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Nonprofit Marketing101
 

Nonprofit Marketing101

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Introduction to marketing nonprofit organizations from the Arts & Business Council of Chicago.

Introduction to marketing nonprofit organizations from the Arts & Business Council of Chicago.

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  • Tonight we’ll be talking a lot about topics that will help you to begin to address this from a marketing framework.
  • We’re not going to spend a lot of time on this tonight . . .I would venture to say you all have very strong visions for your organization, that is why you are here tonight, to learn how to take that vision to market. Anyone here feel that your organization needs work on your vision?
  • Let’s start our work tonight by beginning a list of your key constituencies – write on flip chart
  • Now, that is a mission. You don't need to wordsmith it. You can say it a hundred different ways, but the goal doesn't change: to the moon and back by the end of the decade. Period. And, most important, it did what a mission should do: It broke the country's lethargy and got people moving forward with excitement, vigor and renewed spirit. Like the moon flight, a good mission has a clear finish line -- you should be able to tell when you've done it -- at which point, you need to create a new mission. And, like the moon flight, a good mission is risky, falling in a gray zone where reason says, "This is unreasonable"; and your intuition and drive say, "But we believe we can do it anyway."
  • How long has your mission been in place? How was it developed?
  • This is a great example of how a mission and the institution’s business goals were in conflict. The audience that really cares about sustaining the environment, is, sadly enough, very small. It is hardly large enough to drive enough dollars to feed the animals, not to even mention running the park. The audience we needed to attract, which would support the business and financial goals, was a bit more general . . . Those who enjoy nature, perhaps they were looking for a bit of entertainment, or simply a nice day out . . And may not even care about the environment.
  • Ask Audience to articulate their mission Ask Panelists to articulate their mission
  • Tonight’s workshop doesn’t allow us to go into depth in all these components. We are going to focus on: I’m going to pick the more strategic elements that will help get you started.
  • People – key constituents, target audience
  • In class assignment: Develop your organization’s positioning
  • In class assignment: Develop your organization’s positioning
  • Discuss for each
  • Discuss for each
  • Why segment the market? “ Segmentation is saying something to somebody instead of saying nothing to everybody .”
  • Why segment the market? “ Segmentation is saying something to somebody instead of saying nothing to everybody .”
  • In class assignment: Develop your organization’s positioning
  • In class assignment: Develop your organization’s positioning
  • In class assignment: Develop your organization’s positioning

