www.AHaganAssociatesLtd.com - Household Energy Efficiency and Carbon Minimisation

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www.AHaganAssociatesLtd.com, Household Energy Efficiency and Carbon Minimisation, CERT,CESP,SHESP,RHI

www.AHaganAssociatesLtd.com, Household Energy Efficiency and Carbon Minimisation, CERT,CESP,SHESP,RHI

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  • 1. Household Energy Efficiency and Carbon Reduction Development of a Local Area Project Plan and Delivery Programme
  • 2. Issues Considered •Background Information, Havering Base Data, 1 Policies and Strategies • Developing the Local Area Project Plan and Delivery 2 Programme Key Actions • A Local Area Plan based on appropriate Eligible 3 Client Criteria • Current Funding Streams, Delivery and Reporting 4 Mechanisms • Overcoming the Key Challenges 5 • Appendices 6
  • 3. • Background Information • Havering Base Data 1 • Policies • Strategies • Plans and Programmes
  • 4. Carbon Dioxide Emissions (London) Causation Factors (excluding Aviation)
  • 5. Carbon Emission Reduction UK and London Targets
  • 6. Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Household Energy Management
  • 7. Community Energy Saving Programme (CESP) • CESP will promote a whole house, property-by-property, street-by-street and multiple measure approach. • CESP will be delivered through the development of community-based partnerships involving Suppliers and Generators, Local Authorities and Registered Social Landlords. • It is estimated that around 100 schemes will be funded throughout the UK, benefiting around 90,000 homes across Great Britain. • The programme is targeted at reducing Carbon Emissions and alleviating Fuel Poverty. • The programme will be focused on areas of low income and high deprivation.
  • 8. DECC: Community Energy Saving Programme (CESP)
  • 9. DECC: Low Carbon Community Challenge (LCCC)
  • 10. Homes and Communities Agency (HCA) Some Government Policy
  • 11. Havering: Wards and Housing Tenure
  • 12. Havering: Housing Tenure and SAP Ratings Tenure Dwellings Average SAP Average CO2 Average cost emissions (£/yr.) (tonnes/yr.) Owner- Occupier 76,428 47 9 768 Local Authority 11,603 61 6 516 Private Rented 5,065 41 11 815 Housing Assoc. 2,026 61 6 516 OVERALL 95,122 49 9 734 Notes: 1. Based on latest data gathering survey for the Borough 2. The average SAP rating for Havering properties in the private sector is 47. The Housing Corporation recommendation is 71-85 for New Build and 56-70 for Improvement Works 3. National Energy Action recommends a SAP value of 70 across the whole Housing Stock
  • 13. Havering: Indices of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) 2007 and Fuel Poverty Statistics
  • 14. Policies and Consultations The following Havering documents, other documents and policies considered: • English Housing Condition Survey • Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) Ratings • National Energy Agency Fuel Poverty Data • Other Local Authority Fuel Poverty Strategies • The Mayor’s Fuel Poverty Strategy • UK Fuel Poverty Strategy • Havering’s Fuel Poverty Indicator and Strategy • Home Energy Conservation Act data (collected by DEFRA) • DECC: CERT, CESP, PAYS (HESS)
  • 15. Havering: Current Energy Efficiency Schemes Scheme Warm Front Rethink Energy Keep Warm Keep Well Here to Help
  • 16. Potential Linkages to Other Policies and Strategies Strategy Name Community Strategy Corporate Housing Strategy Private Sector Housing Strategy Home Energy Conservation Act 1995 (HECA) Decent Homes Standard Unitary Development Plan (UDP) Building Control Legislation Climate Change Strategy Government Fuel Poverty Strategy
  • 17. RE:NEW - Home Energy Efficiency for Tomorrow
  • 18. London: Homes Energy Efficiency Programme (HEEP)
  • 19. • Developing the Local Area 2 Project Plan and Programme – Key Actions
  • 20. Developing the Local Area Project Plan and Programme Key Actions (See separate sheets) • Confirm Managing Agent Service Brief and Contract with Lead Officer • Assemble Background Information, Base Data, Policies, Strategies, Plans and Programmes • Define Relevant/Applicable Funding Stream(s) • Explore Linkages to Other Funding Streams, Projects and Programmes • Confirm Relevant Eligibility Criteria to be applied and “The Offer” • Define Local Area(s) which are to be Targeted for Improvement Measures • Target Relevant Eligible Client Group(s): Develop / Implement Marketing Exercise Plan • Consultations with Key Stakeholders • Practical Improvement Measures, Costs and Procurement / Delivery Methods • Implement Practical Measures to Agreeable Targeted Client Group(s) • Monitor Brief, Service Level Agreement, Performance Agreement and Indicators • Incorporate Improvements from Experience on next Phase
