Tony Felice, Sr. Strategist<br />
Tony Felice, Sr. Strategist<br />Frequent speaker on Visibility, Acquisition and Analytics<br />Over 15 years of experienc...
Offices and Denver, San Diego, and Carlsbad<br />Internet Presence Management agency<br />Over 50 full-time employees<br /...
Internet Presence Management<br />
“<br />if a new technology extends one or more of our senses outside us into the social world, then new ratios among all o...
All media is inherently social<br />Communication vector<br />Ubiquitous<br />Social media is a solidarity good<br />User ...
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />7<br />The Impact Social Media<br />The explosion in Consumer Generated Me...
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />8<br />What’s the buzz about?<br />Consumer Behavior<br />Measurability <b...
UNDERSTANDING THE AUDIENCE<br />
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />10<br />Audience Segmentation<br />Demographic<br />Geographic<br />Techno...
Understanding the Audience<br />Social Technographic Profiles, 20097<br />Joiners<br />The number of users that maintain a...
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />12<br />Third party research (such as Hitwise or comScore)<br />Focus grou...
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />13<br />Understanding the Audience<br />
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />14<br /><ul><li>Identify communities, discussions and influencers
Monitor challenges to your brand
Find relevant industry information
Inform your overall Social Media strategy
Who are the influencers?
What are these people saying?
When are these influencers active?
Where are the conversations happening?
Why are people talking (or staying quiet)?</li></ul>65 Million<br />20%<br />Understanding the Audience<br />active users ...
STRATEGY<br />
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />16<br />Laying the groundwork	<br />Technical<br />Verify infrastructure<b...
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />17<br />Goals and Objectives<br />Budget and Resources<br />Identify your ...
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />18<br />
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />19<br />Plan<br />Fail fast and adapt quickly<br />High visibility & Heavy...
JOINING THE CONVERSATION<br />
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />21<br />Understand the Dynamics<br />Relationships<br />Conversations<br /...
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />22<br />Lifecycle<br />Listen<br />Respond<br />Engage and Nurture<br />Cr...
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />23<br />The currency of social interaction is trust.  The equity is influe...
DETERMINING ROI<br />
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />25<br />Determining ROI<br />Business has not changed, this type of market...
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />26<br />Hard metrics – financial impact<br />Cost reduction<br />Revenue g...
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />27<br />Maintain an activity timeline<br />All events driven by strategy<b...
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />28<br />Compile transactional precursors<br />Pull the hard numbers<br />S...
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />29<br />Do events in the campaign coincide with fluctuations in transactio...
STAYING CONNECTED<br />
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />31<br />Social media should be approached as a long-term strategy, support...
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />32<br />Understand long-term expectations<br />Growth and Impact<br />Reso...
CASE STUDIES<br />
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />34<br />Raising awareness<br />Adding value<br />Increasing sales<br />Tar...
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />35<br />Blogger Rebellion<br />“Dell Hell”<br />Blindsided from ignorance<...
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />36<br />The Hub<br />Failed mySpace clone<br />Encouraged teens to upload ...
10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />37<br />Recovery<br />Ratings and Reviews<br />The Checkout Blog<br />voic...
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crowded space: a business case for social media?

