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Chapter1 Chapter1 Presentation Transcript

  • American Government and Politics: Deliberation, Democracy, and Citizenship Chapter One Deliberation and Citizenship in Service of Freedom and Democracy
  • Chapter One: Learning Objectives
    • Describe the difference between a “deliberative” democracy and one based on self-interest
    • Define democracy and describe the various forms it can take
  • Chapter One: Learning Objectives
    • Explain the key principles of the Declaration of Independence and describe some ways in which they have influenced American history
    • Describe what liberal democracies are and how they compare to other kinds of political systems in the modern world
  • Chapter One: Learning Objectives
    • Explain the knowledge that citizens should have to contribute to decisions about the common good in the United States
  • Introduction
    • How to study politics
    • Politics is “who gets what, when, how”
    • Government officials do not always make decisions based on their self-interest
    • Need to consider political actions that benefit the “public interest”
  • Introduction
    • How the pursuit of public interest works
    • Affects a variety of political activities
    • Policymaking relies on voluntary compliance with law
    • A healthy political community requires volunteerism
  • Citizenship and Deliberation
    • Civic virtues important to citizenship
    • Self-restraint
    • Self-reliance
    • Civic knowledge
    • Civic participation and service
  • Citizenship and Deliberation What does deliberation mean? Do you believe citizens have a responsibility to contribute to deliberations about politics, governance, and the common good?
  • Theories of American Democracy
    • Competing theories of democracy
    • Group theory
    • Pluralist theory
    • Elite theory
    • Rational choice theory
  • Democracy What is a democracy? What is the difference between a direct and representative democracy? What type of democracy do we have in the United States?
  • Democracy: The Democratic Tradition in the United States Local self-government was prevalent in the colonies, but it was not practical to practice direct democracy beyond the local level. Representatives were sent to colonial legislatures. There were restrictions placed on voting so not every citizen had a voice in government.
  • Democracy: Why the Framers Chose Representative Democracy
    • Why representative democracy?
    • Direct democracy may be dangerous
    • Representative democracy allows for deliberation
    • Representative democracy may include “a greater variety of parties or interests”
  • Democracy: Direct Democracy in Modern American Politics
    • Tools of direct democracy in America
    • Initiatives
    • Referendums
    • The Progressive movement fought to empower citizens with tools of direct democracy.
  • Democracy: Applying the Definition: Rule by the People What is popular sovereignty? Maurice Savage/Alamy
  • Freedom and American Democracy What are some of the key principles of American democracy stated in the Declaration of Independence? Do you believe those principles of democracy have always been promoted by the actions of government?
  • Freedom and American Democracy: Expressing the American Mind
    • Key principles of the Declaration of Independence
    • We hold these truths to be self-evident
    • This means that the truths are “evident without proof or reasoning”
  • Freedom and American Democracy: Expressing the American Mind
    • Key principles of the Declaration of Independence
    • That all men are created equal
      • Has the government always treated all men equally?
      • What are unalienable rights?
  • Freedom and American Democracy: Expressing the American Mind
    • Key principles of the Declaration of Independence
    • Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness
    • All people are entitled to natural rights
  • Freedom and American Democracy: Expressing the American Mind
    • Key principles of the Declaration of Independence
    • To secure these rights, governments are instituted among men
    • To what extent do we need government in our lives?
  • Freedom and American Democracy: Expressing the American Mind
    • Key principles of the Declaration of Independence
    • Deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed
    • What is the difference between active consent and tacit consent ?
  • Freedom and American Democracy: Expressing the American Mind
    • Key principles of the Declaration of Independence
    • It is the right of the people to alter it or abolish it
    • How may citizens alter or abolish government?
  • Freedom and American Democracy: Expressing the American Mind
    • Key principles of the Declaration of Independence
    • Prudence, indeed, will dictate
    • We value the ability of our political leaders to use good judgment to make wise decisions to promote the public interest.
  • Pledges and Promises
    • The solemn oath of the signers of the Declaration of Independence
    • Fifty-six men signed the Declaration and committed to the following pledge:
    • “ And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.”
  • Freedom and American Democracy: Universal Principles The Founding Fathers believed that fundamental principles of democracy and governance would not change over time. How does the Founders’ view differ from the ideas of moral relativism and cultural relativism ?
  • Freedom and American Democracy: Different Levels of Rights
    • What are the different levels of rights?
    • Natural rights
    • Civil rights
    • Political rights
  • Democracy and Freedom in the Modern World What are liberal democracies? What are some of the basic elements of liberal democracies?
  • Democracy and Freedom in the Modern World: Growth of Democratic Institutions With the end of the Cold War, liberal democracies increased around the world. From WWII to the end of the Cold War, there was a clash between liberal democracies and communist systems.
  • International Perspectives
    • Challenging repression in Burma
    • Burma has been accused of abusing rights of citizens (see page 21 for a complete list).
    • Aung San Suu Kyi has challenged the abuse and, in 1991, won the Nobel Peace Prize. However, she has been under house arrest or other restrictions since 1989.
  • Democracy and Freedom in the Modern World: Growth of Democratic Institutions A new emerging threat to liberal democracies around the world is terrorism committed by radical Islamic groups such as al Qaeda . Radical Islam and communist systems are examples of totalitarianism .
  • Democracy and Freedom in the Modern World: The Rule of Law In order to ensure that individual rights are protected, the principle of rule of law must be firmly rooted in liberal democracies. ThinkStock/SuperStock
  • Democracy and Freedom in the Modern World: Embracing New Goals Promoting social welfare has emerged as one of the important functions of modern American government. Do you believe that there are contro-versies over the role of government in promoting social welfare? What are some of those controversies?
  • Citizenship and Deliberative Democracy In order for a democracy to function well, citizens must be educated about their rights and responsibilities. The New York Public Library/Art Resource, NY
  • Summary
    • Americans seek to promote the “public interest” not just self-interest
    • One important purpose of government is to secure the rights of citizens
    • Educated citizens are necessary for a democracy