  • 21. Outline Delivery Programme Assumptions (SHESP) 1. Budget = £1.5 million 2. Number of Low-Income Households fulfilling Eligibility Criteria = 500 (SHESP =2100 properties at Cat2 and Cat3 levels, for Havering) 3. Therefore, approximate cost of appropriate Practical Measures = £3,000 per household 4. 8 month period is purely for implementing the Practical Measures – that is, all other Key Actions have been, or will be, undertaken outside this time period
  • 22. Outline Delivery Programme (SHESP?) (See separate sheet for detail) Pre- Implement Practical Post- Key Action Measures Phase Contract Contract Month No. Phase Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Confirm Managing Agent Service Brief and Contract with Lead Officer Assemble Background Information, Base Data, Policies, Strategies, Plans and Programmes Define Relevant/Applicable Funding Stream(s) Explore Linkages to Other Funding Streams, Projects and Programmes Confirm Relevant Eligibility Criteria to be applied and “The Offer” Define Local Area(s) which are to be Targeted for Improvement Measures Target Relevant Eligible Client Group(s) Consultations with Key Stakeholders Determine Practical Improvement Measures, Costs and Procurement / Delivery Methods Implement Practical Measures to Agreeable Targeted Client Group(s) Monitor Brief, Service Level Agreement, Performance Agreement and Indicators Incorporate Improvements from Experience on next Phase
  • 23. • A Local Area Project Plan 3 based on appropriate Eligible Client Criteria
  • 24. Typical “Offer” made to Eligible Client Groups
  • 25. Local Area (Ward Based) for Targeted Eligible Client Groups
  • 26. Local Area (District Based) for Targeted Eligible Client Groups
  • 27. Indicative Costs of Energy Efficiency Measures
  • 28. • Current Funding , Delivery 4 and Reporting Mechanisms
  • 29. Funding, Delivery and Reporting Mechanisms (See separate sheets) • Funding Streams and Government Departments • Current Delivery Agencies • Eligibility Criteria • Current Reporting Mechanisms
  • 30. Funding Stream and Government Departments Funding Stream Funding Government Department Warm Front DECC £959 million Carbon Emissions Reduction Target (CERT) DECC £3.36 billion Community Energy Saving Programme (CESP) DECC £350 million Boiler Scrappage Scheme DECC £400 vouchers Decent Homes CLG £2 billion £40 billion by 2010 Winter Fuel Payments DWP £8.1 billion £125-400p/p Cold Weather Payments DWP £209 million
  • 31. Key Current London Retrofitting Schemes
  • 32. Key Current Retrofitting Schemes outside London
  • 33. Current Delivery Agencies Local Authorities - Energy Conservation, Housing and Fuel Poverty Strategies Eaga plc – Managing Agent for the Government’s Warm Front Scheme Energy Savings Trust – Customer advice on carbon reductions Warm Zones – Managing agent for area based fuel poverty schemes Utility Company Management Teams – Delivery of CERT programmes Private Sector Managing Agents Carbon Trust Registered Social Landlords - Decent Homes Programmes
  • 34. Eligibility Criteria Vulnerable Groups Prioritised for Affordable Warmth Work Priority will be given to vulnerable groups that have been previously listed as suffering disproportionately from fuel poverty, on the following basis: • Disabled residents in receipt of a means-tested benefit • Older residents (aged 60 and over) in receipt of a means-tested benefit • Older residents (aged 60 and over) who are not in receipt of benefits but who have a low income • Residents under 60 who have young children (aged 16 and under) and are in receipt of certain means-tested benefits • Low income families who are not in receipt of benefits • Residents with caring responsibilities for people in vulnerable groups, including those suffering from disabilities or long term illnesses. • Residents will be prioritised for council (Rethink Energy) grant aid if they are ineligible for Warm Front grants for central heating or insulation measures and meet the criteria set out above. Council tenants who due to financial difficulties fall into rent arrears will be prioritise for energy efficiency measures in order to help lower their household fuel bills.
