RY 10 11 planning

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  • In 2009, the Board conducted an extensive review of the RI Strategic Plan. This review included surveying 14,000 Rotarians worldwide about the organization’s priorities, conducting focus groups to assess Rotary’s image in different countries, and analyzing other data and research. The revised plan, effective 1 July 2010, reflects the results of this research and also unifies the strategic direction of RI and The Rotary Foundation .
  • In 2009, the Board conducted an extensive review of the RI Strategic Plan. This review included surveying 14,000 Rotarians worldwide about the organization’s priorities, conducting focus groups to assess Rotary’s image in different countries, and analyzing other data and research. The revised plan, effective 1 July 2010, reflects the results of this research and also unifies the strategic direction of RI and The Rotary Foundation .
  • Core values  Rotary's core values represent the guiding principles of the organization's culture, including what guides members' priorities and actions within the organization. Values are an increasingly important component in strategic planning because they drive the intent and direction of the organization's leadership.Service We believe that our service activities and programs bring about greater world understanding and peace. Service is a major element of our mission. Through the plans and actions of individual clubs, we create a culture of service throughout our organization that provides unparalleled satisfaction for those who serve. Fellowship We believe that individual efforts focus on individual needs, but combined efforts serve humanity. The power of combined efforts knows no limitation, multiplies resources, and broadens our lives and perspectives. Fellowship leads to tolerance and transcends racial, national, and other boundaries. Diversity We believe Rotary unifies all people internationally behind the ideal of service. We encourage diversity of vocations within our membership and in our activities and service work. A club that reflects its business and professional community is a club with a key to its future. Integrity We are committed to and expect accountability from our leaders and fellow members, both in the results of our efforts and in the processes we use to accomplish our goals. We adhere to high ethical and professional standards in our work and personal relationships. We are fair and respectful in our interactions, and we conscientiously steward the resources entrusted to us. Leadership We are a global fellowship of individuals who are leaders in their fields of endeavor. We believe in the importance of leadership development and in leadership as a quality of our members. As Rotarians, we are leaders in implementing our core values. All of these core values are reflected in the Object of Rotary and The Four-Way Test, which we use in our daily lives. They inspire us to foster and support the ideal of service for developing and maintaining integrity in human relations.
  • R otary International’s programs and service opportunities, listed below, are designed to help Rotarians meet the needs of their own communities and assist people worldwide. Global Networking Groups encompass Rotary Fellowships (vocational and recreational interest groups) and Rotarian Action Groups (groups focused on service activities). The more than 90 Global Networking Groups are open to all Rotarians, spouses of Rotarians, and Rotaractors. Interact is a service organization organized and sponsored by Rotary clubs for youth ages 12-18. It has more than 12,300 clubs in 133 countries. Rotaractis organized by Rotary clubs to promote leadership, professional development, and service among young adults ages 18-30. There are more than 8,000 clubs in 167 countries. Rotary Community Corps (RCC) are groups of non-Rotarians who work to improve their communities. There are more than 6,800 RCCs in 78 countries, all organized and sponsored by Rotary clubs. Rotary Friendship Exchange encourages Rotarians and their families to make reciprocal visits to other countries, staying in each other’s homes and learning about different cultures firsthand. Rotary Volunteers allows Rotarians and other skilled professionals to offer their services and experience to local and international humanitarian projects. Rotary Youth Exchange offers students ages 15-19 the chance to travel abroad for cultural exchanges of one week to a full academic year. Rotary clubs and districts sponsor and host about 9,000 Youth Exchange students a year. Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) are seminars sponsored by clubs and districts to encourage and recognize the leadership abilities of youth and young adults ages 14-30. World Community Service (WCS) allows Rotary clubs and districts from at least two countries to implement community service projects together. The Rotary Foundation also offers several programs, such as PolioPlus.
