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A Short Intro to Public Relations
 

A Short Intro to Public Relations

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Lecture #1 in the PR module taught in LIT-Clonmel.

Lecture #1 in the PR module taught in LIT-Clonmel.

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  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1 By mastering the module in Public Relations, you will get a comprehensive summary of public relations concepts, theory, principles, history, management and practises. You will learn that public relations helps our complex, pluralistic society to reach decisions and function more effectively by contributing to mutual understanding among groups and institutions. It serves to bring private and public policies into harmony. You will learn strategic skills that are needed to assist an organisation in its communication with key stakeholders. Public relations serves a wide variety of institutions in society such as businesses, trade unions, government agencies, voluntary associations, foundations, hospitals, schools, colleges and religious institutions. To achieve their goals, these institutions must develop effective relationships with m any different audiences or publics such as employees, members, customers, local communities, shareholders, and with society at large. The management of institutions needs to understand the attitudes and values of their publics in order to achieve institutional goals. The goals themselves are shaped by the external environment. The public relations practitioner acts as a counselor to management and as a mediator, helping to translate private aims into reasonable policy actions that can be distributed by the media.
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1 Audiences: Types and typologies of publics, defining public opinion, factors determining public attitudes, surveys and polls, identifying publics, persuasion, the significance of the public in PR. Best Practise: budgetary considerations, event management, internal versus external PR With the media: choosing the right media and message, communicating through advertising, generating publicity, controlled versus uncontrolled media, types of communication, electronic broadcast media, spinning the news, strategies for dealing with media, planning issues for media management. PR research: the role of research in PR, research techniques and strategies, internal versus external research, probability, data collection, analysis, conduction polls. The PR campaign: planning a campaign, writing a press release, presentation and format, structure, stylistic requirements, the opening paragraph, preparing press packs, monitoring effectiveness. Ethics and professional issues: codes of conduct, government regulation Casebook: evaluation of a variety of campaigns, including low-impact campaigns mounted during course.
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1 Public relations is about reputation—the result of what you do, what you say and what others say about you. PR is the discipline which looks after reputation, with the aim of earning understanding and support and influencing opinion and behaviour. It is the planned and sustain effort to establish and maintain goodwill and mutual understanding between an organisation and its publics. “ Organisation” can be a governmental body, a business, a profession, a public service or a body concerned with health, culture, education. “ Publics” are audiences that are important to the organisation. They include customers, existing and potential, employees and management, investors, media, government, suppliers and thought leaders. “ Understanding” is a two-way process. To be effective, an organisation needs to listen to the opinions of those with whom it deals and not solely provide information. Issuing a barrage of propaganda is not enough.
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1 Awareness: the most common, some would say most effective, and certainly almost universal function of public relations activity is to make people aware in some way of an organisation’s products, services, technologies and position. Education: The best customer is an educated customer. Public relations is a particularly effective tool for educating markets about new technologies. Credibility: A key benefit of public relations as a communications medium is that it has a high degree of credibility in the mind of the receiver when compared with other marketing communications channels. Third party endorsement: An important driver of this credibility is that the message originates from and is therefore endorsed by a third party. Frequently journalists fill this niche. A good article in a trade publication is not only read but it is believed and the more credible the publication, the more credible the message. Permission to buy: Consumers are no longer content to rely purely on product performance. They also need to be reassured that they are happy to do business with the organisation providing the product or service. Differentiation: Once the market has been educated, interest has been generated in a technology or product category and awareness of brand established, public relations messages need to differentiate the client’s brand from that of the competitors. Positioning: Differentiation is delivered through positioning, but positioning is not only to do with the product or service on offer, rather it is about differentiating the product in the mind of the prospect and is therefore best achieved by high credibility communications. Relationship marketing: Modern marketing is more about relationships than transactions and public relations’ orientation is building relationships through communication that is two-way and informal in style.
