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Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood
Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood
Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood
Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood
Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood
Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood
Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood
Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood
Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood
Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood
Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood
Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood
Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood
Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood
Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood
Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood
Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood
Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood
Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood
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Extended Writing - Caroline Sherwood

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  • This "near and far" theory of transfer suggested that some problems and tasks are so nearly alike that transfer of learning occurs easily and naturally. A particular problem or task is studied and practiced to a high level of automaticity. When a nearly similar problem or task is encountered, it is automatically solved with little or no conscious thought. This is called near transfer. The shoe-tying example given above illustrates near transfer. A major goal in learning to read is to develop a high level of decoding automaticity. Then your conscious mind can pay attention to the meaning and implications of the material you are reading. A significant fraction of children are able to achieve this by the end of the third grade.Many potential transfer of learning situations do not lend themselves to the automaticity approach. There are many problems that are somewhat related, but that in some sense are relatively far removed from each other. A person attempting to make the transfer of learning between two such problems does not automatically "see" or sense the connections between the two problems. Far transfer often requires careful analysis and deep thinking.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Supporting Extended Writing
    • 2. Low road transfer happens when stimulus conditions in the transfer context are sufficiently similar to those in a prior context of learning to trigger well-developed semi- automatic responses. High road transfer, in contrast, depends on mindful abstraction from the context of learning or application and a deliberate search for connections: What is the general pattern? What is needed? What principles might apply? What is known that might help? Such transfer is not in general reflexive. It demands time for exploration and the investment of mental effort. If they’re doing it in English – why can’t they do it in my subject? Salomon, G., & Perkins, D. (1988, September). Teaching for transfer. Educational Leadership, 22-32.
    • 3. Explain/analyse the planning and organisation of recording sessions, within health and safety requirements. Write a description of your composition. Why did people believe in witches in the 16th and 17th century? Explain/analyse how Steinbeck uses language to influence the reader’s view of Curley.
    • 4. Explain/analyse how Steinbeck uses language to influence the reader’s view of Curley. “He slashed at Lennie with his left, and then smashed down his nose with a right”
    • 5. Steinbeck uses powerful verbs in chapter 3 of ‘Of Mice and Men’ to influence the reader’s view of Curley. “he slashed at Lennie with his left and then smashed down his nose with a right”. The powerful verb “smashed” suggests that something has broken into loads of pieces because when you smash a plate for example, it breaks beyond repair. Perhaps the other powerful verb “slashed” runs along side of it as alliteration to suggest Curley’s fists have different was of fighting. Furthermore, maybe Steinbeck uses “slashed” to suggest that when Curley is hitting Lennie he is not only hurting him physically, he’s also breaking his emotions on the inside; “slashing” their dreams; “slashing” the light and letting in the dark; “slashing” the goodness inside of Lennie to get him to fight. This has influenced my view of Curley – I do not feel sorry for him. He is clearly using his power as the boss’ son and is dangerous to both Gorge and Lennie.
    • 6. Explain/analyse how Steinbeck uses language to influence the reader’s view of Curley. “He slashed at Lennie with his left, and then smashed down his nose with a right”
    • 7. Explain/analyse how Steinbeck uses language to influence the reader’s view of Curley. Let’s start together… Complete as a share piece of writing.
    • 8. Now look at someone else’s work… Annotate it for the key ingredients (like we did together at the start).
    • 9. “His arms gradually bent at the elbows and his hands closed into fists. He stiffened and went into a slight crouch.”
    • 10. The result is… This results in… As a result… Resulting in… Initiating… Triggering… The effect of this is… As a consequence… Consequently… Inevitably… This, in turn, causes… Furthermore… This suggests… Because… Perhaps… You need to know the ingredients for every piece of writing you ask your students to do…  To explain how/why something works/has happened  chronological order  present tense  active voice  third person  connectives related to sequencing and cause and effect  Paragraph cohesion  may include a glossary of key words  impersonal language
    • 11. Super-challenge Triggering… The effect of this is… As a consequence… Consequently… Inevitably… This, in turn, causes… Furthermore… You need to know the ingredients for every piece of writing you ask your students to do…  To explain how/why something works/has happened  chronological order  present tense  active voice  third person  connectives related to sequencing and cause and effect  Paragraph cohesion  may include a glossary of key words  impersonal language Core: This suggests… Because… Perhaps… Challenge: The result is… This results in… As a result… Resulting in… Initiating…
    • 12. Your first challengetask… Create an ingredients list for an extended piece of writing you ask your students to complete. Want more of a challenge? Begin to differentiate your ingredients list (like we did with the connectives). Need some help? Take a look at some of the help sheets at the front.
    • 13. Your second challengetask… Create an example of the writing you are asking for. It does not need to be ‘perfect’…in fact it can be very constructive to have an example which needs a little attention. We must be able to identify the ingredients within your example. Want more of a challenge? Begin to differentiate your examples – can you create an A/A* a B and a C example?
    • 14. Your last challengetask… In your lessons use the materials you’ve created today and follow the sequence for writing. I’ve created these PowerPoint slides…might they be useful? Your last challengetask…
    • 15. Extended writing task title Do we need to find the key words within the question? What are we being asked to do? Wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww
    • 16. Having seen the example what are the key ingredients we must include? * * * * *
    • 17. How could I start?
    • 18. Want more of a challenge? ................................................................................................... Need some help? ................................................................................................... Don’t forget to include our key ingredients: * * * * *
    • 19. Would this be useful to support extended writing?

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