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Red Door Interactive brings you this look at reaching target consumers through social media, but more importantly why companies would want to and whether or not a strategy of this type is justified. (from a talk given Oct 12,2010 at Leeds School of Business, University of Colorado, Boulder)

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  • ***CLICK IN TO SCROLL*****This is: the crowded space / the business case for social media marketingWe are going to look at reaching target consumers through social media, but more importantly why we would want to and whether or not a strategy of this type is justified.So, this is usually the part where the audience is asked to please silence their cellphones, If you have, turn ‘em on, or don’t pretend like they were off to begin with. I’ve got a screen here that’s monitoring twitter, and I’ll be able to see any questions and comments that come through. I might not respond, but I will definitely see them. So, those of you that are on twitter, please tweet along with the hashtagreddoor, and for those of you that have no idea what a hashtag IS, please pay attention.***
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  • ***CLICK IN TO SCROLL*****Nearly 50 years ago, Marshall McLuhan postulated that “if a new technology extends one or more of our senses outside us into the social world, then new ratios among all of our senses will occur in that particular culture”, and depending on our interpretations of what’s being said, I think we’ve seen this kind of paradigm shift occur over the last few years with the attention toward social media***
  • ***CLICK IN TO SCROLL*****All media is inherently social - Media is a communication vector, and communication IS SOCIAL.SOCIAL - MEDIAWhat’s referred to as ‘social media’ is simply a manifestation of our inherently social nature enhanced by a level of technological prowess that we’ve become BORED with. We’re not talking about the latest and greatest thing in technology, we’re talking about things that have become so ubiquitous that they’ve become commonplace, and that’s when things become socially interesting – when I can talk about it with anyone, that’s when media becomes valuable. Social Media is a solidarity good – the more people use it, the more valuable it becomes.As far as I’m concerned, social media is a really broad category.  It is technology that empowers non-technical people to communicate.  The lines are very blurry, and it could arguably go back to the telephone or the printing press – perhaps we simply don’t recognize that association because no one was ever successful at pushing advertising into people’s phone conversations?  So, it’s not one thing – it’s lots and lots of things, so the name is really inappropriate, and confusing, really. Let’s call it the radical socioeconomic displacement of capitalistic disinformation. No?Blogs, wikis, lifestreams (like facebook) for our purposes here, we’ll focus on that transparent and boring old technology known as the internet, and a subclass of that known sometimes as User-Generated Content, and as that relates to advertising, it’s also referred to as WOM.Now, this user generated content is nothing new, it’s merely gained momentum by measurably affecting interruption advertising and push messaging.  Some companies are embracing a social approach simply because it&apos;s the new IN thing, but the savvy companies embrace it because of the metrics they can extract.I’m very intrigued with the marketing application, and the way this technology is impacting traditional, but frankly I&apos;m surprised by the seemingly widespread confusion associated with engagement.  This is the stuff we learned in kindergarten – you be nice, people will play with you.  When you’re a jerk or a showoff, they split.***
  • ***CLICK IN TO SCROLL*****Here’s some data from a recent Nielsen Survey which queriedover 25 thousand Internet consumers from 50 different countries. That huge line at the top is telling us that consumers trust their friends recommendations with 90% confidence – that makes sense. But just below that we see that the people surveyed trust the opinions of strangers at 70%. Those two things are completely independent from corporate messaging, and we can see that we are reaching the tipping point of influence – WOM carries more weight than anything that a brand can say about itself.The quote alongside here seems to indicate that reliance on WOM drives SM, but the converse is just as well true. A classic conundrum - Which came first?Another statement made in this release tellsadvertisers to “be encouraged by the fact that brand websites are trusted at that same 70 percent level as online consumer opinions,” which really obscures an issue that is really tormenting brands and agencies – the fact that consumer opinion is weighted equally with brand websites -GLOBALLY. What’s really interesting to note here is consumers’ opinion in the US outperforms the website by 2%.This kind of data really drives home the importance of listening to what’s going on in this groundswell, but I believe that levels of consumer trust in traditional advertising will continue to drop, and media in general will evolve to the point that the our concept of media will become based on the level of interaction we have with it.  ***