  • 35. Current Reporting Mechanisms • Local Authorities • Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) • Office of the Gas and Energy Markets (OFGEM) • Energy Utility Companies • Energy Saving Trust (EST) • Fuel Poverty Advisory Group (FPAG) • National Energy Action (NEA) – National fuel poverty charity
  • 36. • Overcoming the Key 4 Challenges
  • 37. Energy Conservation Funding and Reporting Mechanisms Key: Funding Route Reporting Route DECC Managing Energy Agents: Contractors Warm Front / Utilities / Warm Front and Service Eaga Plc CERT / CERT Agents Eligible Customer Local Energy Saving Authorities Trust
  • 38. The Key Challenges • Multiple Private Sector Agencies • Wide variety of Funding Mechanisms • Mechanisms in direct competition with each other • Wide range of agencies, funding and eligibility lead to lack of consumer confidence • Specific Targeting Data from DWP and LA Revenue & Benefits not available • Management Agent Fees and Referral Fees • Propose Integrated Local Area Based Delivery Programme to deliver local energy conservation and carbon reduction
  • 39. Overcoming the Challenges 1. CERT, CESP and Warm Front, be coordinated via a Single Community Energy Fund (SCEF) with DECC as Key Stakeholder to centrally coordinate fund 2. An Integrated Local Area Based Delivery Mechanism to be established – led by Local Authorities • Standardise Monitoring of Performance on National Indicator 187 (Fuel Poverty) through the nationally recognised Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) – on the 0 to 100 energy efficiency calibration for domestic properties to provide accurate national baseline to measure progress • Stock Condition Energy Databases in all LA areas (recommended by Audit Commission) • Use LA Procurement mechanisms for local home efficiency work (Public Accounts Committee) • DWP and LA Benefits data - consider access arrangements to target vulnerable/eligible client groups
  • 40. Householders need an Integrated Funding and Delivery System
  • 41. Delivery Chart for an Integrated Funding and Delivery System Funding Funding From Energy Utility From DECC Companies New Community Energy Agency (CEA) Agency distributes funding directly to Local Area Based Schemes: Progress reported to DECC Local Area Based Schemes Local Delivery Mechanism led by Local Authorities. Partners include Energy Saving Trust and Community Groups. Local Progress reported to CEA Eligible Customer Delivery Homeowners receive a single, consistent and clear message to maximise engagement and maximise energy conservation measures installed
  • 42. End of Presentation Thank You Appendices Follow
  • 43. • Appendix 1 • Appendix 2 • Appendix 3 6 • Appendix 4 • Appendix 5 • Appendix 6 • Appendix 7
  • 44. •Decent Homes •Indices of Multiple Deprivation Appendix 1 •Neighbourhood Statistics •Housing Tenure
  • 45. Definition of Decent Homes Decent Homes – “should be warm, weather proof and have reasonably modern facilities, free from category 1 hazards under HHSRS, in a reasonable state of repair, reasonably modern, and reach a reasonable degree of thermal comfort.” Local authorities may use a Private Finance Initiative to either do the work themselves, or sub-contract it to an ALMO; or, transfer housing stock to an RSL to do the works. 95% of social rented stock is required to achieve Decent Homes Standards by 2010.
  • 46. Havering Indices of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) 2007 and Fuel Poverty Statistics Havering is not deemed to be an area of deprivation as classified by the IMD 2007 (Indices of Multiple Deprivation), as it falls outside the top 50 most deprived areas in the country. Havering ranks 200th most deprived local authority (out of 354) in England according to the Indices of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) • This is based on the new super output areas and is not calculated on the old ward based indices as used in 2000, which are no longer used. However, it is recognised that Havering does have pockets of deprivation within the borough. Extent of fuel poverty in Havering • The information provided by the Centre for Sustainable Energy's, Fuel Poverty Indicator for Havering (which is based on information gathered for the 1996 English House Condition Survey) indicates that some 17% of residents are potentially in fuel poverty.
  • 47. Indices of Deprivation 2007 This EXCEL workbook contains indicators that were included in the English Indices of Deprivation 2007 (please go to the following link for a copy of the full report http://www.communities.gov.uk/documents/communities/pdf/733520.pdf) • Most indicators relate to 2005 but for precise details about each of the indicators and their data time points please see Appendix B of the English Indices 2007 report (pages 92-97), and see Appendix C for a list of the data sources (pages 98-100). The indicators are released at Lower layer Super Output Area (LSOA) level.
  • 48. Income Deprivation Domain ID 2007 Income Deprivation Domain Name of indicator: Income Indicator ID 2007 – This is the numerator for the Income Domain, i.e. • • adults and children in Income Support households, plus • • adults and children in Income Based Job Seekers Allowance households, plus • • adults and children in Pension Credit (Guarantee) households, plus • • adults and children in Working Families Tax Credit households where there are children in receipt of Child Tax Credit whose equivalised income (excluding housing benefits) is below 60% of median before housing costs, plus • • adults and children in Child Tax Credit households (who are not eligible for IS, Income-Based JSA, Pension Credit or Working Tax Credit) whose equivalised income (excluding housing benefits) is below 60% of median before housing costs, plus • • adults and children in households in receipt of National Asylum Support Service (NASS) vouchers • Numbers less than 10 are suppressed. All other numbers are rounded to the nearest 5.
