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  • Toronto is the world’s 4th mots livable city in the world In 2013 the City of Toronto, Economic Development Committee cited the following for Toronto:
    • The world’s 4th most livable city.
    • One of the best North American cities for business investment in the category of
    “Overall North American Cities of the Future 2013/14.
    • 10th in the 2025 City Competitiveness Index, which benchmarks the competitiveness
    of 120 cities across the world.
    • 6th in an overall comparison of 24 global metropolises, based on combined results
    of 33 economic and labour attractiveness indicators.
    • One of the world’s top seven intelligent communities of 2013, for creating local
    prosperity and inclusion using broadband and information technology to attract
    leading-edge businesses, build skills, generate economic growth, and improve the
    delivery of government services.
  • The age structure of Toronto’s population is changing. Toronto has a higher proportion of
    the population in the 25-44 age group compared to Durham, Peel and York. This is an
    indicator that Toronto continues to attract people locally, nationally and internationally by
    providing a range of economic and educational opportunities. The share of Toronto youth
    (15-24 years old) in the GTA is about 41% and the share of working age population (25-
    64 years old) is 44%. Census data show that since 2006, Toronto has continued to gain
    older adults. Projections made by City of Toronto indicate that this population will increase
    by one-third between 2011 and 2031.
  • Routes TO. Employment is a Citizenship and Immigration Canada Contribution Agreement with the Toronto Workforce Innovation Group. The project began in April 2011.
    The project was conceived as a result of consultations with employment service delivery representatives working with newcomers who noted the lack of Toronto-specific labour market information to help their clients find jobs and/or appropriate training/education programs. A federal task force on LMI reported that LMI was fragmented and not meeting the needs of job seekers or the intermediaries working with job seekers. Routes TO. Employment is an attempt to centralize information of key sectors in Toronto and make it useful and accessible.
  • 10 job sectors: Financial services; construction; Professional & Technical Services; Retail; Manufacturing; Health Care; Arts, Culture and Entertainment; Tourism and Hospitality; Information & Communication; Non-profit
  • 10 job sectors: Financial services; construction; Professional & Technical Services; Retail; Manufacturing; Health Care; Arts, Culture and Entertainment; Tourism and Hospitality; Information & Communication; Non-profit
  • As baby boomers prepare to retire over the next five to ten years, it is estimated that 40 percent of current tradespeople will need to be
    replaced. This will have an immediate impact on Canada’s infrastructure. The crisis associated with critical shortages of skilled workers makes it imperative that government, educators and industry work together as partners and utilize a cohesive approach in solving the problem of skilled worker shortages and do everything possible to attract women to the skilled trades and technologies.
    Federal Skilled Trades Program was launched in January 2013. It helps to facilitate the immigration of skilled tradespeople to Canada. Applicants are selected according to criteria geared towards practical training and work experience rather than on formal education.
    Routes to Trade is our attempt to tackle the issue and help people understand what it takes to become a skilled trade person.
  • Why do we want to pave a new route?
    And why Routes TO Trades?

    Reasons:
    The two fastest-growing groups in our population are aboriginals and new immigrants.

    Everything we do is heavily laden with technology even down to drywall installation (James Knight, the president of the Association of Canadian Community College)

  • At a local level, an emerging green economy initiatives, largely focused on clean energy and better transportation infrastructure, are directly tied to Toronto’s construction industry

    Green building initiatives ….All projects are tied to City’s Climate Change Action Plan, an aggressive environmental framework aimed at reducing Toronto’s greenhouse gas emissions by 80 per cent by 2050.
    As of March 2014
    Projects Completed:2,239 Employment Created: 31, 546 Project Investment: $711 million
    MAYOR’S TOWER RENEWAL
    The Mayor’s Tower Renewal program targets the environmental sustainability of  Toronto’s many aging towers. Currently in its pilot phase, there are [pilots sites located across Toronto, which will produce energy efficiency and the overall environmental impact of the towers.
    TORONTO GREEN STANDARDS (TGS)
    A set of ‘made-in-Toronto’ measures for sustainable development. Achieving the TGS performance measures will help meet the City’s Climate Change Action Plan, while improving air and water quality, and enhancing the natural environment.
    WATER EFFICIENCY AND REBATE PROGRAM
    A group of  incentive programs provided by the City of Toronto for multi-unit residential, commercial, industrial and institutional buildings to reduce water consumption. These include Commercial Washer Rebate Programs and others.
    ECO-ROOF INCENTIVE PROGRAM
    Designed to promote the use of green and cool roofs on Toronto’s commercial, industrial and institutional buildings, and to help Toronto’s business community take action on climate change.
    The Eco-Roof Incentive Program complements the City’s Green Roof Bylaw,which applies to new building permit applications for residential, commercial and institutional development made after January 31, 2010, and will apply to new industrial development as of January 31, 2011.
    TORONTO ATMOSPHERIC FUND (TAF)
    Designed to help the City of Toronto pursue its goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve air quality, TAF serves as an “incubator” and “accelerator” of great ideas to address climate change that often face significant obstacles.