  • R otary International’s programs and service opportunities, listed below, are designed to help Rotarians meet the needs of their own communities and assist people worldwide. Global Networking Groups encompass Rotary Fellowships (vocational and recreational interest groups) and Rotarian Action Groups (groups focused on service activities). The more than 90 Global Networking Groups are open to all Rotarians, spouses of Rotarians, and Rotaractors. Interact is a service organization organized and sponsored by Rotary clubs for youth ages 12-18. It has more than 12,300 clubs in 133 countries. Rotaractis organized by Rotary clubs to promote leadership, professional development, and service among young adults ages 18-30. There are more than 8,000 clubs in 167 countries. Rotary Community Corps (RCC) are groups of non-Rotarians who work to improve their communities. There are more than 6,800 RCCs in 78 countries, all organized and sponsored by Rotary clubs. Rotary Friendship Exchange encourages Rotarians and their families to make reciprocal visits to other countries, staying in each other’s homes and learning about different cultures firsthand. Rotary Volunteers allows Rotarians and other skilled professionals to offer their services and experience to local and international humanitarian projects. Rotary Youth Exchange offers students ages 15-19 the chance to travel abroad for cultural exchanges of one week to a full academic year. Rotary clubs and districts sponsor and host about 9,000 Youth Exchange students a year. Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) are seminars sponsored by clubs and districts to encourage and recognize the leadership abilities of youth and young adults ages 14-30. World Community Service (WCS) allows Rotary clubs and districts from at least two countries to implement community service projects together. The Rotary Foundation also offers several programs, such as PolioPlus.
  • T hrough Foundation grants and programs, Rotarians and other contributors can help change the world. They can finance a well for a village that lacks clean water, improve the environment, or provide scholarships to educate the next generation. The grants and programs available to Rotarians allow them to realize Rotary’s humanitarian mission throughout the world, including its number-one goal of eradicating polio. PolioPlusTo eradicate polio, Rotarians have mobilized by the hundreds of thousands. They’re working to ensure that children are immunized against this crippling disease and that surveillance is strong despite the poor infrastructure, extreme poverty, and civil strife of many countries. Since the PolioPlus program’s inception in 1985, more than two billion children have received the oral polio vaccine. Rotary's US$200 Million Challenge is the Rotary Foundation's response to the two grants totaling $355 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to help eradicate polio. Every dollar given to PolioPlus will be counted toward the $200 million match, which must be completed by 30 June 2012. Read more PolioPlus Grants – Primarily applied for by National PolioPlus Committee chairs or a major partner agency, such as the World Health Organization or UNICEF. Support is available for eradication efforts in polio-endemic, recently endemic, and high-risk countries, including National Immunization Days, poliovirus transmission monitoring, and other activities. Humanitarian Grants Program Disaster Recovery – Allows Rotarians to donate money in response to specific disasters. Funds are distributed to local committees to support recovery efforts. The program was created in 2005-06, and the Foundation currently administers four Disaster Recovery accounts: Hurricanes Stan and Wilma (Guatemala and Mexico), Hurricane Wilma (United States), the Earthquake in India and Pakistan, and Solidarity in South Asia. Total contributions to the accounts were $6.4 million. District Simplified Grants – Support the service activities of districts locally and abroad. Health, Hunger and Humanity (3-H) Grants – Fund large-scale, two- to four-year projects that improve health, alleviate hunger, or promote human development.  Matching Grants – Provide matching funds for the international service projects of Rotary clubs and districts.  For more information, download Rotary Foundation Facts. Also, read more about funding projects. Educational Programs Ambassadorial Scholarships – The Foundation sponsors one of the largest international scholarship programs in the world. Scholars study in a different country, where they serve as unofficial ambassadors of goodwill. Since 1947, more than 47,000 scholars from 110 countries have received scholarships of more than $476 million through The Rotary Foundation. Group Study Exchange (GSE) – Annual awards are made to paired Rotary districts to cover travel expenses for a team of non-Rotarians from a variety of professions. Rotarian hosts organize a four- to six-week itinerary of vocational, educational, and cultural points of interest. Since 1965, more than 57,000 individuals (almost 12,000 teams) from 100 countries have participated at a cost of more than $92 million.  Rotary Peace Fellowships – Each year, up to 110 scholars are sponsored to study at one of the seven Rotary Centers for International Studies in peace and conflict resolution for a master’s-level degree. Sign up  for the Peace Net  newsletter, which provides a forum for the Rotary Centers community. 