  • 49. Havering: ONS Neighbourhood Statistics
  • 50. Havering: Housing Tenure
  • 51. Havering: Housing Tenure There were 95,559 residential properties in Havering in April 2002. 11,724 (12%) of these were Council owned and 2,026 (2%) owned by Housing Associations. Nearly 3% of the Borough’s private sector housing was thought to be vacant at the same date The private sector is, therefore, very much the dominant sector in Havering.
  • 52. •Policies •Strategies Appendix 2 •Funding Stream Detail •Schemes
  • 53. Potential Linkages to Other Policies and Strategies Strategy Name Objective Link Community Strategy Improving the quality of life in Havering - economic, The provision of energy efficiency grants and advice social and environmental. that will improve health and housing, encourage partnership and reduce energy use. Corporate Housing Strategy Improving energy efficiency and tackling fuel poverty. Promoting quality across tenures. Promoting community well being. Directly tackling fuel poverty. Private Sector Housing Strategy Continued focus on improving energy efficiency This strategy will enable conscious targeting of fuel poverty and improvements in energy efficiency Home Energy Conservation Act 1995 To report on the strategies that deal with fuel poverty. The development and delivery of this strategy is in accordance with the requirements of the HECA. (HECA) Decent Homes Standard To provide a reasonable degree of thermal comfort. Assists objectives through provision of energy Requires dwellings to have both effective insulation efficiency measures e.g. loft insulation wall insulation and efficient heating. and efficient heating systems. Unitary Development Plan (UDP) Soon to be reviewed and updated. Will contain much Through efficient consumption of energy via provision broader overarching environmental sustainability of energy efficiency measures. criteria Building Control Legislation Building Regulations, Revision Part L1, Thermal Delivers objective through provision of energy Efficiency, requires improved insulation and upgraded efficiency measures as specified in the regulations. heating controls. Climate Change Strategy Reduction of pollution and energy use to lessen effects Energy use in homes accounts for 29% of total energy of global warming. used in the UK. Improved home energy efficiency will be a major part of the Climate Change Strategy. Government Fuel Poverty Strategy Tackling low income and unemployment, Assists objective through improved energy efficiency of Reducing fuel bills, homes, with subsequent reduction in fuel bills. Improving energy efficiency of homes.
  • 54. Havering: Housing Strategy 2009/10 – 2011/12
  • 55. Havering: Fuel Poverty/Affordable Warmth Strategy Why we need a Strategy • An opportunity to re-assess how we target the provision of assistance for residents in need. •An opportunity to encourage service providers to co-operate The reasons for formulating a strategy are: • To strengthen Havering’s present system of fuel poverty alleviation and affordable warmth provision • To comply with the Home Energy Conservation Act 1995 • To encourage greater council-wide involvement • To increase partnership working and funding to enable a more ambitious approach towards this high priority problem • The Government has set a target for fuel poverty to be eradicated for vulnerable households by 2010 and for all others by 2016. • The London Mayor requests the assistance of London Boroughs to ensure that there are no occupied dwellings in London with a Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) rating of less then 30 by 2010, and less then 40 by 2016. • To ensure that Havering plays its part in meeting national Climate Change targets for cutting carbon dioxide emissions
  • 56. Typical Community Warmth Programme
  • 57. Current Funding Mechanisms • Warm Front Scheme • Carbon Emissions Reduction Target (CERT) • Community Energy Saving Programme (CESP) • Boiler Scrappage Scheme • Decent Homes • Low Carbon Buildings Programme LCBP (Phase 2) • Local Authority Budgets • NHS Budgets • European Regional Development Fund (ERDF)
  • 58. Where is the funding coming from? • London has a range of existing programmes such as Warm Zones, the Community Energy Saving Programme (CESP), the Social Housing Energy Saving Programme (SHESP), Low Carbon Zones and Decentralised Energy programmes. • The LDA is providing funding of £9.5m for 2009 – 2012. • The aim is to use the £9.5m to develop a delivery model, provide top-up funding and support to ensure a holistic approach to delivery, and unify projects under a London-wide programme, levering additional existing funding where possible. • Case to government that post 2012 a mechanism will be in place for this programme to make a direct regional bid for large pots of money by providing a clear robust delivery mechanism. • The RE:NEW project partners intend to develop and launch in 2010 a viable plan to deliver a London-wide programme up to 2015. (See Appendix for fuller details)
