstrate Barbara’s journey through risk management.
    • Ask knowledge check questions where the learner is prompted to respond to the scenario.
    • Provide the “teach piece” as a debrief.
      • “ What did Barbara do wrong?”
  • 18. Placeholder for Work Sample
  • 19. Case Study 3: Articulate or Lectora
    • The client was a banking institution.
    • My deliverable was a 90 minute Advice and Planning eLearning course.
      • The client wanted the course to...
        • Introduce the Advice and Planning Model.
        • Describe how Financial Planning fit into the Advice and Planning Model.
        • Provide audience specific scenarios to bring the content to life.
  • 20. Case Study 3: Articulate or Lectora, continued
    • Positives:
    • Some existing content.
      • A previous version of the course existed, but it needed to be completely reworked.
    • Very knowledgeable SME’s who had great examples.
    • Constraints:
    • Limited phone time with SME’s.
      • Only a total of 4 one hour calls.
    • Limited overall SME availability to answer emails.
    • Limited design and development time.
      • Only 80 total hours.
  • 21. Case Study 2: Articulate or Lectora (Very High Level)
    • Introduce the Advice and Planning Model.
    • Provide mini-examples of what each step in the model may look and sound like.
    • Discuss Financial Planning.
    • Provide 3 audience specific scenarios that show the Advice and Planning Model “in action”.
  • 22. Placeholder for Work Sample
  • 23. What do you think?
    • What do you think worked well?
    • Do you see anything that I could have done better?
    • Do you have any questions that I can answer?
  • 24. What are Your Success Stories?
    • Who wants to share how they’ve designed or developed scenario based learning using rapid eLearning tools?
  • 25. Creating Scenario-Based Learning Using Rapid eLearning Tools Chicago eLearning & Technology Showcase August 16, 2011