  • ***CLICK IN TO SCROLL*****Anyhow, I believe that beyond ubiquity, there is one core reason why the topic is so hot right now, that consumers have become jaded by decades of interruption. We tivo our commercials. We hang up on telemarketers. We throw away junk mail. We walk into movies late.  Couple those psychological factors with the measurability of online activity, and the availability of these word-of-mouth vehicles, and we have the shadow of a successful messaging vector.   I say a it’s only a shadow, because the point of message origination, and the messaging itself is nearly impossible to control.  To fully flesh out this vector, we need to understand where point A is, and I think that challenge leads a lot of people into the confusion around engagement that we see today.   Companies wishing to engage this space should understand two things: That control was a function of broadcast messaging, and does not exist here. In social media, we trade control for influenceThat social media represents a copernican revolution in the way the company interacts with it’s customers, and it’s essential to get high level, preferably c-level buy in. In this space, engagement is truly social, and the conversation can go south – it needs to be honest, forthright and transparent, with a very trusted spokesperson at the wheel.  Our goal would be to plant the seed.  It’s kinda like pushing a car out of a snowdrift.  Nobody’s going to be able to push the car out in one lunge – the car is far too heavy, and the ground is too slick.  The best you can do is slowly start rocking the car, give it a nudge, let it rock back past where it was, and give it another shove.  The car absorbs your energy, which makes it seem hard to push, but it also stores the energy you exert, and after some effort, the car has momentum of its own, and pops out of the drift.  That was a bit too esoteric, huh? Yeah, a little rich.  I think the point comes through though, that despite all the admonitions to engage with otherwise socially responsible behavior, to be effective in word-of-mouth, marketers have to not only communicate transparently, but instigate subtly.***
  • ***CLICK IN TO SCROLL*****Point A is the Audience.***
  • ***CLICK IN TO SCROLL*****Understanding the Audience is going to start with segmentation - you really have to understand how your audience breaks down – some demographic groups skew very differently when looking at technographic profile.The Technographic profile is a term coined by Forrester, and basically helps us to drill down into a segment and identify that segment’s level of participation in social. Creators – these are the people that maintain a blog, a website, post videosCritics – reviewers, online opinionsJoiners – maintain a profileCollectors – taggers and RSS feedsSpectators - read blogs/forums/reviews, watch videos, or listen to podcastsInactives – well, they’re pretty boring really.These categories aren’t mutually exclusive, they do cross-pollinate. For example, a Creator is definitely a Joiner, and could easily be a Critic as well as a Spectator. A Collector could be a Spectator. A Joiner could be a Critic. But, Inactives, yeah they’re pretty boring.***
  • ***CLICK IN TO SCROLL*****Inactives -43%Spectators 44%Collectors 58%Joiners 40%Critics 48%Creators 17%***
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  • ***CLICK IN TO SCROLL*****Here’s a quick screenshot of a free, web-based tool called social mention, with an example search on the term ‘pepsi’. This is a real time platform providing very quick results from multiple sources (such as blogs, Twitter, Facebook, FriendFeed, YouTube, Digg, and blogs) You can see that there are various sources to choose from in the top of the tool, and it looks a lot like traditional search results with the addition of various metrics alongside – some top keywords that occur in the results, number of authors… if you actually take it for a spin, you’ll see quite a few metrics down the left side, but as with all tools, it does take some experimentation to determine which metrics are valuable to you.Across the tools, we do see different metrics and terminology, but keywords, sources and sentiment are pretty common.***
  • ***CLICK IN TO SCROLL*****our goal is ultimately to identify communities, discussions, and influencers, but also to locate challenges.Brand Challenges: A customer who’s had a negative experience can impact brands like never before. Really quick, let’s look at this statistic from facebook – 65 million active users access the site through a mobile device. These consumers can and do express their experiences immediately online. Other challenges obviously, come from competitors’ products or marketing efforts We want to look for relevant industry information //key trends, sentiment of the general consumer, and the influential personalities in your spaceWe need to use our understandign of the audience to inform the social media strategy.Who are your influencers? //Which websites and bloggers are mentioning your selected keywords? Which have large audiences? Obviously, these are the people you’re going to want to reach out to.What are they saying? Look for the most common words or phrases that appear alongside mentions of your selected keywords, and consider augmenting your list with them. Determine whether this instance is a positive or negative mention. When? Look at the activity// Do online discussions increase after your company runs a promotion or issues a press release? Clearly, this will help determine the effectiveness of those efforts at driving awareness and interest.Where are your chosen keywords being mentioned online? If blogs dominate the discussion, consider participation to help shape the conversation. Maybe it’s time tostart a corporate blog (or update it, which is more often the case)Why are people talking? //What key drivers recur in the conversations online? //Perhaps there is an overwhelming sentiment toward a particular product? Do customers have a strong tendency to recommend a particular product, or even a particular usageOnce we have compiled solid behavioral and traffic data on our target segments, then we’re ready to define a strategy.***
  • ***CLICK IN TO SCROLL*****now that understand WHAT it is, WHY it is, and whether or not the target demographic is using it, we’re ready to begin defining a strategy***
