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Current Issues In Drug Metabolism
 

Current Issues In Drug Metabolism

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  • Major consequence of bioactivation is in fact bioinactivation
  • Mjajorr consequence of bioactivation is in fact bioinactivation
  • Most common consequence of bioactivation is in fact bioinactivation
  • The lone pair of electrons attack the central carbon forming a bond between the oxygen and the carbon. This causes the electrons from the double bond to move back to the oxygen atom.This causes a bond to be formed between the oxygen and C forming a 5 member ring. The electrons from the O- fall back to the central carbon, resulting in an electron shift to the oxygen above it. This results in the bond breaking, and the acyl group moving around the ring.The lone pair of electrons on the OH group attach the C-OH bond, resulting in a shift of electrons back to the O atom in the ring. This then causes the ring to open and a double bond to be formed between the C=O. This bond is susceptible to attack from a the nucleophillic NH2 group of a protein, resulting in the protein binding to the carbon atom, and separating the =O bond into a single –Oh2 bond. This OH2 is a good leaving group and the +ve charge pulls electrons towards it, resulting in the loss of the group from the molecule. The electrons from NH are pulled towards the carbon, resulting in a C=N bond, and the loss of a hydrogen, which moves to the ring.The Hydrogen that moves to the ring, has a lone pair of electrons which attack the C-C bond, resulting in the formation of a double bond, with electons being pulled up from the C=N.A lone pair of electrons then is pulled towards the C on the ring, causing a C=O bond to be formed. A proton is also pulled into the structure by the double bond, resulting in the loss of the double bond, and stabilization of the adduct.NH3+ does not have a loan pair of electrons, and hence is unable to form adducts with acyl glucuronides. Usually in physiological conditions, proteins are in the state of containing NH3+ however other amino acids on the protein are able to interact with the NH3+ group, reverting it to the NH2 with the lone pair, resulting in adduct formation

Current Issues In Drug Metabolism Current Issues In Drug Metabolism Presentation Transcript