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TPP Not for Profit
CV Workshop
About TPP
• 16+ years experience with large variety of
charities
• All of our consultants are sector specialists
• Large n...
Why spend time
on your CV?
• Need to sell your skills and experience – make
you look your best
• Employers get hundreds of...
What goes on a CV?
• Contact details
• Personal statement (optional)
• Key skills (optional)
• Employment history
• Educat...
Contact Details
• Full name
• Address (home)
• Telephone number (home and mobile)
• Email address (personal but profession...
Personal Statement
• Tailor to each application
• Summary of your skills and experience
• Keep it short - couple of paragr...
Personal Statement
What is a key skill?
enthusiasm
communication
Raiser’s Edge
teamwork
budget management
campaign management
managing agenci...
Key skills
• Pull out requirements from job description
• Give evidence to demonstrate each skill
Employment history
• Probably of most interest to employers
• Most recent first
• List duties and responsibilities
• Give ...
Education & Qualifications
• Most recent first
• Give full titles of course/qualification and dates
• State if incomplete ...
Additional Information
• Any other useful information, eg
– Languages
– IT skills or software used
– Hobbies and interests...
References
• Can write ‘references available on request’
• Will need at least two
• Choose recent but good referees
• Get ...
Presentation
• Clear, uncluttered and professional
• Formatting consistent throughout
• Avoid long paragraphs – use bullet...
Most Common Errors
• Mistakes in spelling and grammar
“I speak fluent English and Spinach”
• Long sentences and too much i...
Most Common Errors
• Over-formatting with images, fancy fonts etc
Cover Letters /
Supporting Statements
• What’s the difference?
• Similar content, but supporting statement should
be speci...
Cover Letters /
Supporting Statements
• Don’t repeat CV
• Must be tailored to each application
• Follow any guidelines giv...
Cover Letters /
Supporting Statements
• First and last lines must give a good impression
• Introduce yourself
• Talk about...
Getting the most
from your internship
• Do a good job! The more you give, the more you
get
• Ask for feedback
• Learn from...
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TPP Not for Profit Charity CV Workshop

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Information and tips for putting together a CV for a job in charity

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  • Do the best job you can, even if you are not getting paid. You’ll gain recognition and trust and may get more responsibility, as well as excellent references. Every so often, ask your boss how you’re doing. What could you do differently? What could you do better?     Ask co-workers to tell you about their job and what they do.    Find someone in the role you want to do and ask them how they got there Being able to demonstrate that you understand how different areas of nfp orgs work together is very valuable. Volunteer for tasks outside your immediate remit to build experience even more. A testimonial on an entry-level CV can be extremely powerful, esp from a reputable org like the UN.
  • Transcript of "TPP Not for Profit Charity CV Workshop"

    1. 1. TPP Not for Profit CV Workshop
    2. 2. About TPP • 16+ years experience with large variety of charities • All of our consultants are sector specialists • Large network of potential employers • Shared values with the third sector • Cover all types of charity role, all levels of staff, permanent, contract & temporary vacancies
    3. 3. Why spend time on your CV? • Need to sell your skills and experience – make you look your best • Employers get hundreds of applications (especially for entry-level roles) • Employers don’t have much time – be concise
    4. 4. What goes on a CV? • Contact details • Personal statement (optional) • Key skills (optional) • Employment history • Education and qualifications • Additional information • References
    5. 5. Contact Details • Full name • Address (home) • Telephone number (home and mobile) • Email address (personal but professional) “lazysod@hotmail.com” • Don’t give work contact details • Don’t include a photo
    6. 6. Personal Statement • Tailor to each application • Summary of your skills and experience • Keep it short - couple of paragraphs • Don’t repeat cover letter / supporting statement • Include three things: – Who you are – What you can contribute – Your career aim
    7. 7. Personal Statement
    8. 8. What is a key skill? enthusiasm communication Raiser’s Edge teamwork budget management campaign management managing agencies ambitious problem solving organisation work under pressure proactive honest principled fast learner
    9. 9. Key skills • Pull out requirements from job description • Give evidence to demonstrate each skill
    10. 10. Employment history • Probably of most interest to employers • Most recent first • List duties and responsibilities • Give measurable achievements where possible • Include voluntary experience • Do not lie or exaggerate – will be found out at interview
    11. 11. Education & Qualifications • Most recent first • Give full titles of course/qualification and dates • State if incomplete or ongoing • List anything relevant “World pie-eating champion 2010” • If overseas qualification, check UK equivalent
    12. 12. Additional Information • Any other useful information, eg – Languages – IT skills or software used – Hobbies and interests – Personal achievements – Voluntary/charity work • Include level of proficiency
    13. 13. References • Can write ‘references available on request’ • Will need at least two • Choose recent but good referees • Get permission before using their name
    14. 14. Presentation • Clear, uncluttered and professional • Formatting consistent throughout • Avoid long paragraphs – use bullets instead • Use headings, sub-headings and bold to make important info stand out • Don’t use unusual fonts or colours • Don’t use tables or tabs • Proofread! Don’t rely on auto spellcheck
    15. 15. Most Common Errors • Mistakes in spelling and grammar “I speak fluent English and Spinach” • Long sentences and too much irrelevant detail • Lack of specifics (roles, dates, achievements) • Incorrect contact info • Lack of tailoring to role (check CV filename) “GenericCV2013.doc”
    16. 16. Most Common Errors • Over-formatting with images, fancy fonts etc
    17. 17. Cover Letters / Supporting Statements • What’s the difference? • Similar content, but supporting statement should be specified and guided • Chance to demonstrate your personality and passion
    18. 18. Cover Letters / Supporting Statements • Don’t repeat CV • Must be tailored to each application • Follow any guidelines given! • Match each point of job description / person specification
    19. 19. Cover Letters / Supporting Statements • First and last lines must give a good impression • Introduce yourself • Talk about the organisation and their mission and how you can contribute • Provide evidence for your skills • Keep it short and break up copy
    20. 20. Getting the most from your internship • Do a good job! The more you give, the more you get • Ask for feedback • Learn from your co-workers • Ask for advice • Build your knowledge of different areas • Volunteer • Ask for a testimonial for your CV or LinkedIn
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