  • ***CLICK IN TO SCROLL*****Some initial considerations:Verify your infrastructure – make sure the destination site has been load tested, and can withstand the flood of traffic you’re hoping for.Analytics – any responsible marketing strategy will be able to identify ROI, and social media is not different. We’ll take a deeper dive into ROI a bit later, but we can’t get there without analytics.Traffic benchmarks – if we want to be able to show a before and after snapshot, we’ll need benchmarks, but fortunately, most analytics packages have this feature built in, but do confirm.Establish a policy – alongside here is a quote from Intel’s policy, which is one of my favorites. In it, they are very honest, objective, and forward-thinking. There will no doubt be a few squeaky wheels, and it’s very good advice to plan for it.Next, let’s consider visibility – the thought that if you build it, they will come, may work well in movies, but not so much on the web. How are you going to let consumers know that you’re ready to engage with them on this level? Most successful campaigns are blended, utilizing email, PR, and possibly even traditional.So, what’s plan B? I hate to sound like a scratched CD, but control is not an option. Despite due diligence and informed decisions, the grand plan may not come off the way you’ve hoped. So what’s best? Fail fast. Monitor the progress of the strategy closely and be willing and able to adapt. Your contingency plans should also account for third party outages – what’s going to happen when twitter goes down?High-level buy-in – again, social media engagement will radically change the way your company communicates with it’s customer, so it’s prudent to make this understood all the way up the chain.***
  • ***CLICK IN TO SCROLL*****So, now that we have the groundwork covered off, what are the next steps?Well, this may seem obvious, but our strategy is going to hinge on budget. Despite what you may have heard, social media is not free, and a gregarious strategy can require tremendous resources to initiate and maintain, so let’s make sure we know what we’ve got to work with. If you’re looking for something with a proven track record and extremely high ROI, consider an email campaign, but that’s another presentation…Identify your motivation, ask yourselves the question – what are you doing here?Market research? Fabulous! We spend countless dollars on market research, asking people what they think about products, and here are all these millions of people telling us what they’re doing.Customer Service? Now, beyond the types of things that we see that are directly related to customer service, like pushing requests through twitter (ala bestbuy, comcast, qwest) are there any creative applications here? Suppose you have a line of products that evoke an endless stream of mundane questions, and an established base of brand loyalists? Well, the etail company backcountry.com was in just this situation, so they created an integrated forum in which their ‘experts’ could (and do!) answer these questions for curious customers.crowdsourcing? Anyone familiar with Threadless? They’ve brought social media full circle, back into the real world. They engage customers to submit and vote on slogans through social media, the highest rated of which become t-shirts. That’s crowdsourcing.Advertising? Remember, in social media, we trade control for influence. If you’re not ready to relinquish control, you’re not ready for this. The best we can hope is to influence. We think back to the basics of normative economics in which everything has a value attached to it, and realize that just doesn’t fly in social interaction. If we try to financially incentivize social behavior, it could backfire easily. If you think I’m wrong, try leaving a tip the next time your mother cooks you dinner. The currency of social interaction is trust.Using the monitoring tools we discussed earlier, you will need to select the appropriate channels for this campaign, any strategy that’s willing to define the channel without due diligence is suspect.Within these channels, locate the key influencers. These may not necessarily be people with huge followings, but quality followings.At this point, we’re ready to make an informed definitions of LOE and KPI.***
  • ***CLICK IN TO SCROLL*****Plan for high visibility – anything worth doing is worth doing rightHeavy engagement – levels will be very low at the beginning, and you don’t want to appear as though you’re talking to yourself, or broadcasting, but you should be prepared to respond quickly. People have the expectation that they are being listened to. For companies that are used to the velocity of impact that comes from “mass” media, the slow, steady approach may be frustrating.Basics: provide value – without good content, you’ve got nothing - unless you’re a celebrity, then it’s just about being a celebrity.Expertise and Opinions are a good way to energize your base – where can you provide a solution or insight?Another way to encourage interaction is to herald certain messaging with expectations, and meet those expectations, building trust.Design social objects: everyone raise their hands please? The best way to influence behavior is to give them something to imitate. These are social objects.Contests also work well, and the winners are generally very vocal, socially.***
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  • ***CLICK IN TO SCROLL*****How did you feel the first time you came to university***
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  • Web marketers are spoiled. They are so focused on analytics, and the measurability of everything – drawing a line from point a to point b. We can’t necessarily connect the dots that way in social media.So… forget the technology for a second.How did anyone ever sell outdoor - billboards, bus benches etc?
  • By drawing connections to what the client cares about – Cost reduction&amp; Revenue Gen.These soft metrics might sound cool, but so what? How do we DEMONSTRATE “so what”
  • Maintain an activity profile…Track what you’re doingConfigure analytic funnels…Track what’s happening
  • Compile the soft metrics (transactional precursors)And the hard metricsAnd OVERLAY them.
  • When measurable events affect the bottom line, we can hypothesize that our actions had impact. The more remarkable the reaction, the more likely it is that we had impact.These numbers may still be fuzzy.But they mean something to decision makers.
