NIFLAR 3D world

896 views
787 views

Published on

NIFLAR 3D presentation 4 SLanguages 2010 Conference

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
896
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

NIFLAR 3D world

  1. 1. Social interaction through video- webcommunication and virtual worlds: Designing for ICC in 3D Ton Koenraad, Kristi Jauregi, Silvia Canto, Rick de Graaff, Utrecht University and partners
  2. 2. Structure • Background to NIFLAR • Design principles • NIFLAR 3D VLE’s Task and object driven activities • Reserach results on added value • Conclusions
  3. 3. Main NIFLAR objectives : • To enrich and innovate academic programs of foreign languages and make them more rewarding and relevant Promoting blended learning by the use of two technologies: – Video web communication (Adobe Connect) – 3D Virtual Worlds (Second Life / Open SIM) • To study the added value of implementing networked interactions Three target groups: – FL learners at secondary and tertiary levels – Pre- (in) service teachers
  4. 4. NIFLAR • Time span: 1 January 2009 – 31 December 2010 • Partners: Universities of – Utrecht in the Netherlands – Granada and Valencia in Spain – Coimbra in Portugal – Palacky in Olomouc the Czech Republic, – Nevsky and Novosibirsk in Russia – Concepción in Chile TELL Consult (Netherlands) Secondary schools, in Spain and The Netherlands Coordination: Utrecht University • Target languages: Dutch, Portuguese, Russian & Spanish
  5. 5. EU-Project ‘NIFLAR’ • Time span: 1 January 2009 – 31 December 2010 • Partners: Universities of: – Utrecht in the Netherlands – Granada and Valencia in Spain – Coimbra in Portugal – Palacky in Olomouc the Czech Republic, – Nevsky and Novosibirsk in Russia – Concepción in Chile TELL Consult (Netherlands) http://www.koenraad.info/tellconsult Secondary schools, in Spain and The Netherlands Coordination: Utrecht University http://www.uu.nl/faculty/humanities/EN/Pages/default.aspx Target languages: Dutch, Portuguese, Russian & Spanish
  6. 6. Adobe connect Second Life Open Sim
  7. 7. Pedagogical approaches Second Language Constructivism TELL Acquisition Task Based Language Teaching
  8. 8. Task design criteria for:
  9. 9. Example in Second Life:Task Task 2 People and adventures: -pre-task & task -NS & FLL Scenarios: -Participants meet at a restaurant and have to decide where to go to on holidays: winter/summer holidays. -Go to a hotel (reception/room) -- Depending on their choice go to the summer or winter slurl
  10. 10. Design principles for NIFLAR 3D-VLE • Objectives for (student) teachers + L2 learners • Pedagogical principles: – Pedagogy re ICC-training & assessment – Blended approach – Teacher Ed.: Experiential learning (competence development) • Analysis of good practice (Warburton, 2009; Molka- Danielsen & Deutchmann, 2009; Sweeney, 2009; Jauregi et al., 2009; 2010) • Scalable, sustainable
  11. 11. Open Simulator Platform VLE C O Reception / Exploratorium M P O N E N Simulation Space Game Space T S
  12. 12. Exploratorium for cultural info, encounters and events
  13. 13. Simulation Space for ICC-training & assessment
  14. 14. Game Space for cultural knowledge quests & games
  15. 15. NIFLAR @ Second Life Launchroom Virtlantis
  16. 16. NIFLAR @ Second Life Launchroom & Holodecked Tasks on Virtlantis
  17. 17. Task Example : Discovering Mexico
  18. 18. NIFLAR OS design process from first ideas to realisation
  19. 19. NIFLAR OS MegaSim: Four (4) voice-enabled Regions • Reception • Spanish SIM • Asterix Village + Projectlandia
  20. 20. NIFLAR OS MegaSIM: 4 regions
  21. 21. Reception SIM Project Home, International Meeting & Communication Area, Tandem Language Learning Space
  22. 22. Cartoon Puzzler Info Gap: collaborative problem solving
  23. 23. Talking Lottery Balls Inspired by: Talking Dice • oral proficiency practice with embedded ICC development goals through symbols & images that trigger statements and interactions on personal lives and cultural topics.
  24. 24. Cultural Knowledge Quiz: exchange, discuss, convince, move, apologize…
  25. 25. Asterix Village 3D-visualisation of Third Place concept and historical dimension (ICC pedagogy)
  26. 26. Asterix village: PUB + antique tourist artefacts
  27. 27. Asterix: Harbour & Campo Sportivo historical approach to folk/street games
  28. 28. Spain: Urban area (Valencia design by Nadia Revenga García)
  29. 29. NIFLAR Valencia city
  30. 30. Projectlandia: default scenario & facilities + ad hoc activities & projects (e.g. Adventures in 3D)
  31. 31. •Projectlandia: Regions for future target groups, e.g. ChinaVillage (holodeck approach)
  32. 32. Projectlandia: French Village
  33. 33. SLOODLE for NIFLAR OpenSim Worlds • WebIntercom -- links text-chat in-world to a Moodle chatroom • Quiz Chair -- students can do a Moodle quiz from in- world, and receive audio-visual feedback on their progress • CultureQuest • Awards system
  34. 34. Student involvement & CoP development • Ownership: student profiles / cultural knowledge sharing • Authorable content objects facilitating blended approach • Partner consortium • OS-LingoGrid
  35. 35. Experiences • Tasks for Dutch, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. • Several pilot experiences in video-web and Second Life, • Both with secondary and tertiary learners • Almost 400 students have participated in the experiences.
  36. 36. Research issues Is there any added value of implementing virtual interaction in language teaching curricula? 1. Students’ perceptions (evaluation of experiences) 2. Meaningfulness of interactions 3. Impact on motivation: Willingness to communicate (MacIntyre et al. 2001) • Perceived competence • Communication anxiety
  37. 37. Data sources • Recorded interactions • Pre & post oral tests • Surveys (pre, mid and post) • Interviews
  38. 38. Results participants’evaluation • Interactions with pre-service native teachers: - enhanced learning processes - contributed to: self-confidence, fluency, vocabulary, cultural awareness). • The environments: - effective for interaction - strong preference for VWC or SL above other SCMC tools (chat or audioconferencing). • Interactions: relevant & fun. • Tasks: motivating & useful.
  39. 39. Results: Positive impact on motivation Willingness to communicate (McIntyre et al, 2001) measured by repeated mid questionnaires; Comparisons between experimental and control groups reached significant values for: • perceived competence in the target language, • positive attitudes towards talking to native speakers, • and decrease of speaking anxiety.
  40. 40. Results: Significant impact on WTC 5 point Lykard scale Perceived competence Like speaking to native speakers 5 Competence 5 V V S V V S C VC V V S C C Average Answer Average Answer 4 4 S C VC SL S C C S V C VC SL C C C C C VC S C C SL VC VC VC SL 3 3 SL SL SL 2 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Week Week Get nervous talking in the TL 5 Average Answer 4 S S S V S V V V S 3 C C C V S C C C V C S V 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Week
  41. 41. Conclusions Pedagogy as the clue for the added value: • Adequate and balanced integration in the curriculum • Effective tasks that trigger meaningful interactions in virtual encounters taking into consideration – the learners’ their needs, styles, – the affordances of the environment, Synchronicity might turn out to be a problem: efficient organisation and good communication among partners is critical.
  42. 42. Would you like to know more about the NIFLAR project? Read about results in our publications & Join us at niflar.ning.com www.niflar.eu Thank you for your attention!!

×