  • T hrough Foundation grants and programs, Rotarians and other contributors can help change the world. They can finance a well for a village that lacks clean water, improve the environment, or provide scholarships to educate the next generation. The grants and programs available to Rotarians allow them to realize Rotary’s humanitarian mission throughout the world, including its number-one goal of eradicating polio. PolioPlusTo eradicate polio, Rotarians have mobilized by the hundreds of thousands. They’re working to ensure that children are immunized against this crippling disease and that surveillance is strong despite the poor infrastructure, extreme poverty, and civil strife of many countries. Since the PolioPlus program’s inception in 1985, more than two billion children have received the oral polio vaccine. Rotary's US$200 Million Challenge is the Rotary Foundation's response to the two grants totaling $355 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to help eradicate polio. Every dollar given to PolioPlus will be counted toward the $200 million match, which must be completed by 30 June 2012. Read more PolioPlus Grants – Primarily applied for by National PolioPlus Committee chairs or a major partner agency, such as the World Health Organization or UNICEF. Support is available for eradication efforts in polio-endemic, recently endemic, and high-risk countries, including National Immunization Days, poliovirus transmission monitoring, and other activities. Humanitarian Grants Program Disaster Recovery – Allows Rotarians to donate money in response to specific disasters. Funds are distributed to local committees to support recovery efforts. The program was created in 2005-06, and the Foundation currently administers four Disaster Recovery accounts: Hurricanes Stan and Wilma (Guatemala and Mexico), Hurricane Wilma (United States), the Earthquake in India and Pakistan, and Solidarity in South Asia. Total contributions to the accounts were $6.4 million. District Simplified Grants – Support the service activities of districts locally and abroad. Health, Hunger and Humanity (3-H) Grants – Fund large-scale, two- to four-year projects that improve health, alleviate hunger, or promote human development.  Matching Grants – Provide matching funds for the international service projects of Rotary clubs and districts.  For more information, download Rotary Foundation Facts. Also, read more about funding projects. Educational Programs Ambassadorial Scholarships – The Foundation sponsors one of the largest international scholarship programs in the world. Scholars study in a different country, where they serve as unofficial ambassadors of goodwill. Since 1947, more than 47,000 scholars from 110 countries have received scholarships of more than $476 million through The Rotary Foundation. Group Study Exchange (GSE) – Annual awards are made to paired Rotary districts to cover travel expenses for a team of non-Rotarians from a variety of professions. Rotarian hosts organize a four- to six-week itinerary of vocational, educational, and cultural points of interest. Since 1965, more than 57,000 individuals (almost 12,000 teams) from 100 countries have participated at a cost of more than $92 million.  Rotary Peace Fellowships – Each year, up to 110 scholars are sponsored to study at one of the seven Rotary Centers for International Studies in peace and conflict resolution for a master’s-level degree. Sign up  for the Peace Net  newsletter, which provides a forum for the Rotary Centers community. 
  • Club pays RI dues on time (1st sem July; 2nd sem Jan)Club pays PRM/ Rotarian dues on time (1st sem July; 2nd sem Jan)Prompt submission of monthly reports to AG before the 5th of the succeeding monthInduction adjourns no more than 3 hours from stated time of start (evening: not later than 10:30 pm)Conduct/host/participate in Joint Club Meetings, 10 pts/mtgConduct/host/participate in Cluster Clubs' Meeting, 25 pts/mtg
  • Club pays RI dues on time (1st sem July; 2nd sem Jan)Club pays PRM/ Rotarian dues on time (1st sem July; 2nd sem Jan)Prompt submission of monthly reports to AG before the 5th of the succeeding monthInduction adjourns no more than 3 hours from stated time of start (evening: not later than 10:30 pm)Conduct/host/participate in Joint Club Meetings, 10 pts/mtgConduct/host/participate in Cluster Clubs' Meeting, 25 pts/mtg
  • RY 10 11 planning

    1. 1.
    2. 2.
    3. 3. Planning<br />Report Update to RCBSC <br />RY 2010 - 2011<br />
    4. 4.
    5. 5. Effective July 1, 2010<br />In 2009, the Board conducted an extensive review of the RI Strategic Plan. <br />Survey of 14,000 Rotarians worldwide <br />
    6. 6. Effective July 1, 2010<br />organization’s priorities, conducting focus groups to assess Rotary’s image in different countries, and analyzing other data and research. <br />The revised plan, effective 1 July 2010, reflects the results of this research and also unifies the strategic direction of RI and The Rotary Foundation . <br />
    7. 7. This is a changing world, and we must change with it. <br />Rotary founder Paul Harris<br />
    8. 8.