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  • ***CLICK IN TO SCROLL*****Social media should be approached as a long-term strategy, supported over time by consistent communication and valuable content – you don’t want to just show up and leave – remember, the currency of social media is trust, and dependability is key.Short-term campaigns work best for follower acquisition, short bursts of increased activity to support a seasonal promotion, larger campaign or just to do something nice for your followersTo be successful, you have to stay connected***
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  • ***CLICK IN TO SCROLL*****walmart - &quot;communities already exist, instead***
  • ***CLICK IN TO SCROLL*****What’s the future of social media?  Personally, I think it will be people connecting not only with people, but identifying with brands.  It’s not been fully executed yet, but I suspect that somewhere, someone is working on a social community that panders to people’s greed and ego, and gives them an opportunity to brag (or lie!) about the products they consume.  Social media will also become more mobile, and more geo-aware.  Could it even evolve to the point where, sitting in a café, you hold up your smart phone, and on the screen you see an image of the people sitting at the tables, with icons hovering above their heads and hyperlinks to their profiles?***
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  • crowded space: a business case for social media?

    1. 1. Tony Felice, Sr. Strategist<br />
    2. 2. Tony Felice, Sr. Strategist<br />Frequent speaker on Visibility, Acquisition and Analytics<br />Over 15 years of experience in Interactive Marketing<br />tfelice@reddoor.biz<br />http://twitter.com/tonyfelice <br />Today’s Presenter<br />
    3. 3. Offices and Denver, San Diego, and Carlsbad<br />Internet Presence Management agency<br />Over 50 full-time employees<br />Diverse client base <br />Red Door Interactive<br />
    4. 4. Internet Presence Management<br />
    5. 5. “<br />if a new technology extends one or more of our senses outside us into the social world, then new ratios among all of our senses will occur in that particular culture”<br />-Marshall McLuhan<br />The Gutenberg Galaxy: The Making of Typographic Man,1962<br />
    6. 6. All media is inherently social<br />Communication vector<br />Ubiquitous<br />Social media is a solidarity good<br />User Generated Content<br />Blogs<br />Wikis<br />Lifestreaming<br />Review sites<br />NOT a broadcast (or push) medium<br />1 Billion<br />4.1 Billion<br />Social Media<br />Videos viewed per day on YouTube.1 YouTube outperforms Yahoo! as the second largest search engine.2<br />Source: YouTube, ComScore<br />SMS text messages that are currently sent each day, nearly doubling the number from last year.3<br />Source: CITA<br />
    7. 7. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />7<br />The Impact Social Media<br />The explosion in Consumer Generated Media over the last couple of years means consumers’ reliance on word of mouth in the decision-making process, either from people they know or online consumers they don’t, has increased significantly.”4<br />- Jonathan Carson<br />President of Online, International, The Nielsen Company<br />Consumer Trust in Advertising*5<br />Source: The Nielsen Company<br />*Respondents reported some degree of trust in the respective advertising medium<br />e.g. 90% of respondents trusted "completely" or "somewhat" recommendations <br />from people they know5<br />
    8. 8. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />8<br />What’s the buzz about?<br />Consumer Behavior<br />Measurability <br />Availability and ubiquity<br />Challenges<br />Point of message origination<br />Lack of (direct) control<br />Shift in power<br />Success requires<br />Honesty, transparency<br />Solid plan, and a trusted helmsman<br />Synergy between the medium and the target<br />2 Billion<br />The Impact of Social Media<br />pieces of content shared weekly on Facebook 6<br />Source: Facebook<br />
    9. 9. UNDERSTANDING THE AUDIENCE<br />
    10. 10. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />10<br />Audience Segmentation<br />Demographic<br />Geographic<br />Technographic Profile<br />Creators<br />Critics<br />Joiners<br />Collectors<br />Spectators<br />Inactives<br />72%<br />73%<br />Understanding the Audience<br />Of domestic internet users have some degree of trust in opinions and reviews posted online.5<br />Source: Nielsen<br />Domestic internet users visit social media sites.7<br />Source: Forrester Research<br />
    11. 11. Understanding the Audience<br />Social Technographic Profiles, 20097<br />Joiners<br />The number of users that maintain an online profile has more than doubled since 2007.7<br />Source: Forrester Research<br />Inactives<br />The number of users that are inactive in social media has dropped nearly 60% since 2007.7<br />Source: Forrester Research<br />.2008. 2009(est)<br />
    12. 12. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />12<br />Third party research (such as Hitwise or comScore)<br />Focus groups<br />Targeted emails and customer surveys<br />Monitor social channels<br />Monitoring is critical<br />List of tools in “Resources” appendix<br />Ensure analytics are installed on the target site<br />Describes traffic patterns, inbound vectors<br />Identifies geographics<br />Details keywords <br />Understanding the Audience<br />25%<br />of search results for the world’s top 20 largest brands are links to user-generated content.9<br />Source: SES Magazine<br />
    13. 13. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />13<br />Understanding the Audience<br />
    14. 14. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />14<br /><ul><li>Identify communities, discussions and influencers
    15. 15. Monitor challenges to your brand
    16. 16. Find relevant industry information
    17. 17. Inform your overall Social Media strategy
    18. 18. Who are the influencers?
