Our trip to
Auschwitz
The Holocaust Educational Trust
Through the Lessons from Auschwitz Project, sixth-form
students and their teachers take pa...
The Seminar
• We went to Cardiff to take part in a seminar before our trip to Auschwitz.
• We listened to a Holocaust surv...
The story of Eva’s mother
Anna came from a village near Prague and studied law at university before marrying
architect Ber...
Anna, who was not fed or watered for three weeks, was nine-months pregnant and weighing just five stone.
She gave birth to...
Our trip to Poland
Before going to the camps, we visited a small
town called Oświęcim which once was home
to many Jews. In...
There was a room full hair that the Nazis had removed
from the inmates and used to sell to companies that
created carpets ...
• At the time of our visit it was 6 degrees, and we were freezing. This shows how the victims who had no coats, shoes
and ...
We also visited Auschwitz Birkenau
which was the extra barracks built
purposely to house the extra victims.
This is where ...
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Auschwitz presentation 2014

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Auschwitz presentation 2014

  1. 1. Our trip to Auschwitz
  2. 2. The Holocaust Educational Trust Through the Lessons from Auschwitz Project, sixth-form students and their teachers take part in two afternoon seminars and a one-day visit to the former Nazi extermination camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau in order to then pass on the lessons in their schools and communities
  3. 3. The Seminar • We went to Cardiff to take part in a seminar before our trip to Auschwitz. • We listened to a Holocaust survivor talk, to prepare us for what we would see when we got to Poland. • Eva Clark talked to us about her mother’s experience in concentration camps, and how she survived being born in Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria. • We were shown images of German people at this time, and concentration camps. • We were encouraged to think about the three groups of people, the perpetrators, the bystanders and the victims and who could be blamed. • We were also put into the groups we would be in for the trip to Poland. We discussed our opinions on how the holocaust should be remembered, who was to blame and whether Auschwitz should be maintained for visitors to see.
  4. 4. The story of Eva’s mother Anna came from a village near Prague and studied law at university before marrying architect Bernd Nathan in May 1940 – a year after Hitler invaded Czechoslovakia and began imposing limitations on Jews. In December 1941, Anna was sent to Terezin, a ghetto 35 miles from Prague, where she was separated from her husband for three years. During that time, she fell pregnant and was forced to sign a document stating that when her baby was born, it would be killed by the Gestapo. But that didn’t happen – her son Dan died of pneumonia at the age of two months. Then in September 1944 all of Anna’s relations including her husband were sent to Auschwitz and, in the early stages of pregnancy again, she followed him. But the Nazis deemed Anna fit enough to work and she was sent to a munitions factory in Freiberg, near Dresden, before then being forced onto an open coal train that took her to the Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria. Eva told us how a Nazi guard allowed a farmer to give her mother a glass of milk, something she believes allowed her to survive.
  5. 5. Anna, who was not fed or watered for three weeks, was nine-months pregnant and weighing just five stone. She gave birth to Eva, who weighed just 3lb, surrounded by 20 women dying of typhoid with lice crawling around in their thousands before wrapping the tiny baby in newspaper to try and keep her warm. Eva says two things kept her mother and her alive: the Americans’ liberation of the camp just three days later and the fact she was born the day after the Germans blew up the camp’s gas chamber in a bid to conceal evidence from the advancing allies. Eva was born healthily, with no medical problems despite the terrible conditions and weighing just 3lbs. A doctor was allowed to come to Eva’s mother to cut the umbilical cord and ensure her health. Anna later returned with Eva to Prague to find out what had happened to their family. Her husband Bernd had been shot a week before the liberation of Auschwitz and her father died of pneumonia. The rest of the family had been executed in the gas chambers. It was after the war that Anna took Eva to live with one of her cousins until February 1948, when she married Karel Bergman. He adopted Eva and seven months later the family met up in Cardiff. The story of Eva’s mother
  6. 6. Our trip to Poland Before going to the camps, we visited a small town called Oświęcim which once was home to many Jews. In the town there was a synagogue and a church standing side by side, and our guide explained how everyone of different religions had lived in harmony before the war. Now there are no Jews living in that town. We visited the site of an old synagogue that the Nazis had burned down during WW2. We then visited another synagogue in the town and listened to Rabbi Marcus talk about how Jewish culture influences everyone's life. We found out that Jews of the town had hidden valuables such as the Qu’ran scroll under the synagogue which were not discovered till many years later.
  7. 7. There was a room full hair that the Nazis had removed from the inmates and used to sell to companies that created carpets out of it. The room contained hair from 140,000 victims, yet this amount was collected in just a week. Auschwitz 1 We visited Auschwitz 1 first. This is the camp that is set up as a typical museum, and has different rooms with different exhibitions. There was also a room containing shoes that were taken from Jews. This shows the vast amount of people that were killed.
  8. 8. • At the time of our visit it was 6 degrees, and we were freezing. This shows how the victims who had no coats, shoes and warmth suffered during the winter months. • In the brick housing for the campmates there was no insulation or heating. There were also thin windows that offered no protection in the winter. • The stone steps in these buildings are worn into two groves, showing how so many people had trodden on them and the vast amount of victims. • The ground was covered in stony gravel. The victims did not often have shoes so this caused pain and disease. • There were also torture rooms in this camp. These were kept for the prisoners who were deemed as needing extra punishment. These included starvation room, a dark room with no light and a room only big enough to stand. • They also killed people by firing squad, but this was replaced by gas to save bullets and to not mentally harm the Nazi officers. Auschwitz 1- living conditions
  9. 9. We also visited Auschwitz Birkenau which was the extra barracks built purposely to house the extra victims. This is where the large gas chambers were situated, the ones that the Nazis destroyed before the liberation. The vast size of this camp is shocking and goes on as long as you can see. There are also foundations laid which shows the plans the Nazis had to further expand this death camp. Auschwitz Birkenau The barracks had gaps at the bottom and along the top of the roof which made them freezing in the winter. They had huge bunk beds inside, which were crammed. They were full of diseases, and people fought to get to the top bunk. This was because the diarrhoea used to fall on those on the bottom bunks. At Auschwitz Birkenau we were showed a cattle cart which transported the victims to the camp. These held 80 people for days on end.

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