  • 59. Funding Streams and Eligible Client Groups Funding Warm Front Carbon Community Boiler Decent Homes Winter Fuel Cold Weather Stream £959 million Emissions Energy Saving Scrappage £2 billion Payments Payments Reduction Programme Scheme £40 billion by £8.1 billion £209 million Target (CERT) (CESP) £400 vouchers 2010 £125-400p/p £3.36 billion £350 million Eligible Client  Private Sector All private sector Community Groups Households with G- ALMOs or RSLs 60+ In receipt of pension Households domestic homes and Housing Associations rated or worse boilers Partners can also credit or Emp&Supp, Group and Private social properties Local Authority Open to all 125,000 qualify if they receive: All JSA, Income Rented households living in Pension Credit Support, Prem for Properties owned, or privately Income Support disabled only rented JSA or EMP&Supp  Households Allowance must have qualifying benefits or disability premium  Households with child under 16  Homeowners aged over 60 who do not qualify for the full Warm Front Grant will qualify for a £300 discount off the cost of a new gas boiler
  • 60. Funding Streams and Eligibility Criteria Funding Warm Front Carbon Community Boiler Decent Homes Winter Fuel Cold Weather Stream £959 million Emissions Energy Saving Scrappage £2 billion Payments Payments Reduction Programme Scheme £40 billion by £8.1 billion £209 million Target (CERT) (CESP) £400 vouchers 2010 £125-400p/p £3.36 billion £350 million Eligibility  Income Support All domestic homes – Applications received Households under 60 Weather to be 0  CT Benefit energy suppliers can from areas ranked in can apply – but only if degrees for 7 consec Criteria  Housing Benefit fund measures in any the lowest 10% in the boiler being days 1/11 to 31/11  JSA household and must England or 15% in scrapped is in  Pension Credit direct at least 40% of Wales and Scotland working order & is the  Income Related carbon savings to a via the IMD 2007 main boiler used to Emp&Sup priority group of low heat the home Allowance income and elderly Households over 60  Working Tax customers can apply regardless Credit if the boiler is in  Disability Living working order or not Allowance Only Households and  Child Tax Credit Landlords who  HB privately own  Inc Support dwellings can apply  War Disability People who own, or Pension rent from a private  Industrial Injuries Landlord, in receipt of Benefit certain benefits can  Attendance apply Allowance If you apply for Boiler If qualify for Warm Front Scrappage you you cannot apply for cannot apply for Boiler Scrappage Scheme Warm Front funding
  • 61. Funding Streams, Government Department and Delivery Agency Funding Warm Front Carbon Community Boiler Decent Homes Winter Fuel Cold Weather Stream £959 million Emissions Energy Saving Scrappage £2 billion Payments Payments Reduction Programme Scheme £40 billion by £8.1 billion £209 million Target (CERT) (CESP) £400 vouchers 2010 £125-400p/p £3.36 billion £350 million Government DECC DECC DECC DECC CLG DWP DWP Department Delivery Eaga Plc 6 largest Energy Energy Supply Energy Saving Trust Homes and Pension Service Pension Service Utilities: Companies Communities Agency Job Centre Plus Agency  British Gas  EDF Energy  Npower  S&SE  Scottish Power All run their own energy conservation programmes providing funding for energy efficiency measures directly to householders In addition, LAs and Housing Assocns. can work in partnership with energy suppliers in their local areas
  • 62. Funding Streams and Practical Measures Funds can be used for Funding Warm Front Carbon Community Boiler Decent Homes Winter Fuel Cold Weather Stream £959 million Emissions Energy Saving Scrappage £2 billion Payments Payments Reduction Programme Scheme £40 billion by £8.1 billion £209 million Target (CERT) (CESP) £400 vouchers 2010 £125-400p/p £3.36 billion £350 million Practical  Loft Insulation  Energy Insulation £400 towards cost of Energy Efficient No restrictions No restrictions  Draught efficiency Fuel switch to gas boiler Boilers Measures Proofing measures Connection to district Cavity Wall and Loft funds can be  Cavity Wall  Heat heating scheme Insulation Insulation Recovery Ground source heat used for  Hot Water Ventilation pumps Tank Units; radiator Micro-generation Insulation panels Heating controls  Repairs to  Heating Boiler replacement Existing Systems incl. Installation of central Heating Controls heating to homes Systems  Renewable / currently without  New Gas, sustainable Home energy audits Electric or Oil energy Central measures Heating  Renewable Energy Measures where off the Gas Network
  • 63. Havering: Current Energy Efficiency Schemes Scheme Outline (See Appendix 1 for further details) Warm Front A national, benefit-related grant, that provides insulation and improved heating to eligible people in private sector housing. Rethink Energy A council run scheme that provides energy advice via our local Energy Efficiency Advice Centre, and provides guidance on the range of grants and energy efficiency improvements discounts available in Havering. Direct referrals are made to the various funding agencies Keep Warm A joint council and Havering PCT run scheme that targets those households that use Keep Well the services provided by health and social care professionals. Training is given to health professionals visiting potentially vulnerable households to enable them to identify the signs of fuel poverty and enable them to refer to an appropriate energy efficiency grant. The scheme is directly linked to Rethink Energy in order to provide advice, information and a direct path of available grants Here to Help A partnership between British Gas and the council to provide insulation measures to council owned dwellings. This scheme also provides a benefits check for tenants in order to improve income levels. Referrals can also be made to charity partners (RNIB, Help the Aged, Ginger Bread) as appropriate. Also a distribution channel for energy efficient light bulbs to tenants.
