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USMC Aviation Plans for 2012 and beyond

USMC Aviation Plans for 2012 and beyond

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    Marine aviation plan fy2012 marine aviation_plan1 Marine aviation plan fy2012 marine aviation_plan1 Presentation Transcript

    • FY2012 Marine Aviation Plan 1 LtGen Terry G. Robling Deputy Commandant for Aviation December 2011
    • A LEGACY OF VALOR“It is perhaps well to discuss the impact of the air support that the Marine and Army units received at the Chosin Reservoir.The Marine Corps’ uniqueness as a fighting unit is that, among other things, it comes with its own integrated air support.The relationship between the Marine on the ground and the Marine in the air was unique at the time. The Marines’ closeair support of the troops on the ground functioned well, because each battalion-sized unit on the ground had a tactical aircontrol party, one of whom was always a pilot. Major General O.P. Smith, First Marine Division commander, commented inhis oral history, “When a request went up to the air for support, those people up there knew that some aviator down on theground had checked that over and they were not going to have to do something impossible. Those poor aviators in thefrontline battalions, they really took a beating; they were right up there.”As dawn came on 29 November 1950, it meant not only that the First Marine Division was still holding, but it also meant theresumption of the air support that was so necessary, not only to the Marines’ survival but also to the Army troops east ofthe reservoir as well.Major General Smith later wrote in a letter to Major General Field Harris, commander of the First Marine Aircraft Wing:“Without your support our task would have been infinitely more difficult and more costly. During the long reaches of thenight and in the snowstorms, many a Marine prayed for the coming of day or clearing weather, when he knew he wouldagain hear the welcome roar of your planes as they dealt out destruction to the enemy.Never in its history has Marine Aviation given more convincing proof of its indispensable value to the ground marines. Abond of understanding has been established that will never be broken.” Gail Shisler For Country and Corps 2009
    • The Osprey has already done three deployments to Iraq; is on its fourth to Afghanistan; and is on its fourth aboard ship with a Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU). This aircraft is so quiet and so fast, and flies so high and far, that it is not just changing aviation tactics… it is changing infantry tactics, as ground commanders realize the speed, shock, surprise, and battlefield flexibility they have with this capability. In the same way the Osprey revolutionizes assault support, the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) will revolutionize tactical air support of ground forces. The Marine Corps is going to buy 420 of these aircraft, both the B (short takeoff / verticalAs it has been for the 100 years since our founding, Marine landing) and C (carrier) variants. The JSF will fly from L-classaviation’s number one priority is to support the ground force ships as well as from the aircraft carrier, and will operatein winning our nation’s wars. The current war in Afghanistan from austere sites or 3,000-foot runways or mattingis today’s reality: our air-ground force is fighting more than anywhere in the world. The JSF will lead the way ashore,400 nautical miles from the sea. Over the past 20 years, disabling information nodes and grids and providing thethough, American amphibious forces have responded to rest of the air-ground task force awareness of what they willcrises and contingencies more than 100 times — a response face. The JSF will then serve as a bomb carrier and close airrate more than double that of the Cold War, with most of support (CAS) platform, supporting Marines and soldiers upthese contingencies in the littorals. We know that we will close and personal with the enemy.range across the spectrum of military operations in the nextcampaign, and we will do this with new systems and new Our unmanned aerial vehicle squadrons have performedcapabilities which maintain and strengthen our fundamental magnificently during the past decade’s combat operationsnaval character. in Iraq and Afghanistan. We are employing the RQ-7B Shadow unmanned aircraft system (UAS) for intelligence,The MV-22B Osprey is the evolution of rotary lift and the surveillance, and reconnaissance and for battlefieldvanguard of assault support capability, and right now it is our management, and we are looking to weaponize the RQ-7Bdisruptive technology advantage. At our current rate of and our future UAS. We also are pursuing cargo UAS and aproduction and replacement of CH-46 squadrons, we are high-flying, long duration Group 4 UAS to replace the RQ-well on the way to our planned total of 360 of these new 7B. Our new Small Tactical UAS program of record is also onaircraft. solid ground, with the RQ-21 Integrator soon coming online.