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1 Push strategy: involves directing effort at intermediaries so that they are motivated to direct their promotional efforts at customers, thereby pushing the product down the distribution channel. Pull strategy: Involves aiming promotional activities at end users so that they demand the product from intermediaries, thereby pulling the product down the distribution channel. Pass strategy: Applies when there is a need to enter markets blocked or protected by parties other than end users. Examples of pass strategy include government, pressure groups, and opinion formers. In reality, most marketing communications campaigns use a mixture of both push and pull, although emphasis might be placed on one strategy or the other. Frequently corporate public relations will be employed in parallel to implement a pass strategy to address markets where access is constrained either by non-customers target audiences or non-product related issues. Examples might include a lobbying campaign to amend the regulatory climate or an educational programme to overcome concerns over the introduction of new technology.
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1 Public relations objectives fall into two distinct camps: Awareness/informational objectives are the most common and easiest public relations objectives to achieve, but they can be difficult to measure. Motivational objectives may well be more difficult to achieve but ironically it is argued that they tend to be easier to measure because they are “bottom-line” oriented and are based on clearly measurable results that can be quantified. In short, behaviour is easier to observe than cognitive effects but it is more difficult to prompt.
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1 Begin with “to” followed by a verb describing the direction to the intended outcome. Possibilities include: “to increase,” “to decrease,” and “to maintain.” Specify the outcome to be achieved. Each objective should spell out a single, specific outcome. State the magnitude of change or level to be maintained in measurable terms. The watchwords are quantifiable and realistic. A combination of judgment based on experience and benchmark data is used to set outcome levels. Set the target date for when the outcome is to be achieved. Typically, outcomes must be achieved in order, with one necessary before another.
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1 Programme planning: analysing problems and opportunities, defining goals, recommending and planning activities and measuring results. Liasing with management and clients throughout. Writing and editing: shareholder reports, annual reports, press releases, film scripts, articles and features, speeches, booklets, newsletters. Media relations: developing and maintaining a good working contact with the media. This involves applying a knowledge of how local and national papers, magazines, radio and television work as well as the special interests of journalists. Corporate identity: developing and maintaining an organisation’s identity via corporate advertising, presenting the company’s name and reputation rather than its products. Speaking: communicating effectively with individuals and groups including meetings, presentations and platform participation. Production: brochures, reports, film and multimedia programmes. Co-ordination of studio and location photography. Sound knowledge of techniques for supervision is necessary. Special events: news conferences, exhibitions, facility celebrations, open days, competitions and awards programmes. Research and evaluation: The first activity undertaken by a PR professional. A PR programme should be a continuing process.
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1 Not handshaking and backslapping. Good people skills are a very important part of public relations but today you will not retain an account by expensing three-martini lunches. Public relations is about communicating effectively—it’s not about socialising gracefully. Not journalism. The most common element shared between journalism and public relations is writing. Both professions rely on the written word for much, if not most of their existence. They both use research skills to gather information, and they both must synthesize that information into a suitable format for consumption by an audience. They both face constant and sometimes stressful deadlines. Many from both sectors are involved with mass media. But PR specialists also deal in issues management, events management, advertising, and promotion. PR firms must be able to write in a variety of styles, from 10-second TV teasers to radio taglines, to detailed analytical reports. All of these products are multi-channeled. Most importantly, PR companies must think strategically when encountering daily problems. Journalists are trained to report what they research. PR people are trained to analyse, synthesize and utilise communication channels to transcend mere information dissemination. Where a journalist produces factual and objective copy, a PR specialist culls the facts and presents a viewpoint. Not advertising. Advertisers use the most appropriate mass media to reach their selected audience. PR people also use mass media to reach their publics, but for reasons far different from the ordinary advertiser. PR agencies use more than advertising—they produce brochures, news releases, presentations, feature stories, conference events, posters, web sites, and specialty items. PR moves minds. Advertising moves products. Not marketing. PR is only one of the tools that marketing uses in its promotional planning process. Marketing is also concerned about product design, packaging, pricing, and distribution. PR is concerned with building success through building relationships between an organisation and its publics. McDonalds presents itself to its publics through community support programmes. Politicians bond with constituencies by taking public stances that are out of step with party whips.
