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WES Content Literacy Training August 2012

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  • Show motivational PowerPoint that illustrates what it is like to be a student.
  • Alabama’s Action Plan for Literacy – p. 13One Alabama school had as many as 88% of its graduates in remediation classes. This data illustrates the need for more rigorous literacy instruction through high school.
  • Have participants read the quote.Take a post-it and jot down one key point that stands out to you.Whip around.
  • Go over the outcome.Each part of our day today will follow this structure (Before, During and After). Some of our lessons will be designed for adults and we’ll have a lesson this afternoon designed for students. But in all lessons we will use a strategic lesson format which will help you identify and analyze the components of a strategic lesson. All of the strategies that we use could be applied to your content and they are listed on the bottom of your agenda.
  • Ask for a volunteer to read aloud to the group as the sentences come up.
  • State outcome. Think how we did that.Click.For the before we participated in a Think Aloud with the John Passage.Click.The purpose……ClickFor the during…..ClickThe purpose…..ClickFor the after….ClickThe purpose was….
  • Key points concerning the strategies:Two other instructional practices that are used in this lesson:Equity sticks (or equity cards) will be used to solicit responses from participants. The purpose for this strategy is to randomly select students for responses and participation. These strategies were selected with the purpose in mind. These strategies are the tools to help students reach the outcome(s).
  • Read the directions on the slide.Have participants respond on their own (2 minutes). Ask participants to meet with their left-brain partner to share their predictions (two minutes).Bring participants back together and ask participants to share whole group. Use Equity Sticks for selecting responses (two minutes).
  • Facilitator reads Chunk 1. “We will be discussing the term ‘adolescent’, and it is important to understand that children between the ages of 10-18 are considered adolescents.”As I read aloud, follow along, highlighting important facts or ideas. Then, record your student notes. Be sure to add a connection to your notes.Share your student notes with a partner.After the discussion, show the teacher notes on the next slide.
  • “These are possible notes . Notice that I used phrases that depicted my thoughts. An actual life example was made as a connection from the text to the real world.”Allow time for participants to add the teacher notes.Key lecture points:“Adolescents are developing the parts of the brain responsible for thoughtful, reflective reasoning and judgment; 7 to 10% of the brain is being pruned away. During this period they give little thought to their actions, they seek instant gratification and can’t see the importance of future consequences.This is the time when high stakes tests (Stanford -10, ARMT, and AHSGE) are given. Students place little value on these tests. Therefore, teachers are challenged to teach the standards using methods that will engage students in learning that is comprehensive and active.”
  • Follow instructions on the slide.Read chunk two. Then, record your student notes. Be sure to add a connection to your notes.Share your student notes with a partner.After the discussion, show the teacher notes on the next slide.
  • Read chunk three. Then, record your student notes. Be sure to add a connection to your notes.Share your student notes with a partner.After the discussion, show the teacher notes on the next slide.
  • Ask participants to revisit the anticipation guide.Follow the instructions on the slide.The teacher should walk around the room and check for understanding.Clear up any questions or misunderstandings during this time.After 2 minutes, bring the group back together.Discuss the answers and expound on the justifications.
  • Review the strategic teaching lesson.“You have just completed a strategic lesson on the Brain Research.”Now, let’s ‘back step’ the lesson. Was the outcome met? If so, what evidence do we have? 2) Do you recall our before strategy? Click. What was our purpose? Click. 3) Do you recall our during strategy? Click. What was our purpose? Click. 4) Do you recall our after strategy? Click. What was our purpose? Click. 5) Were all the strategies connected? If so, give some examples of those connections. 6) Were all students engaged? If so, what did the engagement look like? 7) Throughout the lesson, did you read? Write? Talk? Listen? Investigate? 8) Were opportunities to assess learning built in throughout the lesson? 9) Were you ever asked to leave the content to focus on reading skills? 10) At the end of the lesson, do both the teacher and the students have evidence of whether or not learning has occurred?
