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A journey into Upper-Paleolithic Art

A journey into Upper-Paleolithic Art

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When, where, and how did they do it? When, where, and how did they do it? Presentation Transcript

  • Reconstruct The cave of Lascaux: Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A Web Quest for 12 th Grade Art Concepts Designed by Traci Anna Wilson [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page
  • Introduction Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] During the Upper-Paleolithic, the earliest art was created coinciding with the appearance of culture. Paleolithic means old stone age, and “Upper” generally refers to the time period in Europe. It broadly dates between 40,000 and 10,000 years ago, before agriculture was invented. It wasn’t until the Neanderthals became extinct approximately 36,000 b.p. that visual systems emerged. Creative achievements throughout this time period fall into two broad categories: Parietal art, and Mobiliary art . Parietal art refers to paintings and engravings found on cave walls and ceilings. It is believed that these caves were not for inhabitants, but a place to facilitate ceremonial practices. Mobiliary art refers to sculptural objects found buried in habitation sites. The earliest unequivocal evidence of human beings having the capacity to interpret and give meaning to our surroundings are found in caves in western Europe, primarily in France and Spain. From these paintings, we see mastery of the environment and development of intellectual accomplishments. Lascaux, France has a series of caves that are some of the most impressive and well-known art created by Paleolithic humans. The cave of Lascaux (La grotte de Lascaux), discovered in 1940 , has over 1500 figures that date back 17,000 years! Among these pictures, there is only one picture of a human. It is rare to see humans depicted in cave paintings. Over 900 can be identified as animals that can be found in the surrounding landscape: horses, bison, mammoths , ibex , aurochs , deer, lions, bears, and wolves. The species of animals depicted were both animals that would have been eaten and animals that would have been predators. Geometric figures can also be found. There are six areas in the Cave of Lascaux all of which have particular themes. These sites are: Great Hall of Bulls , Lateral Passage , Shaft of the Dead Man , Painted Gallery , Chamber of Engravings , and Chamber of Felines . Since the discovery of the cave, it has suffered deterioration due to the high volume of human traffic. Controversy surrounds the cave with issues in regards to keeping it open to the public. This issue affects many people including art historians, anthropologists, scientists, travelers, and the French economy. What happens if it closes down? What happens if it stays open? Should we allow future generations to have an opportunity to experience it? Should it be closed to preserve one of the most valuable art galleries in human history? There are many sites on the web that people can go to explore this cave virtually, but if it is to be closed for good, how will generations to come know what it is like to experience the cave authentically? If it does close for good, the only solution is try and recreate parts of the cave as closely as possible to show in museums. If you strongly feel that it should stay open, you need to convince the curator to keep it open to the public. If you agree that it should be closed and you feel that you should be hired to recreate it, you need to convince the Curator you have the ability to do so. We need a writer, an artist, and a geologist to work together and figure this out. You are the perfect candidates! You may want to read the introduction, task, and process before you click on your links and begin your research
  • The Task Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
      • Research Upper-Paleolithic technology, art, and culture
      • Write a letter to the Curator of the Cave of Lascaux convincing her that this is the best solution. You have to prove your knowledge of the subject (including the pros and cons of this solution), so you must include evidence of the research you do, and site your references. This letter is to be written in Microsoft Word, and contain no spelling or grammatical errors.
      • A sketchbook of cave paintings will be included in the project. The sketchbook must include chapters representing each site in the cave. Each chapter must have a variety of paintings (Corridors that have more paintings on the walls should have more paintings in the chapters representing those corridors). This sketchbook is to practice drawing the pictures and take small notes of what materials were used to create these paintings, the method in which they were gathered, and the process it took to make tools from this time period etc.. Remember that tool innovation was (and still is today) a large part of social and culture progress. There will be one sketch book per person. Every sketchbook will be referred to when making the finished product. You may use any materials (color pencils, paint, etc.) to most accurately represent the paintings.
      • If you think the cave of Lascaux should be closed to the public but you can re-create it, you need:
      • Ceramic slabs of examples of the cave paintings to prove to the Curator that you are able to duplicate the paintings accurately.
      • The team who chooses to recreate the cave will collaborate as a whole and use the slabs to recreate The Cave of Lascaux.