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1 Not handshaking and backslapping. Good people skills are a very important part of public relations but today you will not retain an account by expensing three-martini lunches. Public relations is about communicating effectively—it’s not about socialising gracefully. Not journalism. The most common element shared between journalism and public relations is writing. Both professions rely on the written word for much, if not most of their existence. They both use research skills to gather information, and they both must synthesize that information into a suitable format for consumption by an audience. They both face constant and sometimes stressful deadlines. Many from both sectors are involved with mass media. But PR specialists also deal in issues management, events management, advertising, and promotion. PR firms must be able to write in a variety of styles, from 10-second TV teasers to radio taglines, to detailed analytical reports. All of these products are multi-channeled. Most importantly, PR companies must think strategically when encountering daily problems. Journalists are trained to report what they research. PR people are trained to analyse, synthesize and utilise communication channels to transcend mere information dissemination. Where a journalist produces factual and objective copy, a PR specialist culls the facts and presents a viewpoint. Not advertising. Advertisers use the most appropriate mass media to reach their selected audience. PR people also use mass media to reach their publics, but for reasons far different from the ordinary advertiser. PR agencies use more than advertising—they produce brochures, news releases, presentations, feature stories, conference events, posters, web sites, and specialty items. PR moves minds. Advertising moves products. Not marketing. PR is only one of the tools that marketing uses in its promotional planning process. Marketing is also concerned about product design, packaging, pricing, and distribution. PR is concerned with building success through building relationships between an organisation and its publics. McDonalds presents itself to its publics through community support programmes. Politicians bond with constituencies by taking public stances that are out of step with party whips.
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1 Entry-level PR specialists often start out working with words. Then, as they build skills and credibility in strategic organisational planning, they become more involved in planning and executing their organisation’s actions by bringing the public’s point of view into the decision-making process. Many public relations professionals elect to specialise in a certain aspect of public communications, and never enter into another facet of the profession. For example, one may choose to focus on the writing side of the business and remain forever an author of organisational publications, while another may wish to specialise in events management and only seek career moves involving the management of more prominent events. But whether you’re an event planner or a political advisor, practising effective public relations requires a working knowledge of the tools of the trade.
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1 Publicity and media relations. Media relations includes a variety of methods to contact and give information to the media: news releases, press kits, media advisories, news conferences, press tours, and personal letters or phone calls to editors and reporters. Special events. Events draw attention to your organisation or bring people to your place of business. Examples include Open Houses, fund-raisers, trade shows, awards ceremonies, contests, stunts, receptions, speeches by VIPs. Newsletters. Publications extend four to 12 pages in length, with short articles intended to keep customers, clients, members, investors or donors up-to-date on what your organisation and its people are doing. It may also contain advice or other information of particular interest to your audience. Action alerts. One or two page sheets communicating urgent or recent information. The intent is to motivate the reader to take a specific action, such as write a letter to a public official, make a donation, or change a purchasing habit. Tip sheets. One or two-sided sheets containing advice, instructions or other information of particular use to your customers or clients. The objective is to show off your expertise. These sheets are usually formatted as bulleted or numbered lists. Lettre to the Editor and Op Ed Pieces. Promote your expertise by writing a letter to the editor or an Op Ed piece responding to views in the news. Speakers Bureau. Arrange to have individuals in your organisation speak at meetings of professional and trade associations, service clubs, civic organisations and community groups. Sponsorships. Sponsor a sports team, musical group or community theatre. Ensure sponsorship is acknowledged in advertising, programmes, uniforms, posters, balls, paddles, fairings, or other visible spaces. Charitable Contributions. A consistent commitment to giving back to your community by supporting local charities will do much to enhance your image. Charities have to acknowledge the donations publicly, if this gesture is to be considered effective PR. Thank yous. Customers return repeat business to those who appreciate their custom.