    • Our helicopter force, too, is moving into the future. The CAS capability to the MAGTF to add to the aircraft’sCH-53K heavy lift helicopter will be a new build, not a traditional aerial refueling and lift role. This transitionrebuild of our current airframes. This is the helicopter from the T model allows the warfighter to exploit fullythat will lift the Marine Corps middleweight force: it the agility and rugged nature of this uniquewill be the only shipboard-compatible helicopter that multimission assault support platform.can lift 100 percent of the Marine Corps vertical liftequipment from amphibious shipping to inland To control all of this hardware, our command andobjectives under high altitude and hot atmospheric control units will be organized, trained, and equippedconditions such as those found in Afghanistan. The CH- to deploy and employ open architecture systems, net-53K will transport 27,000 pounds of external cargo out centric multifunctional agencies, and new facilities.to a range of 110 nautical miles, nearly tripling our Our aviation ground support remains our expeditionaryworkhorse CH-53Es lift capability while fitting into the enabler: the ability to sustain ourselves anywhere insame shipboard footprint. the world sets us apart, and those logistics, such as putting down airfields in the open desert, make us theWe have new utility and attack H-1s out in the nation’s force in readiness. It is logistics which makesoperating forces, replacing the Huey and the Cobra. us expeditionary.These new helicopters add lift, range, speed, durability,weaponry and critical tactical flexibility to the Power projection from the sea is fundamental to ouramphibious task force and to the Marine Air-Ground identity, and the aircraft we fly today and those we willTask Force ( MAGTF) ashore. The UH-1Y “Yankee” has fly tomorrow in support of our ground forces are navaldeployed aboard ship and demonstrated its superior aircraft first. We cannot predict the time or place forlift and range, and the AH-1Z “Zulu” is developing the next war, but we can prepare and train for it.swiftly and smoothly into what will be the worlds When the nation calls, your Marine Corps aviationdominant attack helicopter. This November we force will be ready.deployed the first "all-upgrades MEU," with the Y and Zmodels deploying at sea together for the first time. Semper Fidelis,We also have now fielded the new KC-130J Herculesthroughout the active force, and we will start soon on Terry G. Roblingour reserve squadrons. Using the Harvest HAWKmission kit, this new Hercules can even provide a new
    • TABLE OF CONTENTSSection 1 --- Marine Aviation Organizational StructureSection 2 --- Marine Rotary-Wing / Tiltrotor Aviation PlanSection 3 --- Marine Fixed-Wing and Tactical Aviation PlanSection 4 --- Marine Reserve Aviation PlanSection 5 --- Marine Air Command & Control System PlanSection 6 --- Marine Unmanned Aircraft System PlanSection 7 --- Marine Aviation Weapons and Munitions PlanSection 8 --- Aircraft Survivability Equipment PlanSection 9 --- Tactical Air Control Party PlanSection 10 --- Aviation Readiness and SafetySection 11 --- Aviation ManpowerSection 12 --- Aviation Science & Technology PlanSection 13 --- Aviation Training SystemSection 14 --- Marine Aviation Logistics PlanSection 15 --- Marine Aviation Ground Support PlanSection 16 --- Marine Corps Air Station Facilities Upgrade/MILCON PlanSection 17 --- Platform Quick Reference “Quad” Charts
    • SECTION 1 --- MARINE AVIATION ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE2012 Marine Aviation Plan 1-2FY12 MARFORPAC/1st MAW Organizational Chart 1-3FY12 Marine Corps Installations Pacific Organizational Chart 1-4FY12 MARFORPAC/3d MAW Organizational Chart 1-5FY12 Marine Corps Installations West Organizational Chart 1-6Marine Aviation in the Pacific 1-7FY12 MARFORCOM/2d MAW Organizational Chart 1-9FY12 Marine Corps Installations East Organizational Chart 1-10Aviation-Unique Organizational Charts 1-11Headquarters Marine Corps Aviation Organizational Chart 1-12Marine Aviation Transition Task Force (TTF) Organizational Chart 1-13Marine Aviation Type Model Series (TMS) Lead Organizational Chart 1-14 1-1