    9. 9. VISION<br />The service organization of choice with dynamic, action oriented clubs whose contributions improve lives in communities worldwide<br />MISSION<br />We provide service to others, promote integrity, & advance world understanding, goodwill, & peace through our fellowship of business, professional & community leaders<br />
    10. 10. SUPPORT & STRENGTHEN CLUBS<br />Foster club innovation & flexibility<br />Balance activities in all Four Avenues of Service<br />Promote membership diversity<br />Improve member recruitment & retention<br />Develop leaders<br />Extend rotary<br />Encourage strategic planning at club & district levels<br />
    11. 11. FOCUS & INCREASE HUMANITARIAN SERVICE<br />Eradicate polio<br />Increase sustainable service focused on:<br />Youth & young adult programs<br />The Rotary Foundation’s six areas of Focus<br />Expand strategic partnerships & cooperative relationships<br />Create significant projects both locally & internationally <br />
    12. 12. ENHANCE PUBLIC IMAGE & AWARENESS<br />Unify image & brand awareness<br />Publicize action – oriented service<br />Promote core values<br />Emphazise vocational service<br />Encourage to promote their networking oppurtunities & signature activities<br />
    13. 13.
    14. 14.
    15. 15. The programs of Rotary International <br />R otary International’s programs and service opportunities are designed to help Rotarians meet the needs of their own communities and assist people worldwide: <br />Global Networking Groups <br />Interact <br />Rotaract<br />Rotary Community Corps (RCC) <br />Rotary Friendship Exchange <br />
    16. 16. The programs of Rotary International <br />R otary International’s programs and service opportunities are designed to help Rotarians meet the needs of their own communities and assist people worldwide: <br />Rotary Volunteers <br />Rotary Youth Exchange <br />Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) <br />World Community Service (WCS)<br />
    17. 17. ProcessA strategic plan can be developed by completing the process below <br />1. Where are we now? <br />• Describe your club’s current state.<br />• Brainstorm your club’s strengths and weaknesses.<br />2. Where do we want to be? <br />• Create a list of 5-10 characteristics that you would like to see in your club three years from now.<br />• Draft a one-sentence vision statement describing your club three years from now.<br />• Finalize the vision statement, making sure that all participants support it.<br />
    18. 18. ProcessA strategic plan can be developed by completing the process below . <br />3. How do we get there? <br />Brainstorm three-year goals that will help your club achieve the vision, considering:<br />– Strengths and weaknesses of the club<br />– Programs and missions of RI and its Foundation<br />– Involvement of all members<br />– Achievability in three years<br />• Prioritize the three-year goals based on participant consensus. As a group, decide on the top two or three goals that will have the greatest impact as your club<br />works toward the vision <br />• Identify annual goals that support each of the top three-year goals.<br />• Determine the deadlines, resources, and people necessary for meeting the first annual goal for each of the three-year goals.<br />4. How are we doing? <br />• Create a strategic planning team to regularly monitor<br />progress and recommend revisions to the plan.<br />• Allocate sufficient resources for the plan’s<br />implementation.<br />• Evaluate all decisions to make sure they support the<br />plan, providing feedback to the strategic planning team<br />on their implementation.<br />• Review the strategic plan annually, including the vision<br />statement, three-year goals, and annual goals, and<br />revise as needed.<br />• Repeat the full strategic planning process every three<br />years to create a new plan or affirm the current one.<br />
    19. 19. Programs of The Rotary Foundation <br />PolioPlus<br />PolioPlus Grants <br />
    20. 20. Programs of The Rotary Foundation <br />Humanitarian Grants Program <br />Disaster Recovery <br />District Simplified Grants <br />Health, Hunger and Humanity (3-H) Grants <br />Matching Grants <br />Educational Programs <br />Ambassadorial Scholarships<br />Group Study Exchange (GSE) <br />Rotary Peace <br />
    21. 21. RCBSC<br />Club Administration<br />Club Membership<br />Public Relations<br />Rotary Foundation<br />Service Projects<br />
    22. 22. CLUB ADMINISTRATION <br />