  • Break
  • Discuss the terms Strategic Teaching/Content Literacy.Content Literacy is what we hope to accomplish using the strategic teaching framework.Show the next 5 slides, and invite participants to make comments after each one.
  • Ask participants to reflect on the day by jotting questions, concerns, and/or comments on sticky notes and placing them on the Parking Lot.Explain that the facilitators will use these to assess the learning for the day, and they will be addressed in the morning.
  • Transcript

    • 1. •Best Practices for Content Literacy WES Content Literacy Training Summer 2012 Partners in Instruction1
    • 2. “I’m Here”byJohn WrightLEA Literacy CoachHuntsville City Schools 2
    • 3. I’m Trying…3
    • 4. I’m here… Even when it seems I’m not.4
    • 5. Class seems long when you don’t understand.5
    • 6. I’m trying to pay attention, But sometimes it’s hard.6
    • 7. I heard what she said… But I don’t know what she means.7
    • 8. I read like everyone else… But the words don’t always make sense.8
    • 9. I feeltrapped… Because reading is hard for me.9
    • 10. I try and follow the rules… Most of the time.10
    • 11. Things that seem easy to others… Don’t seem easy to me.11
    • 12. I feel alone… When I don’t12 understand.
    • 13. I get bored… When my work seems too hard.13
    • 14. I get confused… And I don’t know what to do.14
    • 15. Things move too fast; I can’t keep up.15
    • 16. Just because I struggle doesn’t mean I don’t care. All I need is… Help.16
    • 17. •Why does this matter? "On the 2010 dropout report, Alabama had 3,896 students drop out of school.“ Alabama State Dept. of Education “About one out of three (32%) of Alabama’s students who graduate and enroll in a public college or university requires remediation courses in reading.” Alabama Commission on Higher Education17
    • 18. •Why Does This Matter?“With one of the highest dropout rates, Alabama is not providing a quality education for all its citizens when so many of its youth are not participating. Also below national average, only 75.3% of the population 25 years and older have a high school diploma. This crisis in education threatens to impede further growth in Alabama because it hinders the goal of creating and maintaining a skilled, educated workforce, and saddles the state with the costs often associated with high school dropouts.” Counties in Crisis Assessing Quality of Life in Alabama 18
    • 19. •Research“Neglecting students’ literacy has seriouseconomic consequences for individuals andstates. Today, almost 40 percent of high schoolgraduates lack the reading and writing skills thatemployers seek, and almost a third of high schoolgraduates who enroll in college requireremediation. Deficits in basic skills cost thenation’s businesses, universities, and under-prepared high school graduates as much as $16billion annually in lost productivity and remedialcosts” (National Governor’s Association, 2005). 19
    • 20. •Components of a strategic lesson agendaDaily Outcome:By the end of this lesson, you will be able toidentify the components of a strategic lesson.Before: Anticipation GuideDuring: Jot NotesAfter: Anticipation Guide 20
    • 21. StrategicTeachingBefore: Anticipation Guide 21
    • 22. Strategic TeachingFrameworkDURING: Jot Notes 22
    • 23. •I do• Jot Notes• I do-Chunk One:• Strategic Teaching is not the random use of strategies. The purpose of strategic teaching is to make learning visible. 23
    • 24. •We do• Jot Notes• We do-Chunk Two:• Focus on standards and outcomes• Chunk the text and allow for student discussion• Include a Before, During, and After strategy 24
    • 25. •Y’all do• Jot Notes• Y’all do-Chunk Three 25
    • 26. •You do• JotNotes• You do-Chunk Four: 26
    • 27. •After: Anticipation guide• Reflection 27
    • 28. •Components of a strategic lesson agendaDaily Outcome:By the end of this lesson, you will be able to identify the components of a strategic lesson.Before: Anticipation GuidePurposes: Set purpose for reading the text, Build Background KnowledgeDuring: Jot NotesPurpose: Engage with Text, Self-Monitor ComprehensionAfter: Anticipation GuidePurposes: Reflect on the Content of the Lesson, Make connections with the text 28