    • FY2012 MARINE AVIATION PLANThe FY 2012 Marine Aviation Plan (AvPlan) supports the force structureinitiatives approved under the Marine Aviation Transition Strategy (MATS) andthe anticipated requirements resulting from the implementation of theDefense Policy Review Initiative (DPRI). DPRI is the series of sustained securityconsultations between the U.S. and the Government of Japan which resultedin several agreements related to the restructuring / rebasing of forces in thePacific.The combination of these initiatives will continue to shape the future of Current Structure Planned Cadre Planned RelocationMarine Corps aviation we adjust to meet the diverse missions of today’s andtomorrow’s battlefields. The AvPlan provides a systematic method to Planned Cadre orintroduce new aircraft and improved capabilities, and to shape the future Deactivation Deactivation Planned Structureorganization of Marine Corps aviation, all while maintaining our currentcapability as our nation’s force in readiness. This plan sets in place Planned USN Structure (#) reflectstomorrow’s Marine aviation as a viable and essential component in support of Redesignation note at bottomthe MAGTF on the battlefield. Planned BasingThe AvPlan is designed to improve the posture of Marine Corps aviation in thenear term and to continue modernizing as we move to the future.Way Ahead: Color-code and numbering convention used in theDuring the next decade, Marine aviation will transition from 13 to 6 organizational chartstype/model/series manned aircraft. These are manpower- and training-intensive transitions which will take units temporarily out of the operatingforce.The AvPlan delineates the latest plans for these transitioning aviation *Note:platforms and programs, and Marine aviation continues to work with theMarine Forces (MarFors), Marine Expeditionary Forces (MEFs) and Marine Fiscal realities and subsequent budgetary changes willAircraft Wings (MAWs) to optimize these transitions and minimize impact to necessitate changes in the Marine Corps in the comingthe operating forces. years. This AvPlan is the ten-year vision for Marine Corps aviation using today’s force structure and program plans.Pages 1-3 through 1-14 are FY12 Marine aviation organizational charts that Marine Corps aviation will publish an update as required.show planned changes in structure and basing, and command and unitpositions, only in the years 2011 and 2012. 1-2
    • FY12 MARFORPAC/1st MAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART MARFORPAC CAMP SMITH III MEF CAMP COURTNEY 1st MAW CAMP FOSTER MWHS-1 MAG-12 MAG-36 MAG-24 MACG-18 IWAKUNI FUTENMA MCAF K-BAY FUTENMA (RJOI) (ROTM) (PHNG) (ROTM) MALS-12 MALS-36 MALS-24 (-) MTACS-18 VMFA(AW)-242 HMM-262 HMH-362 MACS-4 VMFA(AW)/VMFA (1) HMM-265 (5) HMH-363 (7) ATC DET (RJOI) VMM -265 (5) HMH-463 (8) VMFA(AW)/VMFA/VFA (2) ATC DET HMH (-) (6) MWSD-24 (9) VMAQ/VAQ (3) TAOC DET VMA (-) (4) HMLA (-) (6) MASS-2 MWSS-171 VMGR-152 MWCS-18 MWSS-172NOTES:1) UDP SQUADRON SOURCED FROM 2d/3d MAW.2) UDP SQUADRON SOURCED FROM 2d/3d MAW (STRIKE FIGHTER WING PACIFIC CEASES SUPPORT TO UDP IN 2012).3) UDP SQUADRON SOURCED THROUGH GFMP (USMC/USN SQUADRON).4) UDP SQUADRON (-) ISO 31ST MEU SOURCED FROM 2d/3d MAW.5) HMM-265 WILL REDESIGNATE AS VMM-265 AND RECEIVE AIRCRAFT AND PERSONNEL FROM VMM-561. BASING OF MV-22 IN OKINAWA IS SUBJECT TO ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW.6) UDP SQUADRON TYPICALLY SOURCED FROM 3d MAW, BUT 2d MAW CAN ALSO SOURCE.7) HMH-363 WILL RELOCATE TO MAG-16 TO ENTER THE MV-22 TRANSITION DURING 3RD QTR FY12.8) HMH-463 TRANSITIONS FROM CH-53D TO CH-53E DURING FY12 AND WILL BE THE LAST CH-53E SQUADRON TO TRANSITION TO CH-53K.9) IOC IS 2ND QTR FY12 AND FOC IS 2ND QTR FY13. 1-3
    • FY12 MARINE CORPS INSTALLATIONS PACIFIC ORGANIZATIONAL CHART MC INSTALLATIONS COMMAND HQMC I&L MC INSTALLATIONS PACIFIC MCB CAMP BUTLER MCAS MCB MCAS FUTENMA MCAS IWAKUNI MCB KANEOHE BAY CAMP MUJUK CAMP FUJI CAMP BUTLER (ROTM) (RJOI) HAWAII (PHNG) H&HS (1) H&HS (2) 1 x C-20G 1 x UC-12 2 x UC-12 3 x UC-35NOTES:1) H&HS MCAS FUTENMA OPERATES 1 X UC-12W EQUIPPED WITH EXTENDED RANGE TANKS.2) H&HS MCAS IWAKUNI OPERATES 1 X UC-12W NOT EQUIPPED WITH EXTENDED RANGE TANKS AND 1 X UC-12W EQUIPPED WITH EXTENDED RANGE TANKS. 1-4
    • FY12 MARFORPAC/3d MAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART MARFORPAC CAMP SMITH I MEF CAMP PENDLETON 3d MAW MIRAMAR MWHS-3 MAG-11 MAG-39 MAG-16 MAG-13 MACG-38 MIRAMAR PENDLETON MIRAMAR YUMA MIRAMAR (NKX) (NFG) (NKX) (NYL) (1) (NKX) MALS-11 MALS-39 MALS-16 MALS-13 MTACS-38 VMFAT-101 HMLAT-303 VMM-161 VMA-211 MACS-1 (NYL) VMM-163 VMFA-232 HMLA-169 VMA-214 ATC DET (NFG) VMM-165 VMFA-314 HMLA-267 VMA-311 ATC DET VMM-166 VMFA-323 HMLA-367 VMA-513 ATC DET (NYL) HMH-361 VMFA(AW)-121 HMLA-369 VMM-363 (2) ATC DET (NYL) VMFA-332 (4) VMFA(AW)-225 HMLA-469 VMM-561 (3) TAOC DET (NYL) MWSS-371 VMGR-352 HMM-268 HMH-462 EWC DET HMH-465 MASS-3 (NFG) MWSS-373 HMM-364 HMH-466 MWCS-38 HMMT-164 MWSS-374 (NXP) MWSS-372 3d LAAD BN (NFG) VMU-1 (NXP) VMU-3 (NXP)NOTES:1) MAG-13 TRANSITION TO JSF BEGINS IN FY12.2) HMH-363 WILL RELOCATE TO MAG-16, REDESIGNATE AS VMM-363, AND ENTER THE MV-22 TRANSITION DURING 3RD QTR FY12.3) VMM-561 WILL DEACTIVATE AT THE END OF FY12.4) VMFA-332 CADRED IN FY07 UNDER MAG-31. RETURNED IN FY11 WITH JSF IN TRANSITION UNDER MAG-13. 1-5
    • FY12 MARINE CORPS INSTALLATIONS WEST ORGANIZATIONAL CHART MC INSTALLATIONS COMMAND HQMC I&L MC INSTALLATIONS WEST MCB CAMP PENDLETON MCAS MCAS MCB MCAS YUMA MCLB CAMP PENDLETON MIRAMAR CAMP PENDLETON (NYL) BARSTOW, CA (NFG) (NKX) H&HS H&HS (1) H&HS (2) 1 x UC-12 2 x UC-12 2 x UC-35 3 x HH-1NNOTES:1) H&HS MCAS MIRAMAR OPERATES 1 X UC-12W, NOT EQUIPPED WITH EXTENDED RANGE TANKS.2) H&HS MCAS YUMA OPERATES UC-12F AIRCRAFT. HH-1N ARE SAR AIRCRAFT, AND WILL BE TRANSITIONED TO THE UH-1Y IN FY14. 1-6