      • If you think it should stay open you need:
      • A Power Point Presentation using the sketchbook drawings, inferences from the letter, and a convincing stance with support from your research.
      • The team who chooses to keep the cave open will have to present their Power Point in class and scripted as if you were giving it to the Curator.
      • It is important to learn how to skim through sites to find the information you need. When you do research, you do not read EVERYTHING. You find the specific information you are looking for and then you read thoroughly. Every link has important information you can use, you just might have to look for it.
    Title
  • The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • Both teams will Start the process by:
    • First you need to determine what stance you want to take
    • Teams of three will be assigned after your stance has been decided
    • Once your groups have been assigned, you need to figure out who is going to research what. Make sure you explore all of the hyperlinks because there is valuable information for each subject imbedded throughout all of them.
        • Team member 1 (the artist) will research the pre-historical aspects and who created the paintings. Find out about their culture practices, how they lived, social structure etc. You will also need to know how they applied the pigment. How is this art? What do artist say about it? What are some theories about art during the Paleolithic?
        • Team member 2 (the geologist) will research materials. You will need to find out what kinds of minerals were used to create the paint and the tools and processes people went through to make their paint.
        • Team member 3 (the archeaologist) will research the archaeological aspects. Who discovered it and who followed up on the discovery? How have scientists and archaeologists determined how old the site is and what it means? What artifacts are found ? What kind of discoveries have been made through their research?
    • After you have gathered all of your research, all group members must collaborate the information and create an outline to write your letter. Using a form of brainstorming technique may be helpful.
    • Once you have determined how you letter is going to go, each student will write about their researched topic.
    • Together, everyone will combine what they wrote and create the letter.
    • Next you will:
    • Explore the Cave of Lascaux’s official site and take the virtual tour of the cave. Here is where you can find many examples to use for your sketch book.
    • Collaborate your information while working in your sketchbooks and take notes.
    • “ Close it” Team Final Task
    • Each team member is to make ten clay slabs with texture representing a rock wall. Each corridor will be represented. As a team, decide which member is going to which painting. Keep in mind that one of the corridors is full of engravings. Who is going to do what? The Shaft of the Dead Man can be a collaboration. After the slabs have been bisque fired, treat the surface to give it a rock wall effect. Shoe polish works well. You are to recreate these cave paintings from your sketches using the actual materials that were used in the Cave of Lascaux (i.e. yellow ocher, magnesium etc., and tools used). These materials will be provided.
    • When the slabs are finished, everyone in the “close it” team will collaborate and recreate the cave of Lascaux. There will be a designated area where this to be accomplished. Explore possible materials to create the cave (paper bags, Styrofoam…) The cave must have plaques describing the works of art. Be creative!
    • Keep it Open” Team’s Final Task:
    • All groups collaborate all of your information and sketches and create a Power Point Presentation. Use the information you used in your letters to draw inferences. The “archaeologist,” “geologist,” and “artist” must be represented. You can get creative with your presentation by making a dramatization (i.e. mock trial). Everyone has to have a role to play during the presentation. This Power Point presentation will displayed along with recreated cave, so make sure your Power Point is concise, and clear enough for anyone to understand. Include resources!!
    • Remember that this is your time to “surf the web” so take advantage of exploring the websites imbedded throughout this WebQuest and explore other links in other Web Sites. Many of the links you will use for you research are found in the introduction.
  • Evaluation for Both Teams Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation for Both Teams Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Score Spelling, Grammar, and Length of Essay The letter is very short and full of spelling and grammatical errors The letter is less than five pages and has some spelling and grammatical errors. The letter is between five and eight pages long. There are no spelling or grammatical errors. The letter is between five and eight pages long. It is concise, informative, and professional. There are no spelling or grammatical errors. Research and references Every hyperlink was not sited and the bibliography is incorrect or does not existent. Information from every hyperlink is included throughout the whole project. Links are not sited appropriately in the bibliography. Information from every hyperlink is included throughout the whole project. Every link is sited appropriately in a bibliography. Information from every hyperlink is included throughout the whole project including outside sources. Every source and link is sited appropriately in a bibliography. sketchbook There is hardly any variety in drawings, chapters are missing, and the pictures do not accurately represent the paintings. The variety of pictures are limited. There are six chapters representing each corridor. The pictures somewhat represent the cave paintings. The sketchbook has a variety of drawings representing the cave paintings. There are six chapters representing each corridor. The pictures represent the paintings well. The sketchbook has a variety of drawings representing the cave paintings. There are six chapters representing each corridor. Every picture is identical to the cave paintings. Outline An outline was not created prior to the letter A somewhat thorough outline is created prior to the letter. A thorough outline is created prior to the letter. A thorough outline is created in co-ordinance with a concept map or form of brainstorming tool prior to the letter. Teamwork and participation Did not get along with group members and did not do the research that was expected Got along with group members for the most part and did most of the work that was expected. Worked well with the other members in the group. Did the work that was expected and was knowledgeable about the subject after doing the research. Worked well with the other members in the group. Did more the work that was expected by furthering research and was knowledgeable about the subject after doing the research.
