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Monoculture Biodiversity
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Monoculture Biodiversity

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    Monoculture Biodiversity Monoculture Biodiversity Presentation Transcript

    • How can Malmö be more selfsufficient in the future? Where are the borders of Malmö’s food production area? Where are the limits for what Malmö can produce? How can a transition inthe way we farm increase the flexibility of Malmö and the Öresund region. A restructuring of the argricultural methods, and with that, the Skåne landscape, will change what we eat, wherewe buy what we eat and who works with food production. Tone Berge, kull 20 BAS, 031009
    • The facts on which these calculations are based: Population of Malmö: 286,535 people. The area of Malmö is 38,548 acres (156 km².) Population of Skåne: 1,184,500 people. The area of Skåne is 2,724,771 acres (11 027) km² source: www.wikipedia.se An average personal field in western agriculture: 1.2 acres. source: FOOD, LAND, POPULATION and the U.S. ECONOMY by David Pimentel of Cornell University and Mario Giampietro Istituto of Nazionale della Nutrizione, Rome A permacultural forest garden can feed 10 people on an area of only 2.1 acres. source: BBC documentary “A Farm for tje Future“, www.agroforestry.co.uk/ Arable land in Malmø is 13,032 acres. Arable land in Skåne is 1,123,618 acres. source: www.sjv.se, www.scb.se100% of the population eats.
    • n age nh pe Co ö alm MProduction area for the 100 Mile Diet of Copenhagen and Malmö
    • With traditional farming on Malmö’s arable land (33%), Malmö can produce food for 10860 people. That is 3,8% of the population.
    • With traditional farming on Skåne’s arable land, Skåne can produce food for 936348 people. That is 79% of the population in Skåne.
    • With a transition to permaculture Malmö can produce food for 62057 people. That is 22% of the population.
    • With a transition to permaculture Skåne can produce food for 5.350.561. That is 452% of the population in Skåne.
    • The area within the feeder road can hold a forest garden of 11.5 acres, which is enough to feed 54 people.
    • Tett inntil dagene (Close to the days) -Reading Malmö through the eyes of a migrated woman and her son. The novel “Tett inntil dagene“ Mustafa can has lent me an eye into the life of a Kurdish family who migrated to Sweden in the late 1970’s. Throug intimate conversations between Mustafa and his mother Güllü we get to learn about the situation of a migrated woman and her way of tackling life in a foreign country. Central topics in Mustafa’s story is the bad conciousness he has towards his mother because of the shame he has felt of her in his childhood. He has realized that he doesn’t really know who his mother is. The anxiety of losing her before he realizes himself is a pointer on the complexity of migration and resetteling as a topic. One of Mustafa’s confessions A tender scene Güllü sees in Mustafa describes to the reader In the conversations between The lie on which Mustafa’s fatherKeys to the novel to Güllü is how he felt the idea retrospect while lying sick at how he developes a parallell life Mustafa and Güllü we get to learn bases his whole existense in of inviting friends home rather home is the moment when she which he lives outside of his home how it feels to be an outsider Sweden on is the not unfulfilled, unpleasant. The physical carachter learn to write her own name. The i Skövde. The symbolically loaded in the Swedish society due to but in his mind delayed plan of the of their home was the source of act of signing a paper becomes Swedish everyday is something linguistic inabilities. Güllu tells return to Kurekava -their home concern: It was not the muddeled a powerful ritual to Güllü and it which his parents are unable to about how she was ashamed to village. The first one in the family exterior of the concrete blokcs, symbolizes a reclamation of power take part in. He also describes how meet Mustafa’s friends fearing that that returns to Kurekava is Güllü the grafitti or the cheap solutions to act within the new society. shame of his mother has led him she was not smart enouhg to be -post mortem. The truth about that caused the feelings, but to a neglection of any possibility of any interest to them. Mustafa their life in Sweden is written the looks of randomness and of her partaking in his adomestic says to her she is at least as wise in stone: The longer they stay temporality. life. In the case of Güllü the hinder as them, and by reading the book in Sweden the more Swedish is communication. In case of his we know why: Güllü is very well they get -and their ancestors are father it is about the lack of will to educated in low tech agricultural deprived of a cultural connection dive deep into the Swedish culture. methods. to Kurekava. The physical surroundings Many women are silent voices in The development of a parallell There is an immense source There is a tension betweenImbedded Information are equipped with imbedded a multicultural society. To educate society is not necessarily due to of hidden competence among generations concerning the claim information about the quality is one way of diminishing this a disgrace of the Swedish way of migrated women. Micro scale of cultural identity. This tension of life. It tells if homes are being segregational feature of migrant life. Lack of communicating tools agriculture, healthy nutrition has in some cases led to radical interpreted as setteled domain or societies. might be one reason, a desire to and holistic approaches towards practice of cultural expressions. just territory of passing by. These cling to what has been left might household are some of the Alternatively, and in this certain qualities regulates the expectations be another. knowledges. case, it means personal sorrows of participation either internal in and a local loss of opportunities in or external of the family. the abandoned land. Domestic Temporality Identity of Education Parallell Society Hidden Competence Price of Migration How will it actually effect Malmö to persue a forestgarden within the city?