Nonprofit Marketing101 Nonprofit Marketing101 Presentation Transcript

  • Marketing 101 Sponsored by:
  • What is marketing?
    • Marketing is the process by which you come to understand the relationship between your product and your customer.
    • Source: http://www.artsmarketing.org
  • What is marketing?
    • Starts with the recognition of customer needs
    • Connecting what you have to offer with people who want/need/value your offering
    • Focus is on building long term relationships
    • The link between your organization and the marketplace
  • Where do you begin?
    • With a clear understanding of:
    • Who you are and what you have to offer
    • Who your customers are and what they need, want, value
  • Ingredients for success
    • 1. Clarify Vision/Mission
    • What is it that you want to communicate?
    • 2. Identify Target Market/Audience
    • Who do you want to reach?
    • 3. Specify Marketing Goals
    • What results do you want to end up with?
    • 4. Prioritize Ways to Implement Goals and Set Budget
    • How will you get the word out and what will it cost?
    • 5. Create Action Plan to Achieve your Goals How to accomplish goals? And who? And when?
  • Vision
    • Clarify Your Vision/Mission
    • "Vision is a love affair with an idea."
    • Source: The Leader’s Voice , Clarke and Crossland
  • Mission
    • Clarify Your Vision/Mission
    • A true mission is a clear and compelling goal that focuses people's efforts. It is tangible, specific, crisp, clear and engaging. It reaches out and grabs people in the gut.
  • Mission
    • Clarify Your Vision/Mission
    • Passion that drives the service
    • Why we exist
    • Purpose and values
    • Includes your key constituencies
  • Examples of mission statements "This nation should dedicate itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to Earth."
  • Examples of mission statements Zephyr Dance is committed to making dance accessible to diverse audiences, and to the advancement of women and girls in pursuit of creative endeavors.
  • Examples of mission statements
    • The mission of Brookfield Zoo is to help people develop a sustainable and harmonious relationship with nature.
    • www.brookfieldzoo.org
  • Test of a good mission statement Can everyone on your board and staff articulate the organization’s mission and its activities?
  • The Marketing Planning Process
    • Establishing Objectives
      • Financials, forecast, budgets
    • Selecting the Target Market
      • Customer needs, market size, growth profile
    • Marketing Mix
      • Product, place, price, promotion, positioning
    • Implementation & Control
    • Measure Results
      • Market research
  • The Marketing Planning Process
    • A successful plan must be:
    • Simple, easy to understand and communicate
    • Clear, precise and detailed
    • Practical, realistic in its application and goal attainment
    • Flexible, adjusting to changing conditions
    • Complete, covering all significant marketing factors
    • Workable, identifying responsibilities
  • Marketing Plan Components
    • Objectives
    • Strategies
    • Tactics
    • Budget
    • Timeline
  • Marketing Objectives
    • Reasonable – based on the realities of the market and capabilities of the firm
    • Obtainable – within reach of the company given its resources and personnel
    • Measurable – yielding results that can be measured against projections or some accepted company yardstick
  • Marketing Strategies & Tactics
    • Strategies:
    • How you plan to accomplish your objectives
    • Determine the overall design or program for achieving goals
    • Tactics:
    • The “stuff” you will do - posters, press releases, newspaper ads, etc.
  • Marketing Mix
    • Product
    • Place
    • Price
    • Promotion
    • People
    • Promotion
  • Marketing Strategy Defining who you are – Positioning
  • Marketing Strategy: Defining who you are - Positioning
    • Understanding where a brand sits in the mind of the consumer.
    • It is the relationship which the consumer forms with the product, even though it may be functionally based, will include powerful emotional ties; together these help to transform a product into a brand.
  • Marketing Strategy: Defining who you are - Positioning
    • Jack Trout's "five basic principles of the mind," from The New Positioning :
    • Minds are limited. Even a little information is too much.
    • Minds hate confusion. The only solution to over-communication is over-simplification.
    • Minds are insecure. They're emotional, not rational.
    • Minds don't change. A made-up mind is a closed mind.
    • Minds lose focus. Don't expect one to understand why your department store also sells insurance.
  • Marketing Strategy: Defining who you are - Positioning
    • The key to positioning, Trout says, is:
    • owning one word in your
    • customer's mind .
  • Marketing Strategy: Defining who you are - Positioning
    • For example:
    • Fedex owns
    • the " overnight ," position
    • Crest owns
    • the " cavities " position
    • Volvo owns
    • the " safety " position
    • even if you never buy these products.
  • Marketing Strategy: Defining who you are - Positioning
    • Distinctive positioning
      • Target audience
      • Frame of reference/competitive set
      • Point of difference/what’s unique about you?
  • Marketing Strategy: Defining who you are - Positioning What is: The product? Benefits? Reasons to believe? Personality? One word = Small group work - answer the questions
  • Marketing Strategy: Defining who you are - Positioning
    • Distinctive positioning
      • Target audience
      • Frame of reference/competitive set
      • Point of difference/what’s unique about you?
  • Identify Your Target Market
    • Who is your audience?
    • Who do you want to reach?
    • Are they the same as your “customer”?
  • Identify Your Target Market
    • Who is my audience/are my customers?
    • How many live in a market?
    • Where can I find them?
  • Target market
    • How can you define your audience/target market?
      • Demographics (age, income, gender, geography)
      • Life-stage (young, old, cohort – veteran, boomer, gen x, gen y)
      • Wants, needs, desires, attitudes, interests (dance enthusiasts)
      • Barriers, concerns, pressures
  • Target market
    • How could your offering benefit them? Solve a problem?
    • What is your image with them?
    • How do you reach them?
    • How can you segment?
  • Marketing Strategy: Defining who you are - Positioning
    • Distinctive positioning
      • Target audience
      • Frame of reference/competitive set
      • Point of difference/what’s unique about you?
  • Competition
    • Competition – compare to other groups or activities
  • Competition
    • Who are your competitors?
    • What are their strengths? Weaknesses?
    • How do you compare? Contrast?
    • Have you considered other kinds of competition?
  • Marketing Strategy: Defining who you are - Positioning
    • Distinctive positioning
      • Target audience
      • Frame of reference/competitive set
      • Point of difference/what’s unique about you?
  • Marketing Strategy: Defining who you are - Positioning
    • Distinctive positioning
      • Target audience
      • Frame of reference/competitive set
      • Point of difference/what’s unique about you?
      • PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER
  • Marketing Strategy: Defining who you are - Positioning
    • To ________ (target audience) xyz (your company) is the ___________ (frame of reference) that ________ (point of difference/what is compelling/unique about you?)
    • To music enthusiasts, Bella Voce is the premier choral chamber group that provides a wide-ranging repertoire including a cappella literature of the mid- and late-twentieth century, works commissioned from American composers, and sacred music of the Renaissance and Baroque eras.
  • Branding
  • Strong brands
    • Brand is the relationship you have with your customers, and
    • It’s the relationship your audience has with your organization, and your productions
    • Emerges from the experience they have
  • Importance of Brand
    • Makes you unique and different
    • Represents a trusted promise, encapsulates a big idea
    • Distinguishes your organization from its competitors in the eyes of the customers.
    • Repetition implants the purchase idea in the unconscious mind where purchase decisions are made.
  • Strong Brands
    • Are unique and visible. They catch the eye and stays in the customer's memory.
    • Can be emotional or image-driven (Club Med transports me to a fantasy place) or factual (Kraft Macaroni & Cheese is the cheesiest)
    • Source: www.artsmarketing.org
  • Strong brands
  • Developing Strong Brands
    • Consistency in communication
    • Positive experience
    • Relevant to your audience
    • Delight your customer!
  • Ingredients for success
    • 1. Clarify Vision/Mission
    • What is it that you want to communicate?
    • 2. Identify Target Market/Audience
    • Who do you want to reach?
    • 3. Specify Marketing Goals
    • What results do you want to end up with? What is your brand ID?
    • 4. Prioritize Ways to Implement Goals and Set Budget
    • How will you get the word out and what will it cost?
    • 5. Create Action Plan to Achieve your Goals How to accomplish goals? And who? And when?
  • Contacts
    • Arts & Business Council of Chicago
    • [email_address]
    • Websites
    • www.artsmarketing.org
    • www.artsbiz-chicago.org