    23. 23. CLUB ADMINISTRATION <br />CA100 Club has adopted a Club Leadership Plan (with corresponding club resolution and new by-laws) <br />CA200 Club has submitted Club Leadership Plans & Programs <br /> CA500 Club sends at least five (5) members to all DISTRICT EVENTS (50 points per district event) <br />CA600 Club develops a Club Historical record <br />CA700 1 NEW lifetime membership to PRM <br />CA800 100% member subscriber to the Philippine Rotary Magazine <br />CA900 100% of club members are lifetime subscriber to the PRM <br />CA1000 Club registers at least one member for 2011 RI Convention (Montreal) <br />CA1100 Attend the 2010 Zone Institute in Bangkok<br />CA1200 Club paid dues thru members access <br />CA1300 Club modified membership data thru members access <br />CA1400 President-Elect attends PETS and DISTAS<br />
    24. 24. CLUB ADMINISTRATION <br />CA1500 To have a qualified faculty member to the District Rotary Leadership Institute<br />CA1600 To able to partner with a foreign club during the Manila Zone Institute <br />CA1700 Club submits to district the complete weekly copies of club bulletins per month (10 points per month) <br />CA1800 Club hosts a District Function <br />CA1900 Prompt payment of Governor's fund and Disaster relief fund <br />GOVERNOR'S VISIT (Governor Graded)<br />CA3000 Part 1 (DG, AG, and President plus DS and Club Sec meeting)<br />CA3100 Part 2 (Presentation of Plans and Programs) <br />CA3200 Part 3 (Active participation of club officers and members in the Visioning Process) <br />(Governor Graded)<br />CA3300 Induction starts on stated invitation time <br />CA3400 Induction follows proper protocol <br />
    25. 25. CLUB MEMBERSHIP <br />
    26. 26. CLUB MEMBERSHIP <br />CM100 Increase Club’s net member by one Rotarian <br />CM200 Club less than 25 by SAR July 1 becomes 25 or more on April 15, 2011<br />CM300 Attains 10 % net increase in membership by April 15, 2010 (Clubs <35 July SAR) <br />CM400 Attains 20% or more net increase in membership by April 15, 2011 (Clubs <35 July SAR) <br />CM500 Attains 10 % net increase in membership by April 15, 2011 (Clubs >35 July SAR) <br />CM600 Attains 20% or more net increase in membership by April 15, 2011 (Clubs >35 July SAR) <br />CM700 Club President sponsors at least one new Rotarian 25 <br />CM800 Conduct New Member Orientation with every new candidate <br />CM900 Maintain club attendance at more than 90% (including make-ups) <br />CM1000 Maintain club attendance at 100% (including make-ups) <br />CM1100 Club able to retain 90% of its original members on April 15, 2011 based on July 2010 SAR <br />CM1200 Realize ZERO members' losses <br />
    27. 27. CLUB MEMBERSHIP <br />CM1300 Complete a Membership Survey for club <br />CM1400 Conduct/host/participate in Joint Club Induction <br />CM1500 Conduct/host/participate in Cluster Clubs' Induction <br />CM1800 Sponsor one or more new Club(s) in District <br />CM1900 To be able to establish NEW sisterhood agreement with one(1) major project with a local district club <br />CM2000 To be able to establish NEW sisterhood agreement with one(1) major project with a club in another district in the Philippines <br />CM2100 To be able to establish NEW sisterhood agreement with one(1) major project with a club in another country <br />CM2200 Project involving Rotary spouses and children <br />CM2300 Innovative/ Outstanding Membership Development Strategy/ Project Designed to increase membership/ Retention (Governor Approval Needed) <br />CM3000 Every 20% increase in membership beyond 20% of July SAR (Clubs <35 July SAR) <br />CM3100 Every 20% increase in membership beyond 20% of July SAR (Clubs >35 July SAR) <br />CM3200 Club Attends Induction of Other clubs in District (10 points per induction) <br />
    28. 28. PUBLIC RELATIONS <br />
    29. 29. PUBLIC RELATIONS <br />PR200 Club’s activities featured in local newspaper once per month <br />PR500 Club distributes GML/PRM/The Rotarians to workplaces, etc <br />PR600 Club publishes a Club newsletter weekly <br />PR700 Club participates in/hosts a radio or TV show related to Rotary <br />PR800 Club installs Four Way Test signage <br />PR900 Club installs significant road/building marker in meeting venue <br /> PR1100 Innovative Public Relation Activity (Governor Approval Needed) <br />
    30. 30. ROTARY FOUNDATION <br />