    • I ha I have been pondering about Rosengård and how it is so easy for us to describe something unfamiliar as something homogenous when it is really not. Within Rosengård for example, 60% of the population is born abroad and 111 The blend of two structures and the rise of something new countries are represented. I wonder if it might benefit the prosess of discuss- ing Rosengård to see the phenomena rising there as something swedish rather than something foreign. Also, to distinguish between and accomodate for the differences within “easy- to-regard-as-but-not-really-homogenous” becomes rather meaningless: That would mean 111 categories. It might be more rational to consider the inhabit- ants in Rosengård as individuals rather than members of an ethnic minority? When discussing culture and ethnicity one can define culture as something that manifests ethnicity. And one can further divide between the cultural content of an ethnicity and the strategies for ethnic self-identification. A research carried out in Great Britain in 1997 shows how these two aspects were intimately con- nected among 1st generation immigrants, whereas in the second generation ethnicity had more importance as a symbol than anything else. In parcticality their cultural behaviour did not differ much from that of Britons of the same age. (Modood et al. (1997:337))Parallell societies The reading of Bateson has cast another light on this topic through his defini- tion of social ecology. He regards the development of subsystems within civili- sation as something that eats up flexibility and there for must be controlled. Malmö has now it’s bridge to Europe. How does the bridge from Rosengård Bridging program: A forestgar- Step one: Plant the climax for- Step two: Plant shrubs and to Malmö look? ve been pondering about Rosengård and how it is so easy for us to describe something unfamiliar as something homogenous when it is re- den producing food for the est and mulch with compost shade flowers near the base ally not. Within Rosengård for example, 60% of the population is born abroad school in Herrgården. to refertalize the soil. of the trees. and 111 countries are represented. I wonder if it might benefit the prosess of discussing Rosengård to see the phenomena rising there as something swedish rather than something foreign.The blend of two structures and the rise of something new Also, to distinguish between and accomodate for the differences within “easy- to-regard-as-but-not-really-homogenous” becomes rather meaningless: That would mean 111 categories. It might be more rational to consider the inhabit- ants in Rosengård as individuals rather than members of an ethnic minority? When discussing culture and ethnicity one can define culture as something that manifests ethnicity. And one can further divide between the cultural content of an ethnicity and the strategies for ethnic self-identification. A research carried out in Great Britain in 1997 shows how these two aspects were intimately con- nected among 1st generation immigrants, whereas in the second generation ethnicity had more importance as a symbol than anything else. In parcticality their cultural behaviour did not differ much from that of Britons of the same age. (Modood et al. (1997:337)) The reading of Bateson has cast another light on this topic through his defini- tion of social ecology. He regards the development of subsystems within civili- Step three: Plant fruit bear- Step four: Plant groundcovers, Step five: Plant flowers that sation as something that eats up flexibility and there for must be controlled. Malmö has now it’s bridge to Europe. How does the bridge from Rosengård ing vines near the trees and e.g. Comfrey and Dandelions. will attract butterflies and to Malmö look? shrubs. This is repeated through fertilizers. several stages.
    • The public must not just be informed Rosengårdsskolan has 350 students in F-5 and about a farming transition, but also be 300 students and staff in 6-9. The staff counts 180 included in it. Citizens must be edu- people. cated about food choises, gardening opportunities and ways to access food 20 nationalities are represented and the 30 lan- from local producers. guages are spoken. The largest lingustic groups are arabic, arabiska, kurdiska, somaliska, pashto och A nine minute walk when there’s a romanese. source: www.malmo.se Herrgården lot to take interest in. Average calory needed per day for a grown up i 2245 calories. A three minute walk For children 7-10 years it is an average of 1855 in an empty street calories per day. For children 11-14 it is an average of 2030 calories per day. source: http://www.weightlossresources. co.uk 3 1 Let’s say that one third of the nutri- 2 tion need should be covered in the gar- den around the school. (350*1850/3) + (300*2030/3)+(180*2245/3) = 215833 cal + 20300 cal + 134700 cal = 553553 cal per day. This is how big the Let us say that a forest garden produces 2245 100 meter schoolgarden needs to be calories per 0.21 acres per day. This means that in order to give one meal to the school garden needs to be 553553cal/2245 every student ever day. 25 cal *0.21 acres = 51 acres to supply lunch for the times 2.1 acre. school. This is if we count that the students are at1 Rosengårdsskolan school every day. That is not the case: They are at school 200 days each year. This means the garden2 Rosengårdsskolan is required to be 51acres*200days/365days = 27 acres.3 Rosengårds Herrgård
    • 100 meterWithin these rules for placingthe garden surface this areawas left: Excisting programsare being respected andeach block is left with onefree side.
    • composting market place composting forest garden new use of the the school plays a recreational area education centre park central roleDomestic Temporality Identity of Education Hidden Competence Parallell Society