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  • Total OSS- 13,013 in 2004: 8323 in 2005 (4,690 decrease-36%)
  • 352 in 2004/364 in 2005
  • In 2004 and 2005, Black or Latino juveniles account for 68% - 76% of the total number of juvenile referrals. Total 1430 in 2004 Total 1359 in 2005
  • In 2004 and 2005, Black or Latino juveniles account for 70% - 74% of the juveniles with complaints. Total 915 in 2004 Total 870 in 2005
  • For each year, this represents more than 1.75 times their percentage population in the county (42% - 44%).

Transcript

  • 1.
    • Understanding Disproportionate Minority Contact in Forsyth County
    • Forsyth County DMC Community Briefing
    • November, 2006
  • 2. Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC)
    • “ the disproportionate number of juvenile members of ethnic minority groups who come into contact with the juvenile justice system ”
    • -Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention Act 2002
  • 3. DMC in North Carolina
    • In partnership with the North Carolina Governor’s Crime Commission, four demonstration counties were selected to address DMC:
    • Forsyth, Guilford, Union, and New Hanover
  • 4. The Process
    • Identify the extent of DMC in each county
    • Assess contributing factors to the problem
    • Develop and implement strategic interventions to reduce DMC
    • Evaluate the effectiveness of these strategies
  • 5. Study Design
    • Aggregate Analysis
    • Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools
    • Winston-Salem Police Department
    • Forsyth County Juvenile Justice
  • 6.
    • Sample Analysis
    • Forsyth County Juvenile Justice
    • Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools
    • Department of Social Services
    • CenterPoint - Mental Health
    Study Design
  • 7. Incidence Rate (IR)
    • A percentage that represents the number of incidents for each ethnic category divided by the total number of youth for that ethnic category, multiplied by 100.
  • 8. Relative Rate Index (RRI)
    • A ratio of the incidence rate for an ethnic minority group to the incidence rate for white youth.
  • 9. Aggregate Analysis
  • 10. Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools 2003-2004 Suspensions 23.7% of suspensions were received by white youth. 76.3% of suspensions were received by minority youth. RRI – 3.2
  • 11. Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools 2004-2005 Suspensions 19.8% of Suspensions were received by white youth. 81% of suspensions were received by minority youth. RRI – 3.9
  • 12. Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools 2003-2004 and 2004- 2005 Out of School Suspensions by ethnicity Although OSS decreased overall in 2004- 2005 from the previous year, minority students received more OSS than white students both years in all grade levels.
  • 13. Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 Out of School Suspensions by ethnicity and gender RRI-OSS Comparisons Elementary Middle High Male Female Male Female Male Female Minority students were between 3.4 and 7.9 times as likely to be suspended during these two years. 6.0 5.1 6.9 5.4 7.5 4.1 2004-05 5.1 3.6 6.2 3.4 7.9 5.0 2003-04
  • 14. Winston-Salem Police Department Juvenile Arrest Complaints* July 1, 2003-June 30, 2004 and July 1, 2004-June 30, 2005 Minority youth account for between 77% and 78.9% of all juveniles with arrest charges. * Ages 6-15
  • 15. Winston-Salem Police Department Juveniles With Arrest Complaints* 2003-2004 Arrest Charges Minority youth were 6 times as likely to have arrest charges than white youth. * Ages 6-15
  • 16. Winston-Salem Police Department Juvenile With Arrest Complaints* 2004-2005 Arrest Charges Minority youth were 5 times as likely to have arrest charges than white youth. * Ages 6-15
  • 17. Forsyth County DJJDP Referrals 2004 - 2005* *ages 10- 17 61% 7% 29% 68% 8% 23%
  • 18. Forsyth County DJJDP Complaints 2004 - 2005* *ages 10- 17 64% 6% 28% 8% 66% 24%
  • 19. Forsyth County DJJDP Referrals and Complaints 2004 - 2005*
    • For each year, minority referrals and complaints represent more than 1.75 times their percentage population in the county (42% - 44%).
    *ages 10- 17
  • 20. Forsyth County DJJDP Referrals & Complaints 2004 - 2005 For both years, minority youth are more than four times as likely as white youth to be referred to juvenile court or to have a complaint filed with juvenile court as white youth, but they are almost equally likely to have complaints approved or not approved as white youth. Relative Rate Index Comparisons 1.06 1.15 4. Complaints Not Approved .96 .94 3. Approved Complaints 4.37 4.29 2. Juvenile Complaints 4.20 4.55 1. Juvenile Referrals 2005 2004 Category
  • 21. Random Sample Analysis
  • 22. Forsyth County Juvenile Justice and Adjudication
    • RRI comparisons of juvenile justice disposition decisions suggest greater applications of equitable standards across race.
  • 23. Winston-Salem/ Forsyth County School Absences and Drop Outs 50% of the white youth and 41% of the minority youth sampled had been truant. Minority and white youth were equally likely not to be enrolled or to have no record. All youth who had dropped out were African-American (7 youth).
  • 24. Child Protection and Social Assistance Minority youth were 1.71 times as likely to have received food stamps or public assistance than white youth, equally likely to have received both, and 1.45 times as likely to have received both in addition to child welfare services.
  • 25. Mental Health 23 of the 100 youth had active case files with mental health services. The RRI comparison indicates little disparity between ethnicities. 23% 23 TOTAL n/a 100% 1 Multi Race n/a 100% 1 Native American .88 22.1% 15 African American 25% 6 White RRI Percentage of Population # of youth Ethnicity
  • 26. National Scan of DMC Best Practices
  • 27. Strategies for Success
    • Forming successful collaboratives comprised of committed policy makers and effective collaborative management to commit to the DMC Committees;
    • Routine, uniform data collection;
    • Agency commitment of personnel toward DMC Committee participation and related issues;
    • Effective evaluation of intervention programming.
  • 28. Conclusions
    • DMC is most prevalent in school system and within law enforcement juvenile contacts.
    • DMC is less of an issue with juvenile justice decision processes.
    • Further inquiry is required in order to draw conclusions about any trends or patterns of DMC in the systems of child welfare and protective services and mental health.
  • 29. Conclusions (cont.)
    • Regardless of ethnicity, education, child welfare and mental health systemic processes are important to the positive outcomes for adjudicated youth.
    • Effectively reducing DMC will take committed policy makers, community members and agencies working together in a focused, data-driven process to ensure that appropriate interventions can be implemented and sustained.
  • 30.
    • For more information or a copy of the full report, please contact Forsyth Futures at (336)724-2831 or [email_address] , or go to www.centerforcommunitysafety.org.