  • Evaluation for “Close it “Team Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Pro-Team Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Score Clay Slabs Less than ten clay slabs with texture representing a rock wall. Each looks close to real cave art. Every corridor was represented. Less than ten clay slabs with texture representing a rock wall. Each looks close to real cave art. Every corridor was represented. Ten clay slabs with texture representing a rock wall. Each looks authentic and like real cave art. Every corridor was represented. More than ten clay slabs with texture representing a rock wall. Each looks authentic and like real cave art. Every corridor was represented Safety Did not follow safety precautions and created an unsafe environment. Followed safety precautions for the most part. Followed safety precautions and led by example. Checking more than once for a safe environment. Followed safety precautions and led by example. Went above and beyond by checking more than twice for a safe environment. Cave Didn’t work on the cave during most of its construction from beginning and end, and did not have any good material ideas. Didn’t collaborate well with group members. Didn’t work on the cave during as much of other group members during its construction from beginning and end, and did not have a lot of good material ideas. Could have collaborated better with group members. Worked on the cave during much of its construction from beginning and end, had good material ideas, and worked well collaborating with others as it was being built. Went over and beyond with creating the cave. Worked on the cave from beginning and end, had good material ideas, and worked well collaborating with others as it was being built. Attitude Bad attitude and did not do well working with others Attitude could have been more positive. Did not lead well Had a pretty attitude throughout the whole project and was a positive leader to group leaders Had a great attitude throughout the whole project and was a positive leader to group leaders Educated opinion Opinion was not clearly stated. Opinions made were not based on research. Opinions stated had little backing from research. Opinion is clearly stated and backed up with the research that has been done. Opinion is clearly stated and backed up with the research that has been done. Student was very persuasive and convincing.
  • Evaluation for “Keep it Open” Team Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Con-Team Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Score Safety Did not follow safety precautions and created an unsafe environment. Followed safety precautions for the most part. Followed safety precautions and led by example. Checking more than once for a safe environment. Followed safety precautions and led by example. Went above and beyond by checking more than twice for a safe environment. Attitude Bad attitude and did not do well working with others Attitude could have been more positive. Did not lead well Had a pretty attitude throughout the whole project and was a positive leader to group leaders Had a great attitude throughout the whole project and was a positive leader to group leaders Keep it Open Team Power Point Did not contribute to the Power Point using personal materials. There were no opinions made based on research Contributed to the Power Point using sketches or references. There was no opinion formulated based on research. Contributed to the Power Point using sketches or references. Personal opinion is based on research. Contributed to the Power Point using both sketches, references and personal opinion based is on research. Educated opinion Opinion was not clearly stated. Opinions made were not based on research. Opinions stated had little backing from research. Opinion is clearly stated and backed up with the research that has been done. Opinion is clearly stated and backed up with the research that has been done. Student was very persuasive and convincing.
  • Conclusion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • Regardless to which side you choose to take, you should have a better understanding of prehistoric art, and the many issues that come up revolving around rock art. Using the links provided, you should have had the opportunity to explore other caves and different types of art according to culture and location. Remember that although you are emulating art, you still have to go through a creative process and problem solve coming up with ways you are able to make this work. Both teams are expected to have a creative finished product. There are little rules! You want to come up with a product that can teach others about what you learned through this Web Quest. Don’t forget to use links embedded in the Websites.
    • How does your new knowledge change your perspective about art and what it means? Did your perspective change?
