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Power For Social Change
 

Power For Social Change

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Tom Tresser presented this webinar on December 13, 2012 for the National Network of Statewide Afterschool Networks, http://www.statewideafterschoolnetworks.net. Contact Tom = tom@tresser.com, ...

Tom Tresser presented this webinar on December 13, 2012 for the National Network of Statewide Afterschool Networks, http://www.statewideafterschoolnetworks.net. Contact Tom = tom@tresser.com, www.tresser.com, @tomstee

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    Power For Social Change Power For Social Change Presentation Transcript

    • “Power For Social Change”November 13, 2012 Webinar
    • Tom’s background… ACTOR PRODUCER EXEC ED COMMUNITY DEVELOPER DESIGNER/ FACILITATOR EDUCATOR “The Artist As Activist” – DePaul Art DepartmentINTERNET MARKETER
    • Recent Civic Projects www.nogameschicago.com www.publicassets.us www.civiclab.us
    • Agenda• The Big Picture• Organizing 101• Stories About Power• Building Infrastructure• Expand Your Vision, Get Busy• Who’s Ready? What’s Next? > Q&A via email = tom@tresser.com> Twitter: #nppower> http://afterschooladvocacy.wikispaces.com
    • THE BIG PICTURE
    • Challenge to the field• Isn’t time to get out from BEHIND the elephants?• Isn’t it time to SET the agenda and not REACT to the agenda?
    • ORGANIZING 101
    • INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY ORGANIZING “The whole history of the progress of human liberty shows that all concessions yet made to her august claims have been born of struggle…Those who profess to favor freedom, and yet depreciate agitation, are men who want crops without plowing up the ground. They want rain without thunder and lightning…Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will. Find out what the people will submit to, and you have found the exact amount of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them; and these will continue until they are resisted with either words or blows, or with both. The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress.” - Frederick Douglass, Letter to an abolitionist associate, 1849
    • FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING – TYPES OF HELPING ORGANIZATIONS Direct Service Self Help Education Advocacy Direct Action Source: Midwest Academy
    • FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING – TYPES OF HELPING ORGANIZATIONS Direct Service United Ways mission is to improve lives by mobilizing caring people to invest in the community where their resources are needed most. Source: Midwest Academy
    • FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING – TYPES OF HELPING ORGANIZATIONS Self HelpAlcoholics Anonymous is a voluntary, worldwide fellowship of menand women from all walks of life who meet together to attain andmaintain sobriety. The only requirement for membership is a desire tostop drinking. There are no dues or fees for A.A. membership. Source: Midwest Academy
    • FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING – TYPES OF HELPING ORGANIZATIONS Education Source: Midwest Academy
    • FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING – TYPES OF HELPING ORGANIZATIONS AdvocacyThe mission of the ACLU is to preserve these protections and guarantees:Your First Amendment rights-freedom of speech, association and assembly.Freedom of the press, and freedom of religion supported by the strictseparation of church and state.Your right to equal protection under the law - equal treatment regardless ofrace, sex, religion or national origin.Your right to due process - fair treatment by the government whenever theloss of your liberty or property is at stake. Source: Midwest AcademyYour right to privacy - freedom from unwarranted government intrusion intoyour personal and private affairs.
    • FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING – TYPES OF HELPING ORGANIZATIONS Direct ActionNational Peoples Action (NPA) is a network of grassroots organizations with a fiercereputation for direct action from across the country that work to advance a nationaleconomic and racial justice agenda. NPA has over 200 organizers working to uniteeveryday people in cities, towns, and rural communities throughout the United Statesthrough direct-action, house meetings and community organizing.NPA and its affiliates range from farmers in rural Iowa to youth in the South Bronx.We have affiliate organizations in 14 states with remote network offices inWashington D.C., California, New York and a central office in Chicago. Our targetpopulation is not limited to a geographical area or regional group but rather workswith and on behalf of hard working Americans everywhere to ensure an equitable andjust democracy.
    • THREE PRINCIPLES OF DIRECT ACTION ORGANIZING1. Win real, immediate, concrete improvements in people’s live2. Give people a sense of their own power3. Alter the relationships of power Source: Midwest Academy
    • FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING Accepts Challenges Existing Existing Power PowerRelationships Relationships Direct Service Direct Action Education Advocacy Self Help Source: Midwest Academy
    • FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING Accepts Challenges Existing Existing Power PowerRelationships Relationships Level of involvement of people directly affected by problem Direct Service Direct Action Education Advocacy Self Help Source: Midwest Academy
    • FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING Accepts Challenges Existing Existing Power PowerRelationships Relationships Change of people involved in problem Direct Service Direct Action Education Advocacy Self Help Source: Midwest Academy
    • FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING Accepts Challenges Existing Existing Power PowerRelationships Relationships Level of structural change Direct Service Direct Action Education Advocacy Self Help Source: Midwest Academy
    • FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING Accepts Challenges Existing Existing Power PowerRelationships Relationships Level of Conflict Direct Service Direct Action Education Advocacy Self Help Source: Midwest Academy
    • Saul Alinsky (1909 – 1972)• Pioneer in grassrootsdemocracy theory andpractice• Founder of the IndustrialAreas Foundation (IAF)• Master organizer andchallenger of the status quo www.industrialareasfoundation.org
    • “Change means movement.Movement means friction. Only in thefrictionless vacuum of a nonexistent abstract world can movement or change occur without that abrasive friction of conflict.” - Saul Alinsky
    • Challenge to the field• Being right means NOTHING.• What is your POWER analysis for getting your agenda accomplished?
    • A POWERFUL ORGANIZATION
    • 2010 revenue =$227,811,279
    • • 4.3 million members, mostly gun owners.• Grassroots connections with extensive membership, NRA affiliated stateassociations, local gun clubs, the Boy Scouts and other organizations•. When restrictive gun legislation is proposed at any level, NRA members andsupporters are alerted and respond with individual letters, faxes, emails, and callsto their representatives.• Several websites and seven monthly publications for subscribers andnewsstands to get its message out.• 2010 revenues = $227,811,279• Federal level lobbying = between $1.5 million and $2.7 million from 2001 - 2010.• During 2010, they spent over $7.2 million at the federal level.• 2010 federal congressional elections = NRA contributed $902,700 to Republicancandidates and $373,350 to Democrats.• Some statistics show that the NRA and its allies outspend gun control groups by27 to 1.• Members of Congress have ranked it as the most powerful lobbyingorganization in the country several years in a row.• Seven permanent lobbyists in DC.• 200 pro-gun members of Congress.• NRA particularly effective in influencing swing voters.
    • “During my career as a trauma surgeon at CookCounty hospital, we saw a lot of gun violencevictims. I became an advocate for gun control,even being invited to give testimony before thesenate subcommittee concerning the assaultweapon ban. At every turn the NRA was there. Itis an extremely powerful, well organized machine,that just bulldozes over its enemies.”- Former student in Tom’s “Public Policy” class
    • POLITICIANS HAVE A REPTILIAN BRAIN…
    • Challenge to the field• Do NRA members care more for the Second Amendment and their guns than do the leaders of America’s nonprofit sector care for social justice and their constituents?
    • A STORY OF INFRASTRUCTURE
    • 2011 revenue = $9,168,949
    • LI programs trains thousands of people each year to:• Form independent conservative student groups• Manage grassroots-oriented campaigns• Publish independent conservative school newspaper• Succeed in the competitive field of broadcast media• Run successfully for elected office• Communicate a conservative message using the media• Formulate policy as elected officials or key staff membersOffers 40 types of training schools, workshops, and seminarsand a top-notch intern program.
    • Since 1979, the Leadership Institute has trained more than100,000 students. Graduates include US Senators andCongressmen, governors and state legislators, city councilmembers and local mayors, and conservative activists andofficeholders at every level. The Institutes unique collegecampus network has grown to more than 1,400 conservativecampus groups and newspapers.
    • Challenge to the field• What does OUR Leadership Institute look like?• Would YOU sign up?
    • IT’S TIME FOR US TO BE DIFFERENT!
    • Operation 2014 – Seek out, train, support50 nonprofit leaders to run for local officeas champions of a Human Agenda.
    • Donna Edwards was elected in 2008 as a Democrat to represent Maryland’s fourth district inthe House of Representatives. Most of her previous experience was in the nonprofitworld, including jobs as:• Lobbyist, Public Citizen’s Congress Watch project, 1992-94• Executive director, Center for a New Democracy, 1994-96• Co-founder and executive director, National Network to End Domestic Violence, 1996-99• Executive director, Arca Foundation, 2000-8
    • Ms. Edwards says she loved working for nonprofits but appreciates “the power of the voice and the office” that she now enjoys as a lawmaker. “Being a member of Congress is like a big bully pulpit for the things you feel passionate about,” she says, recalling that two decades ago she worked with a group that was pushing to overhaul the health-care system. “Then I get to come to Congress,” she adds, “and I preside over the health-care debate and [help] pass what is probably the most significant legislation we’re going to have in a generation that’s really going to make a difference in people’s lives.”Watch video @ http://afterschooladvocacy.wikispaces.com/Background
    • 312-804-3230tom@tresser.com - @tomsteewww.tresser.comwww.civiclab.us