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some references to use adjectives with chilean footballers

some references to use adjectives with chilean footballers

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  • 1. Unit 68: Adjectives Adjectives describe nouns. We separate them with a comma: A handsome, young, French student. When there is more than one adjective we place them in this order: Value – size – age – shape – colour – nationality – material – noun
  • 2.
    • Value: wondeful, valuable
    • Size: large, small, tall
    • Age: new, young, antique
    • Shape: square, round
    • Colour: yellow, blue
    • Nationality: French, Chilean
    • Material: brick, plastic
    • Noun: house, student
  • 3. Unit 73: Adverbs of frequency
    • Some adverbs answer the question: how often / how frequently?
    • 100%: always
    • 90%: usually
    • 80%: normally/ generally
    • 70%: often / frequently
    • 30%:sometimes / occasionally
    • 10%: seldom / rarely
    • 5%: hardly ever
    • 0%: never
  • 4. Position of adverbs:
    • After the verb be: she’s usually at home
    • Before the main verb: He often travels by bus
    • Between the auxiliary verb (has have, will, must, can, may, etc.) and the main verb:
    • he must often work late.
  • 5. Use of adverbs:
    • We use never and hardly ever with a positive verb not with a negative verb:
    • I have never met Alexis Sánchez
    • We use ever in questions and in negative sentences:
    • Have you ever been with Matías González?
    • We can use every day, every week, once a month to answer the question ‘how often?’ They go at the end of the sentence: I visit Gary twice a year.
  • 6.
    • We can also place: sometimes, occasionally, normally, usually, often, frequently, everyday, once a month at the beggining of the sentence:
    • Sometimes, I dream of being a footballer…
  • 7. Unit 74: Comparative of adjectives
    • How to form comparatives?
    • adjectives of one syllable, add er: old – older
    • But if the adjective ends in –e we add only –r : late – later
    • If the adjective ends in a vowel sandwich(cons/vow/cons) we double the final consonant: big - bigger
  • 8.
    • With adjectives of two or more syllables, we use more before the adjective: more beautiful
    • But some adjectives are irregular:
    • good – better
    • bad – worse
    • far – further / farther
    • many/much – more
    • little – less
    • We often use elder for brothers and sisters: Margaret is my elder sister
  • 9.
    • We use a comparative adjective + than + the second item to compare two people, animals or groups or things:
    • The shops are more expensive in London than in Talca
    • If we use a personal pronoun after than, we use the object pronoun: Mark is quicker than me.
    • Less is the opposite of more. We use it with an adjective to compate two people, animals, things or groups: The English are less friendly than the Chileans
  • 10.
    • We often use comparative adjectives with possessive pronouns: mine, yours, his, hers, ours, theirs: His house is larger than mine
    • We can use a bit/a little/slightly/a lot/far/much + a comparative adjective to say how much bigger/better/more beautiful etc. Someone or something is:
    • car A costs $3m. Car B costs $3.2m
    • This car is slightly more expensive than that one
  • 11. Unit 80: adjectives with –ed and –ing
    • We use them to describe the emotion of a person: I was very interested in the match
    • Common –ed and –ing adjectives:
  • 12.
    • How did you feel?
    • Amused
    • Bored
    • Disappointed
    • Embarrassed
    • Fascinated
    • Interested
    • Surprised
    • Thrilled
    • annoyed
    • What was it like?
    • Amusing
    • Boring
    • Disappointing
    • Embarrassing
    • Fascinating
    • Interesting
    • Surprising
    • Thrilling
    • annoying
  • 13.
    • Confused
    • Disgusted
    • Excited
    • Frightened
    • Relaxed
    • Terrified
    • tired
    • Confusing
    • Disgusting
    • Exciting
    • Frightening
    • Relaxing
    • Terrifying
    • tiring
  • 14.
    • We usually use be or feel with –ed adjectives. We often use get with bored/tired:
    • I was fascinated with the game
    • I got bored at the match
  • 15. Let’s practice!
    • http://www.englisch-hilfen.de/en/exercises_list/alle_grammar.htm