    • Did you try and imagine what it was like to live in the Paleolithic era?
    • How do you think being an artist 17,000 years ago differs from being an artist today? How is it the same?
      • Tools
      • Environment
      • Purpose /content
    • What did you like about this assignment? What did you not like about this assignment?
  • Credits & References Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] The WebQuest Page The WebQuest Slideshare Group http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upper_Paleolithic Earliest Art: http://www.jqjacobs.net/rock_art/dawn.html Parietal art, and Mobiliary: http://www.wynja.com/arch/entdiag.html Lascaux, France: http://www.mazzaroth.com/ChapterOne/LascauxCave.htm Discovered in 1940: http://www.eduplace.com/kids/socsci/ca/books/bkf3/writing/01_lascaux.pdf Mammoths: http://www.museum.state.il.us/exhibits/larson/mammuthus.html Ibex: http://www.americazoo.com/goto/index/mammals/421.htm Aurochs: http://users.aristotle.net/~swarmack/aurochs.html Six sites: http://www.frenchfriends.info/gallery/Aquitaine/Lascaux_Cave/lascaux_map.gif.html Great Hall of Bulls: http://www.culture.gouv.fr/culture/arcnat/lascaux/en/f-st.htm Lateral Passage: http://web.culture.fr/culture/arcnat/lascaux/en/ps.htm Shaft of the Dead Man: http://www.culture.gouv.fr/culture/arcnat/lascaux/en/pt.htm Painted Gallery: http://www.culture.gouv.fr/culture/arcnat/lascaux/en/f-da.htm Chamber of Engravings: http://www.culture.gouv.fr/culture/arcnat/lascaux/en/ab.htm Chamber of Felines: http://www.culture.gouv.fr/culture/arcnat/lascaux/en/f-df.htm Deterioration: http://www.savelascaux.org/TIMEMagazine.pdf Controversy: http://www.savelascaux.org/crisis_CoverUp.php Upper-Paleolithic technology, culture and art: http://bruceowen.com/worldprehist/3250s06.htm Curator: http://www.archeociel.com/Accueil_eng.htm Tools: http://www.handprint.com/LS/ANC/stones.html Culture: http://hoopermuseum.earthsci.carleton.ca/emily/thirteen.html Artist: http://www.columbia.edu/itc/anthropology/v1007/2002projects/artcreation_files/default.htm Theories: http://www.antiquityofman.com/Trance_Lewis-Williams.html Art during: http://www.erowid.org/library/review/review.php?p=220 Minerals: http://gwydir.demon.co.uk/jo/minerals/pigments.htm Processes: http://webexhibits.org/pigments/intro/early.html How old: http://radiocarbon.library.arizona.edu/radiocarbon/GetFileServlet?file=file:///data1/pdf/Radiocarbon/Volume43/Number2B/azu_radiocarbon_v43_n2B_977_986_v.pdf&type=application/pdf Artifacts: http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Acropolis/5645/upperpaleolithic.html Discoveries: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid/vol11no07/about_cover.htm The Cave of Lascaux official site: http://www.culture.gouv.fr/culture/arcnat/lascaux/en/ Website to hyperlinks are listed in order by link For additional information about WebQuest and Slideshare click the following links
  • Reconstruct The cave of Lascaux: For the teacher [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A Web Quest for 12 th Grade Designed by Traci Anna Wilson [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • Introduction [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • This lesson was developed for students to think about a problem that is occurring at one of the oldest and most famous art/archaeology sites in history. The cave has more than 1500 pictures of animals, all of which are 17,000 years old! The cave of Lascaux in France is deteriorating due to human traffic transporting bacteria since it was discovered in 1940 from four teenaged boys. The battle to keep it open to human traffic remains to be a global controversy effecting art historians, anthropologists, scientists, travelers, and the French economy.