    31. 31. ROTARY FOUNDATION <br />RF100 Achieve Club’s RY 2010-2011 Annual Programs Fund Goal ($1,000 per club) <br />RF200 Club President contributes 1,000 Dollars to the Annual Giving Program 1 <br />RF300 Every 500 Dollars Contribution to the Annual Giving Program (200 points/ 500 Dollars) <br />RF400 Every $20 contribution to the End Polio Now campaign <br />RF500 To come up with a Fund raising activity in support of the End Polio Now Campaign <br />RF600 Every member Joining the Paul Harris Society <br />RF700 Submit a World Peace Scholar nominee for RY 2011-12<br />RF800 Submit a candidate for Ambassadorial Scholarship <br />RF900 Submit a candidate for GSE Team member <br />RF1000 Submit a candidate for GSE Team leader <br />RF1100 Host In-bound Group Study Exchange Team <br />
    32. 32. ROTARY FOUNDATION <br />RF1200 Participate in District’s Matching Grant project <br />RF1300 Implement at least one Matching Grant project <br />RF1400 Register project in RI project data base <br />RF1600 Implements a large scale project with international sister club (>200 beneficiaries) <br />RF1700 Approved (club sponsored) matching grant of less than $25,000 from TRF <br />RF1800 Approved (club sponsored) matching grant of more than $25,000 from TRF <br />RF1900 Approved (club sponsored) 3H grant from TRF <br />RF2000 Club Participates in Cluster Lead District Matching Grant <br />RF3000 Register 25% of Club’s members attends TRF Seminar <br />RF3100 Become a “Every Rotarian, Every Year” (EREY) Member Club <br />RF3200 Become a 100% Rotary Foundation Sustaining Member Club <br />RF3300 Club registers 1 Major Donor to TRF <br />
    33. 33. SERVICE PROJECTS <br />
    34. 34. SERVICE PROJECTS <br />SP100 Club to conduct a service project for Water <br />SP200 Club to conduct a service project for Health <br />SP300 Club to conduct a service project for Hunger <br />SP400 Club to conduct a service project for Literacy <br />SP500 Club to conduct a large scale service project for Water (Beneficiaries of >200) <br />SP600 Club to conduct a large scale service project for Health (Beneficiaries of >200 over 3 months or more) <br />SP700 Club to conduct a large scale service project for Hunger (Beneficiaries of >200 over 3 months or more) <br />SP800 Club to conduct a large scale service project for Literacy (Beneficiaries of >400) <br />SP900 Club to hold a major PR campaign to create Rotary awareness for potential Rotarians <br />SP1000 Club to conduct a 4 Way Test/ Ethics workshop. <br />
    35. 35. SERVICE PROJECTS <br />SP1200 To conduct a project to strengthen the Family of Rotary <br />SP1300 Maintains existing Rotary Community Corp <br />SP1400 Establish one new Rotary Community Corp <br /> SP1700 Maintains existing Interact Club <br />SP1800 Establish one new Interact Club <br />SP1900 Complete one project with Rotary Community Corp <br />SP2000 Support a Youth Mentorship project <br />
    36. 36. SERVICE PROJECTS <br />SP2100 Start or support a career counseling and development program in club <br />SP2200 Send 5 or more participants to the RYLA <br />SP2300 Club member participates in international Rotary Fellowship programs <br />SP2400 Club President speaks/ resource person in another Rotary club <br />SP2500 Career development seminar to High School Students <br />SP2600 For continuing an existing service project (at least 2 years excluding present year) <br />SP2700 Club participates in the Model United Nations Assembly (youth) <br />SP2800 Project sponsored or participated by club involving Street Children, abused or special children <br />SP2900 Club able to tap and implement a project through the RI WCS program <br />SP3000 Club Participates with other Clubs in Cluster Projects (All Clubs in Cluster must have participated) <br />SP3100 Other Significant/Innovative/Outstanding Projects (District Governor Approval needed) <br />
    37. 37. RCBSC RY 2010-2011 <br />COMMITTEES<br />Club Administration (dues, PRM, attendance to district functions) <br />Dir Peter Cating<br />Dir JorisDacawi<br />
    38. 38. RCBSC RY 2010-2011 <br />COMMITTEES<br />Club Membership (attendance, orientation of members, retention, sisterhood..)<br />Dir. Ed Mindaros<br />Dir. Raffy Lopez (Youth)<br />
    39. 39. RCBSC RY 2010-2011 <br />COMMITTEES<br />Public Relations<br />Wilson Manalo<br />
    40. 40. RCBSC RY 2010-2011 <br />COMMITTEES<br />Club Service Projects (RCC, Vocational, Rotaract/Interact, Water, health, hunger, literacy)<br />Dir. Joey Ancheta<br />Dir. Ed Dogui-is<br />
    41. 41. RCBSC RY 2010-2011 <br />COMMITTEES<br />TRF / INTERNATIONAL (GSE, Matching Grant, Nominees..)<br />Dir. Tony Tactay<br />Dir. Carlito Villanueva<br />
    42. 42. Planning<br />Report Update to RCBSC <br />RY 2010 - 2011<br />

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