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1 Cutlip and Center provide a conceptual framework for understanding the concepts, origins, principles and theories underpinning professional tactics used in the practise of PR by Irish agencies and consultants. They provide extremely pertinent analysis of cost-effective PR campaigns—especially relevant as clients demand more and better public relations counsel for less money. EPR includes history, practises, careers, ethics, and other pertinent components from the field of public relations. If you have never worked on a PR launch or if you have never met a PR account executive, you will definitely benefit from reading this work, as it provides one of the most comprehensive overviews of the global public relations industry. If you believe you will work in the PR industry or work alongside PR professionals, you will not be able to survive without understanding the core concepts addressed in this book and in this module.
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1 The Cluetrain Manifesto by Christopher Locke, Rick Levine, Doc Searls, and David Weinberger [ISBN 0738204315 ] is available in hardcover, audio cassette and audio CD. No Logo by Naomi Klein ISBN 0312421435 available in hardcover from Picador, e-book (Adobe Reader and Microsoft Reader). Smart Mobs: The Next Social Revolution by Howard Rheingold [ISBN 0738208612 ] is available in hardcover.
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1 Name______________________________ Mobile Phone number ________________ Email _____________________________ URL ____________________________
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1
  • online at http://ict.tippinst.ie/~bgoldbach/pr/lectures/ 8/19/2008 Open Media Studies PR Lecture 1

A Short Intro to Public Relations A Short Intro to Public Relations Presentation Transcript

  • 1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Introduction PR Lecture 1 Bernard @topgold Goldbach Online: http://moodle.lit.ie/course/view.php?id=1496 Notes: http://evernote.com/pub/topgold/pr A Web Promotion for Business Module 1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Topics
    • Aims of Course
    • Learning Outcomes
    • Term Outline
    • Time (Hours per week)
    • Assessment Breakdown
    • Course Content
    • Other Matters
    • Textbooks
    • Intro Lecture with Revision
    • Practical Task
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Aims of Course
    • To provide you with instruction in the theory of public relations.
    • To engage in the practise of public relations.
    • To develop new media skills in the realm of PR.
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Learning Outcomes
    • To acquire skills and training needed to engage in a series of PR activities.
    • To know the tasks, skills and resources needed to mount a professional PR campaign.
    • To appreciate various ethical codes governing the conduct of Irish PR professionals.
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Term Outline
    • 10 lectures (10 Jan- 1 May) and includes G+ cross-talk.
    • Google Hangout with @ictedu.
    • Google Hangout with @mitchjoel.
    • 1 Revision session.
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Scheduling
    • Mon download FIR and SPOS
    • Tue lecture 0900-1100
    • Wed practical 1400-1600
    • Fri Moodle Feedback
    • Activity normally assessed fortnightly.
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Assessments
    • 30% PR Campaign
    • 30% Collaborative Documentation
    • 20% Profile
    • 20% Press Releases
    • In-class Rich Media CV
    • In-class Crisis Communications Checklist
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Assessment Values
    • 30% End of Year Examination
    • 70% Continuous Assessment
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Content of Course
    • Audiences
    • Best Practise
    • PR Communication and Media
    • PR Research
    • PR Campaign
    • Ethics and Professional Issues
    • Readings
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • What is PR?
    • Public relations is about reputation.
    • PR aims to earn understanding and support by influencing opinion and behaviour.
    • PR is the planned and sustained effort to establish and maintain goodwill between an organisation and its publics.
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Forms of PR
    • Public information
    • Investor relations
    • Public affairs
    • Corporate communications
    • Marketing
    • Customer relations
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Functions of PR
    • Awareness
    • Education
    • Credibility
    • Third party endorsement
    • Permission to buy
    • Differentiation
    • Positioning
    • Relationship marketing
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Effective reach
    • Public relations can reach difficult targets in a way that paid media cannot.
    • The main costs of public relations are consultancy fees or in-house salaries.