    • MARINE AVIATION IN THE PACIFICAs stated in the 21 June 2011, Security Consultative Committee (SCC) document, Progress on the Realignment of U.S. Forces inJapan, the U.S. government is committed to implement steadily the realignment initiatives described in the 1 May 1 2006 SCCdocument, United States-Japan Roadmap for Realignment Implementation. The bilateral realignment initiatives and additionalservice requirements result in changes to Marine aviation laydown in the Pacific that will be realized over the next twentyyears.Present Marine aviation Pacific laydown:Currently, Marine aviation in the Pacific primarily resides in three locations: 1) Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Kaneohe Bay,HI; 2) MCAS Iwakuni, Japan; and 3) MCAS Futenma, Okinawa, Japan with 1st Marine Aircraft Wing and other headquarters atCamp Foster, Okinawa, Japan. Other Marine aviation presence in the Pacific is realized through Marine Expeditionary Unit(MEU) Aviation Combat Element (ACE) deployments of the 11th, 13th, 15th , and 31st MEUs.Changes as a result of the 2006 “Roadmap” realignment initiatives:The agreements resulting from the 2006 realignment initiatives will affect Marine aviation directly or indirectly. The mostnotable agreements involve the relocation of aircraft and personnel from MCAS Futenma to the Futenma Replacement Facility(FRF) and MCAS Iwakuni; relocation of aviation units from Okinawa and MCAS Iwakuni to Guam; and relocation of U.S. Navyaircraft and personnel from Naval Air Facility (NAF) Atsugi to MCAS Iwakuni. These initiatives require Master Planning effortsthat include base design or redesign as well as construction at the following locations: Camp Schwab, MCAS Iwakuni, andAndersen Air Force Base (Guam).Changes as a result of USMC service requirements:The modernization of Marine aircraft and enabling systems, as presented throughout the AvPlan, will result in improvedcapabilities and additional employment options for the Pacific Command (PACOM) commander. Legacy aircraft are beingreplaced by new aircraft and as a result will arrive to the bases throughout the Pacific and strengthen the capabilities of theU.S.-Japan alliance. In addition to the modernization of Marine aircraft and enabling systems, service decisions on basinglocations of Marine aviation assets will result in enhanced support to the Marine Air Ground Task Force (MAGTF). 1-7
    • MARINE AVIATION IN THE PACIFICMarine aviation in the Pacific: FY12 through FY21A combination of implementing the bilateral realignment initiatives and service requirements will result in a Marine aviationlaydown in the Pacific that will see the introduction of new aircraft to existing bases while the infrastructure, facilities, and trainingcapabilities are being developed to support the realignment of forces. A number of variables can affect the actual arrival of a unitor aircraft, however, the following changes to Marine aviation in the Pacific are expected to occur in the next ten years:• MCAS Kaneohe Bay – UH-1Y arrives, MV-22 replaces CH-53D, AH-1W arrives and is replaced by the AH-1Z, CH-53E replaces CH-53D, MWSD-24 Det is activated, and VMU-3 relocates from 29 Palms.• MCAS Iwakuni – VMGR-152 relocates from MCAS Futenma, F-35B replaces F/A-18 and AV-8, Navy Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5)relocates fixed-wing aircraft and supporting personnel from NAF Atsugi.• MCAS Futenma – MV-22 replaces CH-46, UH-1Y replaces UH-1N, VMGR-152 relocates to MCAS Iwakuni, AH-1Z replaces AH-1W.• 11th, 13th, 15th , and 31st MEUs– ACE deploys with MV-22, AH-1Z, UH-1Y, CH-53E, and F-35B aircraft.Marine aviation in the Pacific: FY-22 through FY31Due to the variability associated with political considerations, environmental impacts, design and construction timelines, andfunding requirements, it is anticipated that it could take at least ten years to complete the required projects that support therealignment initiatives. In addition to those changes listed above, the following changes to Marine aviation in the Pacific areexpected to occur over the next twenty years:• MCAS Kaneohe Bay – CH-53K replaces the CH-53E.• FRF – MAG-36 and supporting air station units relocate from MCAS Futenma.• Andersen Air Force Base – Marine ACE operates from the North Ramp at Andersen Air Base. Guam ACE consists of a VMM,HMH Det, HMLA Det, and supporting enablers.• 11th, 13th, 15th , and 31st MEUs– ACE deploys with MV-22, AH-1Z, UH-1Y, CH-53K, and F-35B aircraft.NOTE: U.S. global defense posture is constantly being assessed. Future Marine aviation laydown in the Pacific is subject to furtherreview and may result in a different laydown than what has been presented. 1-8