    (2) Metrolinx Expansion GTHA
    Focus is on building infrastructure in/around ‘Mobility hubs’, key intersections in the regional rapid transit network that provide commuters with  access to the transportation system, support high density development, and demonstrate excellence in customer service. * There are three within the vicinity of Toronto West( Jane-Eglinton, Eglinton- Mt. Dennis, Eglinton-West)


    (3) TTC Expansion, Toronto-York Subway Expansion
    Project spans across the following neighbourhoods: Downsview-Wilson Heights, Downsview-Sheppard, Keele-Finch, York University, Vaughan Metropolitan Centre)

  • (2) Metrolinx Expansion GTHA
    Focus is on building infrastructure in/around ‘Mobility hubs’, key intersections in the regional rapid transit network that provide commuters with  access to the transportation system, support high density development, and demonstrate excellence in customer service. * There are three within the vicinity of Toronto West( Jane-Eglinton, Eglinton- Mt. Dennis, Eglinton-West)

  • (3) TTC Expansion, Toronto-York Subway Expansion
    Project spans across the following neighbourhoods: Downsview-Wilson Heights, Downsview-Sheppard, Keele-Finch, York University, Vaughan Metropolitan Centre)
  • Job security and stability are the norm in skilled trades and technology fields as
    the need for this work never decreases. The trades are booming, so it is relatively easy to get a job. Skilled
    trades workers are highly employable and in demand! Jobs in the skilled trades or technical
    fields offer wages averaging between
    $14 and $54+ an hour and often include medical and retirement benefits. The skilled trades and technologies
    develop competencies that are valued by a wide cross-section of employers,
    including problem-solving, precision, dexterity, cooperation and project management skills. There is a realistic opportunity to
    advance one’s career in the skilled trades, from apprentice to journeyperson,
    supervisor, union leader, manager, educator or business owner. It is not uncommon for the skilled
    trades to be self-run businesses where people set their own hours and their own hourly rates. Such flexibility and independence provides the opportunity to sustain home-life balance and address childcare issues.


  • Lets clarify the paradox with skilled trades:

    To begin, a “pardox” is a situation, person, or thing that combines contradictory features or qualities.

    We often assume:
    In order to work in the skilled trades and technologies, one needs to have a solid grounding in many “school-based” skills such as math, analytical abilities and literacy. The skilled tradesperson also needs to be imaginative, resourceful and dexterous and have the ability to figure out specifications and requirements in real-world applications.

    Yes, Intelligence and aptitude are essential components of working in these careers, BUT are as respectable and important as those requiring a purely academic background. In fact, Tradeability.ca points out “The skilled trades, while they still involve ‘work’, physical work, are at the same time getting highly technical, and the math and science competencies needed are high. The minimum education requirement is generally Grade 12. More and more employers are looking for young people who bring passion, dedication and intelligence to the workplace”. The skilled trades today are one of the pillars of post-secondary education, the others being college and university,
  • Centralized labour market information designed to guide newcomers, immigrants and internationally educated professionals into commensurate employment opportunities.
  • Centralized labour market information designed to guide newcomers, immigrants and internationally educated professionals into commensurate employment opportunities.

Transcript

  • 1. Routes TO. Trades: Paving pathways to Skilled Trades in Toronto’s labour market
  • 2. Local Labour Force Characteristics
  • 3. Part 1: Key Employment Pathways
  • 4. Routes TO. Employment Trends, tips and tools for newcomers www.routestoemployment.ca
  • 5. • 10 job sectors • Key facts about the sector • Labour force information (demographic, age profile, educational attainment) • Sample list of trending jobs o Entry level, Middle level, Senior level • List of Educational and Training options • List of Professional Associations • List of Evaluation of credentials What is included
  • 6. What is included • INSERT MULTIMEDIA DEMO
  • 7. Part 2: Re-emerging labour market pathways, Skilled Trades
  • 8. The big picture: Ontario • The Canadian Chamber of Commerce estimates there will be 550 000 workers who won’t be able to find work by 2016 • There will be 1. 5 million skilled job vacancies in 2016 and 2.6 million by 2021 • High tech skills are becoming prerequisite for many jobs 10
  • 9. Local opportunities: Toronto (1) Green building initiatives: o Tower Renewal o Toronto Green Standards o Water Efficiency and Rebate Program o Eco-roof incentive Program o Toronto Atmospheric Fund Source: City of Toronto, Building Better Partnerships; Canada Green Skills Building Council-GTA Chapter, Green Building Map
  • 10. Local opportunities: Toronto (2) Metrolinx Expansion Source: Metrolinx, Mobility hubs
  • 11. Local opportunities: Toronto (3) TTC Expansion, Toronto- York Subway Expansion o Downsview-Wilson Heights o Downsview-Sheppard o Keele-Finch o York University o Vaughan Metropolitan Centre Source: TTC, Construction Activity Map
  • 12. Construction trades in demand • Carpenters • Ironworkers • Millwrights • Industrial mechanics • Electricians • Plumbers • Sheet metal workers • Pipefitters • Welders
  • 13. Real value in Skilled Trades? MYTHS REALITY •Skilled trade jobs are not creative •Skilled trades jobs are not important •Skilled trades is no place for a woman •Skilled trades jobs for students who do not excel in academics • Build, design fix and create – the new motto for trades people • The foundation, infrastructure and operation of the communities are dependent on the skilled trades • 97% of skilled trades jobs are full time. Women represent 50% of the workforce and need to focus on job demand • Intelligence and aptitude are essential components of working in those careers
  • 14. Of trade school grads working within 6 months
  • 15. Construction jobs that will be need filling in the next decade
  • 16. Paradox? •12.1%Trade certificate •25.9%University degree
  • 17. Part 3: Mapping ‘Routes TO. Trades’
  • 18. • Job description • Main duties • Testimonials • Common Job Titles • Wages and Benefits • Requirements • Occupational outlook Routes TO. Trades: What is included
  • 19. • Insert multimedia Routes TO. Trades: How to navigate
  • 20. Routes TO. Trades: Promising job hunting practices Learn about the local economy & building initatives Make strategic employment decisions Utilize appropriate employment & community services to bridge the training/skills gap
  • 21. For more Labour market information www.workforceinnovation.ca www.routestoemployment.ca www.routestotrades.ca 215 Spadina Avenue, Suite 350 Toronto, ON M5T 2C7 Phone: 416 934 1653 Fax: 416 934 1653 Thank You