  • 64. Havering: Corporate Planned Expenditure 2010/11 – 2012/13
  • 65. •Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Appendix 3 •Homes and Communities Agency (HCA)
  • 66. DECC: Ambition for Households
  • 67. DECC: Key Changes to CESP
  • 68. DECC: HESS and CESP
  • 69. DECC: CESP
  • 70. DECC: Comprehensive Area Assessments (CAA) and Reward
  • 71. Homes and Communities Agency (HCA) Moving from Area-Based Partnerships to a Total Place Approach
  • 72. Homes and Communities Agency (HCA)
  • 73. • RE:NEW - Home Energy Appendix 4 Efficiency for Tomorrow
  • 74. RE:NEW - Home Energy Efficiency for Tomorrow
  • 75. RE:NEW - Home Energy Efficiency for Tomorrow • RE:NEW (formerly the Homes Energy Efficiency Programme (HEEP)) is a pan-London homes retrofitting scheme aimed at reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the residential sector. Through initial trials and demonstration projects practical energy efficiency activities will be delivered and these will inform the design of a model that will enable roll-out into a wider homes retrofit programme for London. • The model is an area based, whole house approach that encompasses all housing tenures and has something to offer every borough and every household. It includes a range of free-of-charge, easy-to-do measures, from changing to low energy light bulbs to installing stand-by switches and giving energy saving advice. The aim is that more substantial steps such as loft and cavity wall insulation will involve no upfront costs, be free for those on qualifying benefits and subsidised for those who are able to pay. Offering the package of easy measures enables the delivery of something into every home visited, therefore increasing the uptake of measures overall. • The programme is operated by London’s Boroughs. The boroughs are supportive of the process, methodology and ambition of the scheme. There is also widespread support for the model, which ensures that all boroughs will get funding to roll out the scheme in their areas in 2010.
  • 76. RE:NEW - Home Energy Efficiency for Tomorrow • This programme aims to cover all areas of London, visiting between 200,000 to 500,000 properties by 2012 and 1.2 million domestic properties by 2015 subject to the leverage of additional finances from government. By installing the easy measures, over 400,000 tonnes of carbon emissions could be saved by 2015. By installing further measures, such as loft or cavity wall insulation, reductions of over 1,344,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide could be made by 2015. • RE:NEW will also help alleviate fuel poverty through improving the energy efficiency of homes thereby reducing fuel bills, and assisting with income maximisation by carrying out benefits checks whilst assessing homes.
  • 77. Re:NEW Delivery Mechanism Phase 3 – London-wide roll-out (April 2012 to March 2015) • 1.2 million domestic properties by 2015 subject to the leverage of additional finances from government • Will seek to introduce harder measures such as solid wall insulation, through pay as you save approach Phase 2 – London-wide roll-out (July 2010 to March 2012) • All Boroughs • Anticipate approx c. 200k – 500k Phase 1 – scope & mobilise homes treated (April 2009 – July 2010) • Technical trials: 817 homes, 786 tonnes of carbon saved • Demonstration projects: c. 10,000 homes • London Boroughs: Croydon, Camden, Lewisham, Harrow, Havering, Haringey, Hillingdon, Kingston, and Southwark
  • 78. • London: Homes Energy Appendix 5 Efficiency Programme (HEEP)
  • 79. London: Homes Energy Efficiency Programme (HEEP)
  • 80. London: Homes Energy Efficiency Programme (HEEP) Current Activity, Area Based and Referral / Grant Based Schemes
  • 81. HEEP: What is it?
  • 82. HEEP: The Customer Journey
  • 83. HEEP: The Delivery Programme
  • 84. HEEP: Delivery, Technical Trials, Demo Projects and Pan-London Roll-out
  • 85. HEEP: Lobbying and Financing
  • 86. HEEP: Lobbying and Financing (contd.)