    • FY12 MARFORCOM/2d MAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART COMMARFORCOM NORFOLK II MEF CAMP LEJEUNE 2d MAW MWHS-2 CHERRY POINT MAG-14 MAG-29 MAG-26 MAG-31 MACG-28CHERRY POINT NEW RIVER NEW RIVER BEAUFORT CHERRY POINT (NKT) (NCA) (NCA) (NBC) (NKT) MALS-14 MALS-29 MALS-26 MALS-31 MTACS-28 VMAQ-1 HMHT-302 VMMT-204 VMFA-115 MACS-2 VMAQ-2 VMM-162 VMFA-122 ATC DET (NCA) HMH-366 (NKT) VMAQ-3 VMM-261 ATC DET (NBC) HMH-461 VMFA-251 VMAQ-4 ATC DET (NJM) HMH-464 VMM-263 VMFA-312 ATC DET (NKT) VMAT-203 HMLA-167 VMM-264 VMFA(AW)-224 TAOC DET VMA-223 HMLA-269 VMM-266 VMFA(AW)-533 EWC DET (NBC) VMA-231 HMLA-467 (NKT) VMM-365 MWSS-273 MASS-1 VMA-542 MWSS-274 MWSS-272 MWCS-28 VMGR-252 2d LAAD BN MWSS-271 VMU-2 1-9
    • FY12 MARINE CORPS INSTALLATIONS EAST ORGANIZATIONAL CHART MC INSTALLATIONS COMMAND HQMC I&L MC INSTALLATIONS EAST MCB CAMP LEJEUNE MCAS MCAS MCAS MCAF MCLB MCB QUANTICO MCB CHERRY POINT BEAUFORT NEW RIVER QUANTICO ALBANY CAMP LEJEUNE (NKT) (1) (NBC) (NCA) (NYG) H&HS H&HS (3) H&HS (4) H&HS VMR-1 2 x UC-12 2 x UC-12 2xC9 2 x UC-35 3 x HH-46 (2)NOTES:1) VMR-1 IS AN ACTIVE DUTY SQUADRON ASSIGNED TO MCI EAST STATIONED AT MCAS CHERRY POINT.2) H&HS MCAS CHERRY POINT SAR TRANSITION FROM HH-46 TO UH-1Y IN CALENDAR YEAR 2017.3) H&HS MCAS BEAUFORT 2 X UC-12M.4) H&HS MCAS NEW RIVER 2 X UC-12F. 1-10
    • AVIATION-UNIQUE ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTS MARINE AVIATION WEAPONS AND TACTICS SQUADRON ONE MARINE HELICOPTER SQUADRON ONE MCCDC MCB QUANTICO WHITE HOUSE COMOPTEVFOR MILITARY PAX RIVER (4) OFFICE (3) TECOM MCB QUANTICO MAGTF TC 29 PALMS DCA (2) HMX-1 MC INSTALLATIONS MAWTS-1 WEST YUMA MCAS YUMA (1) MARINE TILTROTOR TEST AND EVALUATION SQUADRON TWENTY-TWO COMOPTEVFOR NORFOLK (4) VMX-22 VMX DET (JSF) DCA (2) NEW RIVER EDWARDS AFB (5) (Pending) (6) (7)NOTES:1) FISCAL/COMPTROLLER SUPPORT.2) ADCON.3) OPCON FOR PRESIDENTIAL MISSIONS.4) OPCON FOR OPERATIONAL TEST MISSIONS.5) VMX-22 TO RE-LOCATE TO MCAS YUMA IN 2015.6) VMX-22 DETACHMENT (JSF) STANDUP JANUARY 2012.7) VMX DET (JSF) RE-LOCATES TO MCAS YUMA AT COMPLETION OF JSF SYSTEM DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT (SDD) IN 2015 (EST). 1-11
    • HEADQUARTERS MARINE CORPS AVIATION ORGANIZATIONAL CHART Commandant DCA ADCA ADCA (SES) PLANS AND PROGRAMS READINESS (1) APP APW ASL ASM APX AAB ORDNANCE COMMAND PROGRAMS & AVIATION ADMINISTRATIVE TACAIR & FUNCTIONS BUDGET MANPOWER CONTROL AVIATION AVIATIONCURRENT PLANS & ASSAULT SUPPLY HQMC ASCO GROUND SECURITY POLICY SUPPORT SUPPORT AVIATION FUTURE PLANS, SYSTEMS INTEGRATION MAINTENANCE AIRCREW UNMANNED TRANSITIONS & AND PROGRAMS AIRCRAFT DOCTRINE INTEROPERABILITY SYSTEMS AVIONICS CENTENNIAL OF AVIATION STRATEGIC NAVAL AVIATION COMMAND COMM FACILITIES STRATEGICCONGRESSIONAL PLANS NOTES: 1) ADCA, READINESS (SES BILLET) APPROVED AND IN PROCESS TO FILL AVNLOG INFO SYS NAE 1-12
    • MARINE AVIATION TRANSITION TASK FORCE (TTF) ORGANIZATIONAL CHART DCA ADCA APW ASM APX MV-22 JSF Coordination H-1 Coordination Aviation Coordination Cell Cell Cell C2 TTF ESC Marine Air Command OSA TTF ESC TTF MISSION STATEMENT: and Control System TTFs WILL DEVELOP TRANSITION PLANS TO IMPLEMENT CHANGES Experimental UAS TTF ESC TO THE DOTMLPF AREAS ASSOCIATED WITH THE FIELDING OF THE (MACCS-X) VXX TTF ESC NEXT GENERATION OF AIRCRAFT/SYSTEMS FOR THE MAGTF (AS REQUIRED) . KC-130J TTF ESC CH-53K TTF ESC ATS TTF ESC CFT I CFT II CFT IIIDOCTRINE & ORGANIZATION MATERIAL & TRAINING & PERSONNEL FACILITIES (APP) (ASM) (ASL) 1-13
    • MARINE AVIATION TYPE MODEL SERIES (TMS) LEAD ORGANIZATIONAL CHART DCA ADCAMAG-11 MAG-13 MAG-14 MAG-24 MAG-26 MAG-29 MAG-31 MACG-38 MAG-39 MAG-41KC-130J AV-8B EA-6B CH-53D MV-22 CH-53E FA-18 UAS H-1 KC-130T 1-14
    • SECTION 2 --- MARINE ROTARY-WING / TILTROTOR AVIATION PLANMarine Rotary-Wing / Tiltrotor Plan 2-2Marine Medium Helicopter / Tiltrotor (HMM/VMM) Plan 2-5Marine Heavy Helicopter (HMH) Plan 2-8Marine Light Attack Helicopter (HMLA) Plan 2-11Marine Helicopter Squadron One (HMX-1) Plan 2-14Marine Search and Rescue (SAR) Plan 2-15 2-1
    • MARINE ROTARY-WING / TILTROTOR PLANMissions New Aircraft Test and Evaluation UpdatesMARINE MEDIUM HELICOPTER SQUADRON (HMM): Support the MAGTF MV-22:commander by providing assault support transport of combat troops, supplies DEVELOPMENTAL TEST: Ongoing DT efforts include those for fleetand equipment, day or night under all weather conditions during sustainment, new capabilities, and envelope expansion for high altitudeexpeditionary, joint or combined operations. and defensive maneuvering.MARINE MEDIUM HELICOPTER TRAINING SQUADRON (HMMT): Conduct MV-22 OPERATIONAL TEST AND EVALUATION:. Ongoing OT effortscombat capable assault support medium lift helicopter training for selected include support of integrated test for software development, fireaircrews in the CH-46E aircraft and provide technical training for aviation bucket certification, as well as Hostile Fire Indicator and Blue Forcemaintenance personnel. Tracker techniques and procedures (TTP) development.MARINE MEDIUM TILTROTOR