American Transcendentalism<br />“ It was a high counsel that I once heard given to a young person, always do what you are ...
Transcendentalism<br /><ul><li>A literary movement in the 1830’s that established a clear “American voice”.
Emerson first expressed his philosophy in his essay “Nature”.
A belief in a higher reality than that achieved by human reasoning.
Suggests that every individual is capable of discovering this higher truth through intuition.</li></li></ul><li>
<ul><li>Unlike Puritans, they saw humans and nature as possessing an innate goodness.</li></ul>“In the faces of men and wo...
Transcendentalism: The tenets:<br /><ul><li>Believed in living close to nature/importance of nature. Everything in nature ...
Believed in social reform and peace—a perfect Utopia.
Advocated self-trust/ confidence
Valued individuality/non-conformity/free thought/intuition (over science and laws)
Advocated self-reliance/ simplicity</li></li></ul><li>
The first transcendentalists<br /><ul><li>Ralph Waldo Emerson
Henry David Thoreau</li></li></ul><li>
“Nature”<br /><ul><li>Thoreau began “essential” living
Built a cabin on land owned to Emerson in Concord, Mass. near Walden Pond
Lived alone there</li></ul>   for two years studying <br />    nature and seeking <br />    truth within himself<br />
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American Transcendentalism Good Copy[1]

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American Transcendentalism Good Copy[1]

  1. 1. American Transcendentalism<br />“ It was a high counsel that I once heard given to a young person, always do what you are afraid to do.”<br /> - Ralph Waldo Emerson<br />
  2. 2. Transcendentalism<br /><ul><li>A literary movement in the 1830’s that established a clear “American voice”.
  3. 3. Emerson first expressed his philosophy in his essay “Nature”.
  4. 4. A belief in a higher reality than that achieved by human reasoning.
  5. 5. Suggests that every individual is capable of discovering this higher truth through intuition.</li></li></ul><li>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Unlike Puritans, they saw humans and nature as possessing an innate goodness.</li></ul>“In the faces of men and women, I see God”<br /> -Walt Whitman<br /><ul><li>Opposed strict ritualism and </li></ul>dogma of established religion. <br />
  7. 7.
  8. 8. Transcendentalism: The tenets:<br /><ul><li>Believed in living close to nature/importance of nature. Everything in nature is a reflection of the Divine Soul--the source of truth and inspiration. (Helped people transcend to higher spiritual levels).
  9. 9. Believed in social reform and peace—a perfect Utopia.
  10. 10. Advocated self-trust/ confidence
  11. 11. Valued individuality/non-conformity/free thought/intuition (over science and laws)
  12. 12. Advocated self-reliance/ simplicity</li></li></ul><li>
  13. 13. The first transcendentalists<br /><ul><li>Ralph Waldo Emerson
  14. 14. Henry David Thoreau</li></li></ul><li>
  15. 15. “Nature”<br /><ul><li>Thoreau began “essential” living
  16. 16. Built a cabin on land owned to Emerson in Concord, Mass. near Walden Pond
  17. 17. Lived alone there</li></ul> for two years studying <br /> nature and seeking <br /> truth within himself<br />
  18. 18.
  19. 19.
  20. 20. “Still we live meanly like ants.”“Our life is frittered away by detail.”“Why should we live with such hurry and waste of life?”“Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity. I say, let your affairs be as two or three and not a hundred or a thousand.”<br />
  21. 21.
  22. 22. Individuality<br />“How deep the ruts of tradition and conformity.”<br />
  23. 23.
  24. 24. “If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music he hears, however measured or far away.”<br />
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