    • The main objectives for this lesson are:
    • For students to learn about the cave of Lascaux:
        • The location and antiquity
        • The history of its discovery
        • Identify the paintings
        • Legal issues and controversies that envelop it
    • For students to see that art is one of the oldest forms of non-verbal communication
    • To understand the process Paleolithic humans went through to create the cave paintings and the materials used
    • For students to think about the concept of art and the role it has played throughout culture history
    • For students to realize how long people have been painting
    • To develop insightful and personal opinions about issues that involve art and the history, preservation, rights, legal issues, and community that surrounds it
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • Learners [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is anchored in a 12 th grade art concepts and history class. It involves geography, geology, art history, painting and drawing, and social sciences. This lesson is designed for students to integrate other schools of thought when dealing with issues that surround art. When students reach upper division high school art classes, they most likely would like to continue with art and/or art history after high school. Based on this assumption students need to explore the conceptual and historical aspects of art to know how to develop their own meaning and purpose of art. Previous to this lesson, students should have taken visual art classes and Art History 1 to have some understanding of cave art and the historical process the world of art and culture has taken. Because some of this lesson deals with legal and social issues, it is important that they have a background in World History and Social Studies. There are still many valuable things that students can learn without a background in any of these things, but because of the critical conceptual thinking, 12 th grade would be the most age appropriate population. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • Curriculum Standards [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • The students will gain a better understanding of the historical and cultural value of art. They will learn how Paleolithic humans created their cave paintings by exploring the material s they used to create a medium, how they manipulated and worked with nature to create their art, and the conceptual and communication value that cave art has. Students will draw inferences from other course work to draw conclusions about their personal opinions on global and historical issues. This lesson encourages:
        • Critical thinking and problem-solving
        • Creative production
        • Observation
        • Comparison
        • Teamwork
        • Compromise
    • This lesson follows all five of the Colorado Visual Art Content Standards and the following Benchmarks for 12 th grade:
    • 1. Communication -- Students recognize and use the visual arts as a means of communication.
        • Distinguish among visual images, themes and ideas in works of art that express meaning.
        • Use visual images and ideas to communicate intended meaning in works of art.
        • Evaluate the use of visual images, themes and ideas to communicate intended meaning.
    • 2. Perception -- Students know, understand and apply elements of visual arts and principles of design.
        • Compare and contrast design elements, organizational principles, expressive features and functions of art.
        • Evaluate the use of basic components in developing and solving visual arts problems.
    • 3. Application/Creation -- Students know and apply visual arts materials, techniques, and processes.
        • Demonstrate an understanding of the use of materials, techniques and processes.
        • Evaluate the relationship between ideas and materials, techniques and processes used.
    • 4. Heritage -- Students relate the visual arts to history and culture.
        • Describe the functions, meanings, and significance of works of art within various cultures.
        • Create works of art influenced by various cultures and historical periods.
        • Evaluate, analyze, and interpret works of art as related to history and culture.
    • 5. Aesthetics/Art Criticism -- Students describe, analyze, interpret and evaluate works of art.
        • Interpret meaning in works of art.
        • Analyze works of art through critical and aesthetic inquiry.
        • Demonstrate the ability to form and defend appropriate judgments.
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • The Process [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Please see the “student” process slide . There are three phases to this project. Students will have the opportunity choose the direction their finished product will take. This will be in step three depending on if they feel that the cave should stay open or if it should stay closed. There are pros and cons for both. The “close it” team is for those who think it should be closed and the “keep it open” team is for those who think it should stay open. They will all research the same material and establish their own educated opinion based on the information they research. This project is set up as a whole unit. It should take about one month to complete. It meets all of the state content standards. This is an interdisciplinary lesson, drawing inferences from several curriculum based classes. The idea is have students think beyond the actual art process and consider how conclusions have been made based on discoveries. As this lesson is based on an era that the first art was created, it has taken many practices beyond the field of art to develop an understanding of where it all began. Phase one and phase two will eventually intertwine, but it is important that students begin their research and find what they are looking for before they take too many notes and drawings. Each student needs to identify their role and gather the appropriate information before really “dig in” to their research. Before the Web Quest is introduced, give an overview (with very little detail), of this issue at hand-should it remain open or should it be closed? Have students decide which stance they want to take based on little information. At the end of the Unit, students should understand the value of knowing all of the information before establishing a solid opinion. Split the class into two according to what stance they want to take. Split the students from each side into groups of three according on what role each student wants to play. If the outcome is uneven, have each group of three draw out of a bucket a role that they will be assigned. It does not matter if the weight of each team is uneven, If there are only tree students who feel it should remain open, they can still do the Power Point and vise versa. If there are less than three students in either team, they have the option to take the other stance and join the class for the final project. If they choose to do the project alone they may. You will have to make small alterations for the evaluation. When everyone is in their assigned groups, have each group come up with a “group constitution” to follow throughout this unit. Everyone will be held accountable to teach each other. Students should figure out how they are going to go through the process, when they are going to meet, and how Phase three will be executed. Students will sign their constitution and will be out for everyone to see when working on it in class. The teacher may have to research this subject before the unit is introduced. Pre-historic art was introduced through art history classes in college, but a lot of the information is more detailed than given in typical art history classes. Although this unit ultimately requires expression of opinion based on research, the teacher does not need to have experience with debate or role playing. The important thing for students is to own their opinions and know where they come from. Students will have to use the library computers when this unit begins. If the library does not have enough computers for all of the groups, split computer use time accordingly so everyone has an opportunity to use a computer during class. Hold class discussions for those who are not on the computer. This time can be to answer any questions, discuss issues revolving any part of the content being studied, and time for groups to brainstorm about their project. Students will also have the option to research using books from the library. Student s will be expected to work on this project outside of class. Help students figure out how to do this. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • Resources [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
    • The lesson makes extensive use of specific websites, click on credits from the student page to see a list of them.
