Jane Jacobs by Lindsey Mathews Padrino
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Jane Jacobs by Lindsey Mathews Padrino

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Jane Jacobs by Lindsey Mathews Padrino Jane Jacobs by Lindsey Mathews Padrino Presentation Transcript

  • Jane Jacobs: A courageous and innovative thinker, doer and “aligner”
    Lindsey Mathews Padrino
    Leadership Bio, Total Leadership, Spring 2011
  • Jane Jacobs was a wife, mother, activist, writer and thinker.
    A remarkable woman not just for the impact she has had on city planners – and cities – for more than half a century, but also for the journey she took in order to have that impact.
    She took great joy in everyday life and had a voracious intellectual curiosity.
    However, she was also someone who carefully defined joy, learning and knowledge for herself – never letter societal norms do that for her.
  • Jacobs’s career formed organically out of the things in life that fascinated her and the values that motivated her.
    Her knowledge and motivation came from the things she did everyday to take care of her family and the her conversations with her husband prompted him to push her to write her book.
    Jane at White Horse Tavern
  • “At a time when both common and inspired wisdom called for bulldozing slums and opening up city space, Ms. Jacobs's prescription was ever more diversity, density and dynamism — in effect, to crowd people and activities together in a jumping, joyous urban jumble.”
    -NYTimes Obituary, 2006
  • “Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.”
    Jacobs’s four principles for a city as a vibrant system and maintaining a “sidewalk ballet:”
    A street or district must serve several primary functions.
    Blocks must be short.
    Buildings must vary in age, condition, use and rentals.
    Population must be dense.
  • David vs. Goliath circa 1968: Robert Moses, the famous New York City ‘Big Bob the Builder’, decided to build a highway through Lower Manhattan and Jane’s own neighborhood.
    Jacobs mobilized people in her neighborhood around her vision and successfully created enough political opposition to halt the construction of the highway and save several neighborhoods.
  • Her career formed organically out of the things in life that fascinated her and the values that motivated her.
    Her knowledge and motivation came from the things she did everyday to take care of her family and the her conversations with her husband prompted him to push her to write her book.
    This extraordinary alignment of her personal values and interests, care for her community, investment in her family, erupted into a career that almost perfectly encapsulated her other three key life domains.