SQUADRON (VMM): Support the MAGTF VXX:commander by providing assault support transport of combat troops, supplies The VXX program entered the JCIDS process with the Initial Capabilitiesand equipment, day or night under all weather conditions during Document (ICD) approved in FY09. The program has completed theexpeditionary, joint or combined operations. Analysis of Alternatives phase and a Draft Capabilities Development Document (CDD) has been produced to support a Milestone ‘A’MARINE MEDIUM TILTROTOR TRAINING SQUADRON (VMMT) Conduct decision in FY12.combat capable assault support tiltrotor training for selected aircrew in theMV-22B and provide technical training for aviation maintenance personnel. UH-1Y: DEVELOPMENTAL TEST: Complete.MARINE HEAVY HELICOPTER SQUADRON (HMH): Support the MAGTF OPERATIONAL TEST/OPEVAL: Complete.commander by providing assault support transport of heavy equipment,combat troops, and supplies, day or night under all weather conditions during INITIAL OPERATIONAL CAPABILITY: Was achieved on 8 August 2008expeditionary, joint or combined operations. when HMLA-267 received a three- aircraft UH-1Y detachment. First deployment was with 13th MEU in January 2009. Second deployment with full complement of UH-1Y completed in May 2010 with HMLA-367MARINE HEAVY HELICOPTER TRAINING SQUADRON (HMHT): Conduct combat supporting International Security Assistance Forces – Afghanistan.capable assault support heavy lift helicopter training for selected aircrews inthe CH-53E aircraft, with further transition to the D model provided aftergraduation, and provide technical training for aviation maintenance personnel. AH-1Z: DEVELOPMENTAL TEST: Complete.MARINE LIGHT ATTACK HELICOPTER SQUADRON (HMLA): OPERATIONAL TEST/OPEVAL: Complete.Support the MAGTF commander by providing offensive air support, utility INITIAL OPERATIONAL CAPABILITY: Was achieved 24 February 2011support, armed escort and airborne supporting arms coordination, day or night when HMLA-367 received a six-aircraft AH-1Z detachment withunder all weather conditions during expeditionary, joint or combined required support equipment, technical publications, trainedoperations. maintenance personnel and trained aircrew, to include initial spares with interim repair support in place and is capable of deploying for operational commitments.MARINE LIGHT ATTACK HELICOPTER TRAINING SQUADRON (HMLAT) :Conduct combat capable attack training for selected aircrews in the UH-1N,UH-1Y, AH-1W and AH-1Z aircraft, and provide technical training for aviationmaintenance personnel. 2-2
    • MARINE ROTARY-WING / TILTROTOR PLANNew Aircraft Test and Evaluation Updates ContinuedCH-53K:DEVELOPMENTAL TEST: 1st Qtr FY13 to 3rd Qtr FY19OPERATIONAL TEST/OPEVAL: OT-B1 testing in support of Milestone C Decisionbegins 4th Qtr FY15. OT-C testing in support of Initial Operational Capability(IOC) / Full Rate Production (FRP) begins 1st Qtr FY17.INITIAL OPERATIONAL CAPABILITY: Will be achieved CY18 when the first HMHreceives a four-aircraft CH-53K detachment with required support equipment,technical publications, trained maintenance personnel and trained aircrew, toinclude initial spares with interim repair support in place and is capable ofdeploying for operational commitments. * Format for Notes in AvPlanAC: Active componentRC: Reserve componentFRS: Fleet Replacement SquadronData shows squadrons on 30 September of that FY. Numbers are presented with total squadrons first, followed by number of aircraft in each squadron. For example,“6-12” means six squadrons of twelve aircraft apiece. Thus, in the chart on page 2-5, “RC CH-46E PMAI FY12 2-12” means that the reserve component of Marineaviation in fiscal year 2012 will have, per its aircraft assigned for its wartime mission, two squadrons with twelve CH-46E aircraft apiece.FRS aircraft are training assets, and are categorized as PTAI, while operational squadron aircraft are categorized as PMAI per the chart on next page. 2-3
    • INVENTORY TERMINOLOGY AND BREAKDOWN 2-4
    • MARINE MEDIUM HELICOPTER / TILTROTOR (HMM/VMM) PLAN FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21TOTAL SQUADRONS-UNIT PMAI (OR PTAI)AC CH-46E 6-12 4-12 3-12 2-12 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0AC MV-22 10-12 12-12 13-12 14-12 16-12 16-12 16-12 16-12 16-12 16-12 16-12RC CH-46E 2-12 2-12 1-12 1-12 1-12 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0RC MV-22 0-0 0-0 1-12 1-12 1-12 2-12 2-12 2-12 2-12 2-12 2-12CH-46E FRS 1-12 1-12 1-12 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0MV-22A FRS 1-20 1-20 1-20 1-20 1-20 1-20 1-20 1-20 1-20 1-20 1-20 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21PAI PLANAC/RC PMAICH-46E 96 72 48 36 12 0 0 0 0 0 0MV-22B 120 144 168 180 204 216 216 216 216 216 216TOTAL PMAI 216 216 216 216 216 216 216 216 216 216 216FRS PTAICH-46E 12 12 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0MV-22B 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20TOTAL FRS PTAI 32 32 32 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20TOTAL PMAI/PTAI 248 248 248 236 236 236 236 236 236 236 236 2-5