    • 29. •Strategic Planning Agenda Outcome: Participants will discover the steps of planning strategic lessons. Before: Table Talk During: Margin Notes After: Paired Summarizing 29
    • 30. •Before: Table talk• Table Talk-Strategic Planning• Take one minute to read the question, reflect, and write and response.• Take one minute to share your response with a partner.• Take three minutes to share your responses with the table, chose one response to share with the entire group. 30
    • 31. •Table talk• Whatmust be determined prior to planning alesson? What is the first step in planning astrategic lesson? 31
    • 32. •During: Margin Notes• Choose a partner.• Read a chunk of text (each step is a chunk). After reading the chunk, write notes in margin about information that stands out to you.• Share your notes with a partner. 32
    • 33. Step 1: Determine the outcomesChunk 1: “I do” 33
    • 34. •Examples of Margin notes for Chunk One • Lessonplanning starts with the outcome-the outcome is what you want the students to be able to do. • Outcomes should move students to mastery of standards 34
    • 35. •Chunk 2: “We Do”• Read chunk two.• Write notes in the margins.• Share your notes with your partner. 35
    • 36. •Chunk 3: “Y’all Do” • Read chunk three. • Write notes in the margins. • Share your notes with your partner. 36
    • 37. •Chunk 4 – “YOU DO”• Read chunk four.• Write notes in the margins.• Share your notes with your partner. 37
    • 38. •After: Paired Summarizing• Write a brief summary of the text.• Trade papers with a partner. Read what your partner wrote, then write a brief summary of what they said. 38
    • 39. •Strategic Planning agendaOutcome: Participants will discover the steps of planning strategic lessons.Before: Table TalkPurposes: activate prior knowledge; establish a purpose for reading; build background knowledgeDuring:Margin NotesPurposes: engage with the text; enhance comprehension of written material through short readings and oral discussions; self-monitor comprehensionAfter:Paired SummarizingPurposes: summarize text, monitor comprehension 39
    • 40. Break 40
    • 41. What IsContent Literacy/Strategic Teaching All About? 41
    • 42. •What is Strategic Teaching?• Itis a process of incorporating active engagement and academic literacy into all lessons planned.• It requires explicit instruction.• The main focus is student learning. 42
    • 43. •Strategic Teaching As educators, we areineffective when ourstudents are activelyengaged in a meaninglesstask or passively involvedin a meaningful one. 43
    • 44. •Coding The TextAs you read the lesson plan Mrs. Jones, identify the components of a strategic lesson using the following codes:• (1) Student-Friendly Outcome(s)• (2) Examples of Chunking• (3B) Before Strategy, (3D) During Strategy , (3A) After Strategy• (4) Explicit Instruction (Also identify which step: I Do, We Do, Y’all Do, or You Do.)• (5) Active Literacy (Also identify which component: Talking, Writing, Investigating, Reading, Listening• (FA) Formative Assessment 44
    • 45. •Coding The TextAs you read the lesson plan Mr. Smith, identify the components of a strategic lesson using the following codes:• (1) Student-Friendly Outcome(s)• (2) Examples of Chunking• (3B) Before Strategy, (3D) During Strategy , (3A) After Strategy• (4) Explicit Instruction (Also identify which step: I Do, We Do, Y’all Do, or You Do.)• (5) Active Literacy (Also identify which component: Talking, Writing, Investigating, Reading, Listening• (FA) Formative Assessment 45
    • 46. •Discussion• How do they compare? 46
    • 47. •Lesson Plans• Wetumpka Elementary Lesson Plan Template 47
    • 48. •Parking Lot PostingsReflect on the learning from the day: • Questions • Concerns • Comments The purpose is to let the facilitators see whether or not learning has taken place. 48