  • 87. • The Future? “Warm Homes, Appendix 6 Greener Homes”, March 2010
  • 88. Proposed Strategy Document: March, 2010
  • 89. The main elements of the Warm Homes, Greener Homes Strategy (March, 2010) include: New local approach • Energy companies and local authorities teaming up to make homes more energy efficient - with energy companies required to help householders become more energy efficient. The new local partnership approach will take over from 2013, once the current Carbon Emissions Reduction Target ends • Building on the Local Carbon Framework pilots announced by Communities Secretary John Denham in December, which are a new approach for local authorities to set targets and put in place plans to reduce carbon emissions. Help to those who need it most • Direct help to those that need it most with energy companies targeting work towards lower income groups • A new 'Warm Homes' standard for social housing will see all social tenants receive free energy upgrades for their homes from energy companies, including fitted smart meters, leading to savings of up to £300 a year on bills • Consult on setting minimum energy efficiency standards for rented property to help tenants left in poorly insulated, cold and energy wasting properties - and ensuring standards are met before they are rented out
  • 90. contd. The main elements of the Warm Homes, Greener Homes Strategy (March, 2010) include Notes: 1. The Green Homes, Warmer Homes Home Energy Management Strategy can be found here: www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/what_we_do/consumers/saving_energy/hem/ hem.aspx (external link). 2. Note that the 29 per cent reduction is in non-traded emissions, i.e. emissions outside the EU ETS. Primarily, this means emissions from gas use in the home. 3. CLG will shortly be announcing new planning guidance for councils to tackle climate change through local plans. This will refresh planning policy to reflect the latest climate change predictions and ensure councils are planning for low carbon energy, low carbon living and the low carbon economy. CLG will also soon publish its own climate change strategy, putting the department's work to support local government at centre stage. 4. Insulate Today is managed by Behaviour Change. The Energy Saving Trust will be providing expert advice and support to the project: www.behaviourchange.org.uk (external link).
  • 91. • Stakeholder Consultation Appendix 7 • “Outreach” Marketing / Consultation
  • 92. Stakeholder Engagement Ten tips for good stakeholder engagement 1. Engage them early in the process. 2. Listen. Ask how they want to talk to you. Consider appointing stakeholder managers. 3. Make sure there is two-way dialogue. 4. Find out how much influence they have with your target audiences. 5. Remember they may have a different agenda. Always define what objectives you share. 6. Always remember they are busy people. Communicate appropriately, relevantly and thank them for their input. 7. Don’t forget stakeholders may talk to each other more than to you. 8. Keep your story straight and your offer transparent. 9. Don’t treat stakeholder relationships as a one-off communication at the start of a project: keep them informed; keep them involved. 10. But above all, treat your stakeholders as you would wish to be treated yourself… whichmeans making the effort to get to know them.
  • 93. London Borough of Havering : Household Energy Efficiency and Carbon Reduction Development of the Local Area Project Plan and Delivery Programme Outline Delivery Programme (SHESP?) Assumptions: 1. Budget = £1.5 million 2. Number of Low-Income Households fulfilling Eligibility Criteria = 500 (SHESP states 2,100 Cat2 and Cat3 households eligible) 3. Therefore, approximate cost of appropriate Practical Measures = £3,000 per household 4. 8 month period is purely for implementing the Practical Measures – that is, all other Key Actions have been, or will be, undertaken outside this time period Key Action Pre- Implement Practical Post- Contract Measures Phase Contract Phase Month No. Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Confirm Managing Agent Service Brief and Contract with Lead Officer Assemble Background Information, Base Data, Policies, Strategies, Plans and Programmes Define Relevant/Applicable Funding Stream(s) Explore Linkages to Other Funding Streams, Projects and Programmes Confirm Relevant Eligibility Criteria to be applied and “The Offer” Define Local Area(s) which are to be Targeted for Improvement Measures Target Relevant Eligible Client Group(s) Consultations with Key Stakeholders Determine Practical Improvement Measures, Costs and Procurement / Delivery Methods Implement Practical Measures to Agreeable Targeted Client Group(s) Monitor Brief, Service Level Agreement, Performance Agreement and Indicators Incorporate Improvements from Experience on next Phase 1