    • Have available
      • It might be good to talk to the science teacher to see if he/she has examples of rocks and minerals that were used to extract pigment.
      • Make sure to have the pigments available in the classroom. All of them are used to create glazes, so you can generally find them through your glaze supply company. If there are some pigments that are hard to find, use a comparable mineral.
      • Figure out how many computers are available. Organize how the lesson will go according to computer access. Do you have to make a schedule? Are you available outside of class for assistance?
      • Make sure that the school computers have PowerPoint.
      • Every student has a sketchbook.
    • Make a list of student e-mail addresses
    • This project may interfere with some students’ belief systems. Make sure to inform parents of this project before you start. Make sure to stress that this project revolves around an existing issue.
    • See if any local museums have exhibits on cave art. If so, incorporate a field trip for students to take after the project is over.
  • Evaluation [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • The evaluation has three pages to it. You will have to scroll
    • down to get each evaluation page.
    • Students will be held accountable for the research they do according to what role they want to play.
    • Each student will be graded separately on their sketchbooks and how thoroughly they do their research.
    • Students Will be Able To:
    • Write in essay form about the culture, lifestyle, and artistic meaning of Upper-Paleolithic human beings (Standards 1, and 4).
    • Support their opinion in essay form how cave art is considered to be works of art and why it should be preserved (Standards 4, and 5).
    • Keep a sketchbook of interpretive drawings of cave art and note how UP humans would have done it, i.e. tools, process, materials etc (Standards 3).
    • Demonstrate safe and appropriateness throughout the process of this project (Standard 3).
    • Combine information that is gathered in groups (Standard 1).
    • Close it Team:
    • Make eleven clay slabs with cave art pictures on them. Each corridor will be represented (Standards 2, and 3)
    • Describe in writing on plaques what the paintings and corridors mean.
    • Keep it Open Team:
    • Scan pictures from sketchbook and make them presentable, and easy to depict (Standards 2, and 3).
    • Describe in a presentation how cave paintings and engravings are considered to be works of art (Standard s 4, and 5).
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • Teacher Script (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • The Web Quest model is best suited for learners who can navigate the Web on their own and can read the kinds of material commonly found on the Web. We can stretch the format to reach primary-aged learners, developmental English Language Learners and special populations by creating a facilitated Web Quest, one that requires an adult or older peer to drive things.
    • Use this page to create a script for that facilitator. The facilitator would print this page out and use it to guide their progress through the Web Quest.
    • This page will include step by step directions to the facilitator, including:
      • Explain to the class the project as a whole. Give them the big picture and how long it will take and the processes they will have to take.
      • Explain how important it is for everyone to click on all of the links to find what they are looking for.
      • There will be a lot to read. Encourage them to take advantage of skimming. This is great research practice.
      • This project may need to adjust and change according to class dynamic. Allow room for modifications. This is supposed to be fu. If something does not work, take it out.
      • Each step should take as long as a week. Some points may take longer. If it is going to take longer than a month, allow room in your curriculum to let that happen.