    19. 19. What are these people saying?
    20. 20. When are these influencers active?
    21. 21. Where are the conversations happening?
    22. 22. Why are people talking (or staying quiet)?</li></ul>65 Million<br />20%<br />Understanding the Audience<br />active users currently access Facebook through their mobile devices … 50% more active than non-mobile users.6<br />Source: Facebook<br />Twitter traffic comes thru the website. Where does the other 80% come from?10<br />Source: Guardian<br />
    23. 23. STRATEGY<br />
    24. 24. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />16<br />Laying the groundwork <br />Technical<br />Verify infrastructure<br />Analytics Installation<br />Benchmark traffic profile<br />Operational<br />Establish a Policy<br />Visibility<br />Contingencies<br />Plan B<br />Third party outages<br />High level buy-in<br />Strategy<br />The Good, the Bad, but not the Ugly. If the content is positive or negative and in context to the conversation, then we approve the content, regardless of whether it's favorable or unfavorable to Intel. However if the content is ugly, offensive, denigrating and completely out of context, then we reject the content.”11<br />-Intel’s Social Media Policy<br />
    25. 25. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />17<br />Goals and Objectives<br />Budget and Resources<br />Identify your motivation<br />Market research<br />Customer service <br />Crowdsourcing / Research & Development<br />Advertising (Influencing) & Sales<br />Select appropriate channels<br />Locate key influencers<br />Identify Key Performance Indicators (KPI)<br />Strategy<br />Over and over again, connecting people with one another is what lasts online. Some folks thought it was about technology, but it’s not.”<br />-Seth Godin, author of “Small is the New Big”, pg 208<br />
    26. 26. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />18<br />
    27. 27. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />19<br />Plan<br />Fail fast and adapt quickly<br />High visibility & Heavy engagement<br />Basics<br />Provide value<br />Expertise & opinions<br />Set and meet expectations<br />Design interactivity<br />Social Objects<br />Contests<br />4pm<br />Strategy<br />may be the best time to deliver social messaging. While the general traffic patterns on twitter remain relatively constant throughout the day, retweets peak at 4pm.12<br />Source: Dan Zarrella, The Science of Retweets, pg. 20<br />
    28. 28. JOINING THE CONVERSATION<br />
    29. 29. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />21<br />Understand the Dynamics<br />Relationships<br />Conversations<br />Phatic Communications aka “Small talk”<br />Find a connection, a commonality<br />Joining the Conversation<br />
    30. 30. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />22<br />Lifecycle<br />Listen<br />Respond<br />Engage and Nurture<br />Create Buzz<br />Be Transparent<br />Converse <br />Joining the Conversation<br />
    31. 31. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />23<br />The currency of social interaction is trust. The equity is influence.<br />As in real life, hard won, easily lost.<br />Joining the Conversation<br />
    32. 32. DETERMINING ROI<br />
    33. 33. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />25<br />Determining ROI<br />Business has not changed, this type of marketing is simply a shift in the way business is done.<br />Hard Metrics<br />Soft Metrics<br />
    34. 34. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />26<br />Hard metrics – financial impact<br />Cost reduction<br />Revenue generation <br />Soft metrics - transactional precursors<br />Brand Mentions<br />View-throughs<br />Click-throughs<br />Traffic<br />Impressions<br />Determining ROI<br />
    35. 35. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />27<br />Maintain an activity timeline<br />All events driven by strategy<br />Any events that may impact the campaign<br />Press Releases<br />News Articles<br />Awards and Recognition<br />Any milestone events in the campaign<br />Social Reach (network milestones)<br />Shared Content<br />Configure analytic funnels (goals)<br />Determining ROI<br />
    36. 36. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />28<br />Compile transactional precursors<br />Pull the hard numbers<br />Sales Revenue<br />Number of Transactions<br />Customer Count<br />(Identify new vs. repeat)<br />Overlay all the timelines<br />Transactional precursors<br />Traffic <br />Funnel goal completions<br />Conversions<br />Determining ROI<br />