  • 94. London Borough of Havering : Household Energy Efficiency and Carbon Reduction Development of the Local Area Project Plan and Delivery Programme Funding Streams and Delivery Mechanisms Funding Warm Front Carbon Emissions Community Boiler Decent Winter Cold Stream Reduction Target Energy Scrappage Homes Fuel Weather (CERT) saving Scheme Payments Payments Programme (CESP) £209 £2 billion £8.1 billion million £959 million £3.36 billion £350 £400 £40 billion £125- million vouchers by 2010 400p/p Eligible  Private Sector All private sector domestic Community Households ALMOs or 60+ In receipt of Client Households and homes and social Groups with G-rated RSLs Partners pension Group Private Rented properties Housing or worse can also credit or Properties only Associations boilers qualify if Emp&Supp,  Households must Local they All JSA, have qualifying Authority receive: Income benefits or Open to all Pension Support, disability premium 125,000 Credit Prem for  Households with households Income disabled child under 16 living in Support  Homeowners owned, or JSA or aged over 60 who privately EMP&Supp do not qualify for rented Allowance the full Warm Front Grant will qualify for a £300 discount off the cost of a new gas boiler Eligibility  Income Support All domestic homes – Applications Households Weather to Criteria  CT Benefit energy suppliers can fund received under 60 can be 0  Housing Benefit measures in any household from areas apply – but degrees for  JSA and must direct at least ranked in the only if the 7 consec  Pension Credit 40% of carbon savings to a lowest 10% boiler being days 1/11 to  Income Related priority group of low income in England or scrapped is in 31/11 Emp&Sup and elderly customers 15% in working order Allowance Wales and & is the main  Working Tax Credit Scotland via boiler used to the IMD heat the home  Disability Living 2007 Allowance Households  Child Tax Credit over 60 can  HB apply  Inc Support regardless if  War Disability the boiler is in Pension working order  Industrial Injuries or not Benefit  Attendance Only Allowance Households If qualify for Warm Front you and Landlords cannot apply for Boiler who privately Scrappage Scheme own dwellings can apply People who own, or rent from a private Landlord, in receipt of certain benefits can apply If you apply for Boiler Scrappage you cannot apply for Warm Front funding 2
  • 95. London Borough of Havering : Household Energy Efficiency and Carbon Reduction Development of the Local Area Project Plan and Delivery Programme Government DECC DECC DECC DECC CLG DWP DWP Department Delivery Eaga Plc 6 largest Energy Utilities: Energy Energy Homes Pension Pension Agency  British Gas Supply Saving Trust and Service Service  EDF Energy Companies Communiti  Npower es Agency Job Centre  S&SE Plus  Scottish Power All run their own energy conservation programmes providing funding for energy efficiency measures directly to householders In addition, LAs and Housing Assocns. can work in partnership with energy suppliers in their local areas Practical  Loft Insulation  Energy Insulation £400 towards Energy No No Measures  Draught Proofing efficiency Fuel switch cost of boiler Efficient restrictions restrictions funds can  Cavity Wall measures to gas Boilers be used for Insulation  Heat Recovery Connection Cavity Wall  Hot Water Tank Ventilation to district and Loft Insulation Units; radiator heating Insulation  Repairs to panels scheme Existing Heating  Heating Ground Systems Systems incl. source heat  New Gas, Electric Controls pumps or Oil Central  Renewable / Micro- Heating sustainable generation  Renewable energy Heating Energy Measures measures controls where off the Gas Boiler Network replacement Installation of central heating to homes currently without Home energy audits Outcomes  Warmer Homes Target of 154 million Targeting Anticipated All homes  Lower Fuel Bills tonnes of CO2 hard-to-treat saving of to meet the  Reduction in Fuel properties 140,000 standard Poverty Expected to stimulate £32 tonnes CO2 by 2010  Reduced Carbon billion of investment by per year Emissions energy suppliers of which 40% to be invested in priority groups which includes those on low income and over 70’s Timescale From June 2000 - ongoing April 2008 to Dec 2012 Funding From By 2010 Rounds 7 to January 2010 11 from October 2009 to December 2010 3
  • 96. Funding Streams for Retrofitting Schemes within, and outside, London Funding Key Current London Retrofitting Schemes Key Current Retrofitting Schemes outside London Stream London Coldbusters Mayor’s Green Carbon Emissions Warm Community Social Low Byond Boiler Decent Winter Cold Warm Insulation Concierge Reduction Target (CERT) Front Energy Housing Carbon Decent Scrappage Homes Fuel Weather Zones Programme Scheme saving Energy Zone Homes Scheme Payments Payments Programme Saving (CESP) Prog £209 £3.36 billion (SHESP) £2 billion £8.1 million £959 £350 million £400 £40 billion by billion million vouchers 2010 £125- 400p/p Government DECC DECC DECC DCLG DECC CLG DWP DWP Department Delivery EDF Various British LDA 6 largest Energy Eaga Energy HCA Various Energy Homes and Pension Pension Gas Utilities: Plc Supply Saving Communities Service Service Agency  British Gas Companies Trust Agency  EDF Energy Job  Npower Centre  S&SE Plus  Scottish Power All run their own energy conservation programmes providing funding for energy efficiency measures directly to householders In addition, LAs and Housing Assocns. can work in partnership with energy suppliers in their local areas 1