      • The computer is for information. Students are encouraged to be creative. Have students get the majority of their research materials gathered toward the beginning of the assignment, then have them work with each other and using their creativity.
    • This page is linked to the Process segment off of the Teacher Page
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • Conclusion [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • This lesson is great for an AP art class for so many reasons.
    • It requires critical thinking skills and draw inferences from many other schools of thought.
    • It will teach students to make educated opinions based on research.
    • It is important for Students who are interested in the art world to know where art as a concept in the individual and in different cultures through time and space.
    • Art has played an important role in the development of culture, innovation, and record keeping. Students will gain a better understanding of the time line of this development.
    • This is great for students to learn how to work with peers and colleagues from different areas of study. Artists and art historians often weave in and out of other areas of study. It is important to know other roles are important.
    • There is some ambiguity left in the process of this lesson. This will allow the students to be more creative and use their problem solving skills. The people who created cave art had to use what they had available. Students will be encouraged to be creative with the resources they have available.
    • The intention of this lesson is to have fun and explore the unknown. The only thing we know about cave art is that it exists, and through radiocarbon dating and other dating techniques it has been around for over 17,000 years! Anything else we know about it is based on theories people have developed through extensive research and collaboration with people through time, space and practice. This lesson will give students the opportunity to draw their own microcosmic conclusions.
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Website to hyperlinks are listed in order by link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upper_Paleolithic Earliest Art: http://www.jqjacobs.net/rock_art/dawn.html Parietal art, and Mobiliary: http://www.wynja.com/arch/entdiag.html Lascaux, France: http://www.mazzaroth.com/ChapterOne/LascauxCave.htm Discovered in 1940: http://www.eduplace.com/kids/socsci/ca/books/bkf3/writing/01_lascaux.pdf Mammoths: http://www.museum.state.il.us/exhibits/larson/mammuthus.html Ibex: http://www.americazoo.com/goto/index/mammals/421.htm Aurochs: http://users.aristotle.net/~swarmack/aurochs.html Six sites: http://www.frenchfriends.info/gallery/Aquitaine/Lascaux_Cave/lascaux_map.gif.html Great Hall of Bulls: http://www.culture.gouv.fr/culture/arcnat/lascaux/en/f-st.htm Lateral Passage: http://web.culture.fr/culture/arcnat/lascaux/en/ps.htm Shaft of the Dead Man: http://www.culture.gouv.fr/culture/arcnat/lascaux/en/pt.htm Painted Gallery: http://www.culture.gouv.fr/culture/arcnat/lascaux/en/f-da.htm Chamber of Engravings: http://www.culture.gouv.fr/culture/arcnat/lascaux/en/ab.htm Chamber of Felines: http://www.culture.gouv.fr/culture/arcnat/lascaux/en/f-df.htm Deterioration: http://www.savelascaux.org/TIMEMagazine.pdf Controversy: http://www.savelascaux.org/crisis_CoverUp.php Upper-Paleolithic technology, culture and art: http://bruceowen.com/worldprehist/3250s06.htm Curator: http://www.archeociel.com/Accueil_eng.htm Tools: http://www.handprint.com/LS/ANC/stones.html Culture: http://hoopermuseum.earthsci.carleton.ca/emily/thirteen.html Artist: http://www.columbia.edu/itc/anthropology/v1007/2002projects/artcreation_files/default.htm Theories: http://www.antiquityofman.com/Trance_Lewis-Williams.html Art during: http://www.erowid.org/library/review/review.php?p=220 Minerals: http://gwydir.demon.co.uk/jo/minerals/pigments.htm Processes: http://webexhibits.org/pigments/intro/early.html How old: http://radiocarbon.library.arizona.edu/radiocarbon/GetFileServlet?file=file:///data1/pdf/Radiocarbon/Volume43/Number2B/azu_radiocarbon_v43_n2B_977_986_v.pdf&type=application/pdf Artifacts: http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Acropolis/5645/upperpaleolithic.html Discoveries: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid/vol11no07/about_cover.htm The Cave of Lascaux official site: http://www.culture.gouv.fr/culture/arcnat/lascaux/en/ Additional information about Web Quest and Slide Share can be found at the following links: The WebQuest Page The WebQuest Slideshare Group