    • MV-22 TRANSITION TIMELINE CURRENT FORCE: FORCE GOAL FY20: 8 VMM SQUADRONS ESTABLISHED 16 AC VMM SQDN x 12 MV-22B FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 3 VMM SQUADRONS IN TRANSITION 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 FRS SQDN x 20 MV-22B 4 AC SQDN x 12 CH-46E UNIT/LOCATION PMAI 2 RC VMM SQDN x 12 MV-22B MAG-26/29 2 RC SQDN x 12 CH-46E VMMT-204 20 MV-22 1 FRS x 12 CH-46E VMM-263 12 MV-22 VMM-162 12 MV-22 1 FRS x 20 MV-22B VMM-266 12 MV-22 VMM-261 12 MV-22 VMM-365 12 MV-22 VMM-264 12 MV-22 MAG-16 VMM-161 12 MV-22 V VMM-166 12 MV-22 V VMM-561 12 MV-22 M V NOTE 1 VMM-165 12 MV-22 M V VMM-163 12 CH-46E M V HMH-363 (2) 10 CH-53D M V NOTE 2 HMM-164 M V NOTE 3 MAG-36 HMM-265 12 CH-46E V NOTE 4 HMM-262 12 CH-46E V NOTE 5 MAG-41 HMM-764 12 CH-46E M NOTE 6 V MAG-39 HMMT-164 12 CH-46E NOTE 3 HMM-364 12 CH-46E M V HMM-268 12 CH-46E M V MAG-24 VMM-363 NOTE 2 VMM-164 NOTE 3 MAG-49 HMM-774 12 CH-46E M V GUAM NOTE 7 WHMO HMX-1 12 CH-46E M VM - MV-22 TRANSITION BEGINSV - MV-22 SQUADRON FULLY OPERATIONAL CAPABLE (FOC) / ENTERS PTP PHASENOTES:1) NLT END OF FY12 VMM-561 WILL DELIVER AIRCRAFT AND PERSONNEL TO VMM-265 ON OKINAWA AND THEN DEACTIVATE.2) HMH-363 TRANSITION BEGINS DURING 3RD QTR FY12 WITH TRANSFER FROM MAG-24 TO MAG-16. DURING 4TH QTR FY13 SQUADRON TO FLOW PERSONNEL AND AIRCRAFT TOMAG-36 TO FACILITATE IMMEDIATE TRANSITION OF VMM-262. SQUADRON TO RETURN TO MAG-24 DURING 4TH QTR FY15 AS VMM-363.3) HMM-164 TRANSITION BEGINS DURING 3RD QTR FY14 WITH TRANSFER FROM MAG-39 TO MAG-16. SQUADRON TO TRANSFER TO MAG-24 DURING 4TH QTR FY16 AS VMM-164.4) HMM-265 TO REDESIGNATE AS VMM-265 AND RECEIVE AIRCRAFT AND PERSONNEL FROM VMM-561 TO SUPPORT IMMEDIATE TRANSITION.5) HMM-262 TO REDESIGNATE AS VMM-262 AND RECEIVE AIRCRAFT AND PERSONNEL FROM VMM-363 TO SUPPORT IMMEDIATE TRANSITION.6) HMM-764 TRANSITION BEGINS DURING 3RD QTR FY13 WITH MOVE TO MCAS MIRAMAR.7) GUAM TO BE SOURCED WITH CONUS BASED UDP SQUADRON. GUAM ACE SUBJECT TO ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS AND THE CONDITIONS IDENTIFIED BETWEEN THE U.S. GOVERNMENT AND THE GOVERNMENT OF JAPAN. 2-6
    • MV-22 SQUADRON GEO-LOCATIONFY2021 6 4 2 1 2 2 1 1 16/2 MCAS New River 16/22020 6 4 2 1 2 2 1 1 MCAS Miramar 6 4 2 1 2 2 1 1 16/22019 6 4 2 1 2 2 1 1 16/2 MCAS Futenma20182017 6 4 2 1 2 2 1 1 16/2 Guam (UDP) 16/22016 6 4 2 1 2 2 1 1 MCAS CamPen 16/12015 6 5 2 2 1 1 14/1 MCAS K-Bay2014 6 6 2 12013 6 5 1 1 12/1 MAG-41 (Miramar) 12/02012 6 6 MAG-49 (TBD) 10/02011 6 4 AC/RC 0 5 10 15 20 **Basing plans are subject to change and further environmental analysis** 2-7
    • MARINE HEAVY HELICOPTER (HMH) PLAN FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 TO TAL SQ UADRO NS/UNIT PMAI AC CH-53E CH-53E 7/16 8/16 8/16 8/16 8/16 8/16 8/16 8/16 8/16 7/16 7/16 AC CH-53D CH-53D 3/10 2/10 0/0 0/0 0/0 0/0 0/0 0/0 0/0 0/0 0/0 AC CH-53K CH-53K 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1/4 1/16 2/16 2/16 RC CH-53E CH-53E 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/16 1/16 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 PAI PLAN AC/RC PMAI CH-53D 30 19 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CH-53E 120 136 136 136 136 136 136 136 136 136 136 CH-53K 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 6 14 27 32 TOTAL AC/RC TACTICAL 150 136 136 136 136 136 138 142 150 163 168 FRS PTAI CH-53D 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CH-53E 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 CH-53K 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 6 9 9 TOTAL FRS PTAI 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 19 23 26 26 PDAI CH-53D 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CH-53E 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 CH-53K 0 0 4 4 4 4 4 6 2 2 2 TOTAL PDAI 4 2 6 6 6 6 6 8 4 4 4 POAI CH-53D 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CH-53E 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CH-53K 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 TOTAL POAI 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 TOTAL PAI 177 155 159 159 159 159 161 169 177 193 198GENERAL NOTES:1) ACTUAL AIRCRAFT INVENTORY IS LESS THAN PAI.2) TOTAL PROGRAM BUY IS 200 CH-53K. 2-8
    • MARINE HEAVY HELICOPTER (HMH) PLAN CURRENT FORCE: FORCE GOAL 7 AC SQDN X 16 CH-53E 8 AC SQDN X 16 CH-53K 2 AC SQDN X 10 CH-53D 1 FRS X 21 CH-53K 1 RC SQDN X 8 CH-53E 1 RC SQDN X 16 CH-53K 1 FRS X 17 CH-53E FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 UNIT /LOCAT ION PMAI MAG 29 HMHT -302 17 CH-53E K V HMH-366 (1) 16 CH-53E K V HMH-461 16 CH-53E K V HMH-464 16 CH-53E K V MAG 16 HMH-361 16 CH-53E HMH-462 16 CH-53E HMH-465 16 CH-53E HMH-466 16 CH-53E MAG 24 HMH-362 (2) 10 CH-53D D HMH-363 (3) 10 CH-53D M V V HMH-463 (4) 10 CH-53D E V MAG 49 HMH-772(-) (5) 8 CH-53E HMH-772 DET A (6) 8 CH-53E A A = ACTIVATE D = DEACTIVATE SQUADRON C = CADRE SQUADRON E = ENTERS CH-53E TRANSITION K = ENTERS CH-53K TRANSITION M = ENTERS MV-22 TRANSITION R = SQUADRON RELOCATION V = TRANSITION COMPLETENOTES:1) HMH-366 TEMPORARILY BASED IN CHERRY POINT AND MOVES TO NEW RIVER IN FY14.2) SQUADRON DEACTIVATES.3) SQUADRON TRANSITIONS TO VMM-363 DURING 3RD QTR FY12.4) SQUADRON TRANSITIONS TO CH-53E; LAST ACTIVE COMPONENT SQUADRON TO TRANSITION TO CH-53K.5) SQUADRON TRANSITION TO CH-53K FY25.6) DETACHMENT ACTIVATES. TRANSITIONS TO CH-53K IN FY26. 2-9
