The other day I played a typing game on popcap.com…
I got really far and did really well, and there came a
point where I g...
Then I played Bookworm on the same site.
I quit when I saw that I was fighting the tide.
People are amazing pattern matching
machines.
Look at the places we can find a face
In fact, we tend to
see patterns where
there aren’t any
When we grasp a pattern, we usually
get bored with it and iconify it
When we meet noise, and fail toWhen we meet noise, and fail to
make a pattern out of it, we getmake a pattern out of it, w...
Once we see a pattern, we delight in
tracing it, and in
seeing it reoccur
What’s fun is exercising your brain
Games are puzzles
—they are about cognition,
and learning to analyze patterns
When you’re playing a game,
you’ll only play it
until you master the pattern
once you’ve mastered it
The game becomes boring.
Basically, all games are edutainment
Some games
teach
spatial relationships
Some gamesSome games teach you toteach you to
exploreexplore
Some games teachSome games teach
you how toyou how to
aim preciselyaim precisely
We’re very good at seeing past fiction.
This is why gamers are dismissive of the
ethical implications of games - They
don’...
They see a power-up.
As critics of games, of
course, we can see other
patterns.
Players seeking to advance in a game
will always try to optimize what they are
doing.
If they are clever and see
an optimal path—an
Alexandrine solution to a
Gordian problem—they’ll
do that instead of the
“in...
They will try to make theThey will try to make the gameplaygameplay asas
predictable as possible.predictable as possible.
...
In the real world, we call this “security”
and “steady jobs” and “sensible shoes”
and “routine.”
Call it a treadmill, if y...
As gamemakers, we are fighting a losing
battle against the human brain, which
always fights to optimize, assembly-
line, s...
If I were Will Wright, I’d say that “Fun is
the process of discovering areas in a
possibility
space.”
Most long-lasting games in the past
have been competitive, because they
lead to an endless supply of similar yet
subtly va...
Instanced spaces in massively
multiplayer games are a
designer’s attempt to maintain
control over the puzzles that
players...
Larger minimum feature sets
in online worlds are about
increasing the permutations,
the possibility space.
We talk so much about emergent
gameplay, non-linear storytelling, or
about player-entered content.
They’re all ways of inc...
We also often discuss the desire for
games to be art—for them to be
puzzles with more than one right
answer, puzzles that ...
That may be the best definition of when
something
ceases to
be craft
and when it
turns into
art
——the point at which it becomes subjectthe point at which it becomes subject
to interpretation.to interpretation.
We do happen to have various puzzles
and conundra that are like this.
Try writing a book.
Or composing music.
Or understanding your significant other.
Or designing games.
The point at which our game puzzles
approach the complexity of those
puzzles is the point at which our art
form becomes ma...
The gap
between those
who want
games to
entertain and
those who want
games to be art
does not exist.
Because both entail posing questions—
tough ones even, ethical ones, even. And
games will never be
mature as long as the
d...
Even then, there will a class of player
who prefers the comfort of only tackling
puzzles they know how to solve.
In the caveman days, the wolves got ‘em.
These days, we’re a bit more
tolerant—the job market gets them
instead.
So the challenge we all face is
to solve our own puzzles that
don’t have one right
answer (PvP,
instancing,
player-
entere...
Until then, all
our games
are destined
to be like tic-
tac-toe.
Child’s play because the patterns are
too easily perceived.
Teoria gier i funu
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Teoria gier i funu

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Transcript of "Teoria gier i funu"

  1. 1. The other day I played a typing game on popcap.com… I got really far and did really well, and there came a point where I got bored.
  2. 2. Then I played Bookworm on the same site. I quit when I saw that I was fighting the tide.
  3. 3. People are amazing pattern matching machines.
  4. 4. Look at the places we can find a face
  5. 5. In fact, we tend to see patterns where there aren’t any
  6. 6. When we grasp a pattern, we usually get bored with it and iconify it
  7. 7. When we meet noise, and fail toWhen we meet noise, and fail to make a pattern out of it, we getmake a pattern out of it, we get frustrated and quitfrustrated and quit
  8. 8. Once we see a pattern, we delight in tracing it, and in seeing it reoccur
  9. 9. What’s fun is exercising your brain
  10. 10. Games are puzzles
  11. 11. —they are about cognition,
  12. 12. and learning to analyze patterns
  13. 13. When you’re playing a game,
  14. 14. you’ll only play it
  15. 15. until you master the pattern
  16. 16. once you’ve mastered it
  17. 17. The game becomes boring.
  18. 18. Basically, all games are edutainment
  19. 19. Some games teach spatial relationships
  20. 20. Some gamesSome games teach you toteach you to exploreexplore
  21. 21. Some games teachSome games teach you how toyou how to aim preciselyaim precisely
  22. 22. We’re very good at seeing past fiction. This is why gamers are dismissive of the ethical implications of games - They don’t see “get a from a hooker, then run her over.”
  23. 23. They see a power-up.
  24. 24. As critics of games, of course, we can see other patterns.
  25. 25. Players seeking to advance in a game will always try to optimize what they are doing.
  26. 26. If they are clever and see an optimal path—an Alexandrine solution to a Gordian problem—they’ll do that instead of the “intended gameplay.”
  27. 27. They will try to make theThey will try to make the gameplaygameplay asas predictable as possible.predictable as possible. Which then means it becomes boring, and not fun.
  28. 28. In the real world, we call this “security” and “steady jobs” and “sensible shoes” and “routine.” Call it a treadmill, if you want.
  29. 29. As gamemakers, we are fighting a losing battle against the human brain, which always fights to optimize, assembly- line, simplify, maximize ROI.
  30. 30. If I were Will Wright, I’d say that “Fun is the process of discovering areas in a possibility space.”
  31. 31. Most long-lasting games in the past have been competitive, because they lead to an endless supply of similar yet subtly varied puzzles.
  32. 32. Instanced spaces in massively multiplayer games are a designer’s attempt to maintain control over the puzzles that players are solving
  33. 33. Larger minimum feature sets in online worlds are about increasing the permutations, the possibility space.
  34. 34. We talk so much about emergent gameplay, non-linear storytelling, or about player-entered content. They’re all ways of increasing the possibility space, making self- refreshing puzzles.
  35. 35. We also often discuss the desire for games to be art—for them to be puzzles with more than one right answer, puzzles that lend themselves to interpretation.
  36. 36. That may be the best definition of when something ceases to be craft and when it turns into art
  37. 37. ——the point at which it becomes subjectthe point at which it becomes subject to interpretation.to interpretation.
  38. 38. We do happen to have various puzzles and conundra that are like this. Try writing a book.
  39. 39. Or composing music.
  40. 40. Or understanding your significant other.
  41. 41. Or designing games.
  42. 42. The point at which our game puzzles approach the complexity of those puzzles is the point at which our art form becomes mature.
  43. 43. The gap between those who want games to entertain and those who want games to be art does not exist.
  44. 44. Because both entail posing questions— tough ones even, ethical ones, even. And games will never be mature as long as the designers create them with complete answers to their own puzzles in mind.
  45. 45. Even then, there will a class of player who prefers the comfort of only tackling puzzles they know how to solve.
  46. 46. In the caveman days, the wolves got ‘em.
  47. 47. These days, we’re a bit more tolerant—the job market gets them instead.
  48. 48. So the challenge we all face is to solve our own puzzles that don’t have one right answer (PvP, instancing, player- entered content!)
  49. 49. Until then, all our games are destined to be like tic- tac-toe.
  50. 50. Child’s play because the patterns are too easily perceived.

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