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • PR Strategies
    • Push strategy
    • Pull strategy
    • Pass strategy
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Objectives of public relations
    • Awareness
    • Motivational
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Measuring PR effectiveness
    • If an objective is to be measured effectively, it needs to be defined clearly.
    • When writing PR objectives, you should discuss
      • The nature of the intended change
      • The target public
      • The outcome to be achieved
      • The amount of change desired
      • A target date for achieving the outcome.
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • PR at its best
    • At its best, PR tells an organisation’s story to its publics,
    • PR helps to shape the organisation and the way it works,
    • Research, feedback communication and evaluation finds out the concerns and expectations of a company’s publics
    • PR explains the company’s publics to management.
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • PR activities
    • Programme planning
    • Writing and editing
    • Media relations
    • Corporate identity
    • Speaking
    • Production
    • Special events
    • Research and evaluation
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • What PR is not
    • Public relations is not handshaking.
    • Public relations is not journalism.
    • Public relations is not advertising.
    • Public relations is not marketing.
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • PR distinctions
    • Effective communicators often possess graceful protocol.
    • PR agencies monitor news to place content in it.
    • Culled research helps place copy.
    • PR moves minds. Advertising moves products.
    • Public relations means nurturing relationships.
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Important PR skillsets
    • Analyse mgt needs
    • Counsel mgt
    • Identify causes of problems
    • Trend analysis
    • Plan, organise and co-ordinate tasks
    • Monitor and follow up
    • Set goals and objectives
    • Motivate and influence others
    • Work effectively with journos
    • Communicate clearly during meetings
    • Write press releases
    • Identify major social issues
    • Work with others
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Major PR requirements
    • Common sense
    • Energy
    • Curiosity
    • Open-mindedness
    • Flexibility
    • Creativity
    • Stamina
    • Organisation skills
    • Literacy
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Show me the money
    • PR officer €23,600
    • PR manager €38,100
    • Head of communications €60,000
    • Account executive €22,000
    • Account manager €30,000
    • Account director €40,000
    • Board director €65,000
    • Managing director €80,000
    • Freelance €48,900
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Ten effective PR tactics
    • Publicity and media relations
    • Special events
    • Newsletters
    • Action alerts
    • Tip sheets
    • Op Ed pieces
    • Speakers Bureau
    • Sponsorships
    • Charitable Contributions
    • Thank you notes
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • 1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Effective Public Relations
    • “ EPR” is the 20 th Century view of PR.
    • Serves as an authoritative reference.
    • Pink highlights are past final examination refrences.
    • By Scott Cutlip, Allen Center, and Glen Broom, Prentice Hall, 8 th ed. (1999)
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Supplemental Texts
    • Measure What Matters by Katie Paine.
    • Six Pixels of Separation by Mitch Joel.
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Useful Sources
    • For Immediate Release Podcast by Neville Hobson and Shel Holtz http://www.forimmediaterelease.biz
    • Six Pixels of Separation Podcast by Mitch Joel, http://www.twistimage.com/blog
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Revision
    • List three PR activities.
    • List six skills considered to be important in the field of public relations.
    • Briefly describe an effective PR tactic.
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Activity PR01
    • Register yourself onto the Moodle PR course.
    • Upload an image of yourself into the Moodle course ( 100x100 pixels ).
    • Complete personal information in the Moodle profile area.
    • Register yourself on Google Plus with five images and bragging rights.
    • Register yourself on Flickr and add at least five contacts.
    • Register yourself on Friendfeed and join FIR room.
    • Register on delicious.com and add topgold to your network.
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • Questions? 1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    • Bernie Goldbach [email_address] edits www.insideview.ie and monitors twitter.com/topgold
    • Use social media channels for best effect.
    • +353 861743369
  • #LITpr
    • This PR module is presented in the Limerick Institute of Technology .
    • It features in the Web Promotion for Business Special Purpose Award.
    1/11/2012 Web Promotion for Business PR12 v1 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0