    37. 37. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />29<br />Do events in the campaign coincide with fluctuations in transactional metrics?<br />Frequency<br />How often customers are transacting?<br />Reach<br />Number of Customers (new vs. existing)<br />Yield<br />$ per transaction<br />Determining ROI<br />
    38. 38. STAYING CONNECTED<br />
    39. 39. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />31<br />Social media should be approached as a long-term strategy, supported over time by consistent communication and valuable content<br />Short-term campaigns work best for follower acquisition, short bursts of increased activity to support a seasonal promo or blended campaign<br />To be successful, you have to stay connected.<br />Staying Connected<br />
    40. 40. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />32<br />Understand long-term expectations<br />Growth and Impact<br />Resources <br />Staying Connected<br />
    41. 41. CASE STUDIES<br />
    42. 42. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />34<br />Raising awareness<br />Adding value<br />Increasing sales<br />Targeted Campaigns<br />$3M attributed to Twitter alone<br />Connecting with customers<br />Case Study: Dell<br />We thought, ‘Great-this has a really short lead time, and it will let us communicate our message effectively. We started using it for one-way communication. <br />…We realized that people were really interested in talking with us.”<br />- Stefanie Nelson, manager of demand generation at Dell Outlet.<br />
    43. 43. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />35<br />Blogger Rebellion<br />“Dell Hell”<br />Blindsided from ignorance<br />Listened<br />Joined the conversation<br />Learned the right way to interact<br />Reached out to community<br />Acknowledged customer<br />Timeline: 3+ years<br />Case Study: Dell<br />…clueless Dell, your customers can just blog their questions and answers without you. Or should I say, former customers?”<br />- Stefanie Nelson, manager of demand generation at Dell Outlet.<br />
    44. 44. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />36<br />The Hub<br />Failed mySpace clone<br />Encouraged teens to upload photos, videos, shopping lists<br />Jim and Laura, bloggers<br />Disclosed as a hoax funded by PR agency, Edelman<br />Facebook Failure<br />Attempt to attract college students<br />All they got were haters<br />Case Study: Wal-Mart<br />Communities already exist…Instead you should be asking yourself, what can I do to help this community do what it wants to do?”<br />-Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook, CEO<br />
    45. 45. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />37<br />Recovery<br />Ratings and Reviews<br />The Checkout Blog<br />voice for Wal-Mart’s product folks<br />Elevenmoms<br />Colony of mommy bloggers<br />Transparent, full disclosure<br />The real success: High level buy in<br />Case Study: Wal-Mart<br />…we’re not hesitant, we’re ready to embrace this stuff.”<br />-H. Lee Scott, Walmart, CEO<br />
    46. 46. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />38<br />Let’s explore whether a company such as White Wave should take this approach, and if so, how they could be successful…<br />Hypothetical: White Wave Foods<br />
    47. 47. SUMMARY<br />
    48. 48. QUESTIONS<br />
    49. 49. Ground Floor is a new agency within Red Door established to give students hands-on experience managing and growing a real interactive agency.<br />TEAM WORK <br />developing interactive strategy<br />designing and implementing integrated programs<br />analyzing campaign performance<br />managing clients, employees, and vendors<br />EXPERIENCE <br />work directly with clients and vendors<br />professional support from your RDI counterpart & faculty support<br />Internship Program<br />
    50. 50. Email: tfelice@reddoor.biz<br />LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/tonyfelice<br />Twitter: http://twitter.com/tonyfelice<br />Web: http://www.reddoor.biz<br />Blog: http://reddoorbuzz.com<br />Intern Program: http://groundfloorbuzz.com/<br />Email: dobiz@reddoor.biz<br />Twitter: @reddoorand @reddoorjobs<br />Contact the Speaker<br />More Info on Red Door Interactive<br />
    51. 51. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />43<br />Citations and Reference<br />
    52. 52. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />44<br />Slideography<br />
    53. 53. 10/18/2010<br />©2009 Red Door Interactive<br />45<br />Resources<br />

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