    • MARINE HEAVY LIFT SQUADRON GEO-LOCATION FY 8/12021 3 4 1 12020 3 4 1 1 8/1 MCAS Miramar2019 3 4 1 1 8/1 MCAS Cherry Point2018 3 4 1 1 8/1 JAS Willow Grove 8/12017 3 4 1 1 8/1 JB MDL (McGuire)2016 3 4 1 1 8/1 MCAS Kaneohe Bay2015 3 4 1 1 8/12014 3 4 1 1 8/12013 2 4 1 1 1 10/12012 2 4 3 1 1 10/12011 2 4 3 1 1 0 5 10 **Basing plans are subject to change and further environmental analysis** 2-10
    • MARINE LIGHT ATTACK HELICOPTER (HMLA) PLAN FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 TOTAL SQUADRONS/PRIMARY MISSION AIRCRAFT AUTHORIZED (PMAA) - REQUIREMENT AC AH-1W 8-18 8-18 7-18 6-18 5-18 4-18 3-18 2-18 0-0 0-0 0-0 AC UH-1N 2-9 1-9 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 RC AH-1W 1-18 1-18 1-18 1-18 1-18 1-18 1-18 1-18 1-18 0-0 0-0 RC UH-1N 1-9 1-9 1-9 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 AC AH-1Z 1-15 1-15 1-15 2-15 3-15 4-15 5-15 6-15 8-15 8-15 8-15 AC UH-1Y (Note 2) 6-9 7-9 7-9, 1-12 7-9, 1-12 5-9, 3-12 4-9, 4-12 2-9, 6-12 1-9, 7-12 8-12 8-12 8-12 RC AH-1Z 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 1-15 1-15 RC UH-1Y 0-0 0-0 0-0 1-9 1-9 1-9 1-9 1-9 1-9 1-12 1-12 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 PRIMARY AIRCRAFT INVENTORY (PAI) PLAN - INVENTORY AC/RC PMAI AH-1W /UH-1N 118-36 112-20 109-8 106-0 102-0 90-0 72-0 54-0 18-0 6-0 0-0 AH-1Z/UH-1Y 8-33 14-50 16-68 28-83 42-98 54-108 67-108 84-108 111-108 135-108 135-108 TOTAL AC/RC TACTICAL 126-69 126-70 125-76 134-83 144-98 144-108 139-108 138-108 129-108 141-108 135-108 FRS PTAI AH-1W /UH-1N 14-0 14-0 14-0 14-0 14-0 14-0 14-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 AH-1Z/UH-1Y 6-9 8-10 14-10 15-10 15-10 15-12 15-12 15-12 15-12 15-12 15-12 TOTAL FRS PTAI 20-9 22-10 28-10 29-10 29-10 29-12 29-12 15-12 15-12 15-12 15-12 PDAI AH-1W /UH-1N 3-2 3-2 3-2 3-2 3-2 1-2 1-2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 AH-1Z/UH-1Y 4-3 5-3 5-3 5-3 4-3 5-3 5-4 5-4 5-4 4-4 4-4 TOTAL PDAI 7-5 8-5 8-5 8-5 7-5 6-5 6-6 5-4 5-4 4-4 4-4 POAI HH-1N 4 4 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 UH-1Y 0 0 0 3 3 6 6 6 6 6 6 TOTAL POAI 4 4 4 3 3 6 6 6 6 6 6 BAI/PIPE AH-1W /UH-1N 0-5 0-5 0-5 0-0 0-0 7-0 14-0 27-0 36-0 33-0 39-0 AH-1Z/UH-1Y 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-3 0-15 0-29 0-29 7-29 35-29 TOTAL BAI/PIPE 0-5 0-5 0-5 0-0 0-0 7-3 14-15 27-29 36-29 40-29 74-29 PMAI PER HMLA (W/N) 13-9 12-9 13-3 15-0 17-0 18-0 18-0 18-0 18-0 6-0 6-0 PMAI PER HMLA (Z/Y) 8-5 14-7 16-9 14-9 14-11 13-12 13-12 14-12 13-12 15-12 15-12 PAI 153-87 156-89 161-95 171-101 180-116 179-131 174-132 158-130 149-130 160-130 154-130 TAI (Note 5) 155-92 156-94 161-100 171-101 180-116 186-134 188-147 185-159 185-159 200-159 228-159 PROGRAM OF RECORD 189-160 189-160 189-160 189-160 189-160 189-160 189-160 189-160 189-160 189-160 189-160GENERAL NOTES:1) TOTAL PROCUREMENT OBJECTIVE IS 160 UH-1Y AND 189 AH-1Z.2) THE CHANGE IN AIRCRAFT MIX WITHIN AN HMLA, AND ITS CORRESPONDING PMAA ADJUSTMENT, WILL OCCUR BY SQUADRON AS EACH SQUADRON COMPLETES ITS AH-1Z CONVERSION.3) PMAI WILL DROP BELOW PMAA FOR UH-1Y THROUGH FY17 AND AH-1 UNTIL SUNDOWN OF AH-1W4) SIX AH-1W INVENTORY IN FY20 IS FINAL HMLA 773 FINAL DET SITE.5) TAI = PAI + BAI (IF AVAILABLE). THE AH-1W BAI NUMBERS IN FY20 AND FY21 ARE BEYOND MARINE CORPS REQUIREMENTS AND REPRESENT DON EXCESS DEFENSE ARTICLES. 2-11
    • MARINE LIGHT ATTACK HELICOPTER (HMLA) PLAN 1 FRS X 13 AH-1W/0 UH-1N SAR 3 X UH-1Y (Yuma) 5 AH-1Z/8 UH-1Y 3 X UH-1Y (Cherry Point) SAR 3 X HH-1N (Yuma) 4 X HH-46E (Cherry Point) FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 UNIT /LOCAT ION PMAI MAG-39 HMLAT -303 15 AH-1/12 UH-1 V HMLA-367 (1 & 2) 15 AH-1/12 UH-1 V RELOCAT ION HMLA-369 15 AH-1/12 UH-1 Z V HMLA-169 15 AH-1/12 UH-1 V Z V HMLA-267 15 AH-1/12 UH-1 V Z V HMLA-469 15 AH-1/12 UH-1 Y V Z V MAG-29 HMLA-167 15 AH-1/12 UH-1 Y V Z V HMLA-269 15 AH-1/12 UH-1 Y V Z V HMLA-467 (3) 15 AH-1/12 UH-1 Y V Z V MAG-24 HMLA-367 (1 & 2) 15 AH-1/12 UH-1 RELOCAT ION Z V MAG-49 HMLA-773 15 AH-1/12 UH-1 Y V Z V SAR Yuma SAR 3 UH-1Y Y V Cherry Point SAR 3 UH-1Y Y V Y = YANKEE TRANSITION BEGINS Z = ZULU TRANSITION BEGINS B = SIMULTANEOUS TRANSITION V = TRANSITION COMPLETENOTES:1) HMLA-367 RELOCATES TO MCAS KANEOHE BAY. IOC 1ST QTR FY13. FOC 1ST QTR FY15.2) HMLA-367 SOURCES FIRST TWO AH-1Z/UH-1Y MEU DETS WHILE MAINTAINING AH-1W. HMLA-367 WILL RETAIN FIVE AH-1W AND FOUR UH-1Y FOR RELOCATION TO HAWAII.3) HMLA-467 TEMPORARILY BASED IN CHERRY POINT AND MOVES TO NEW RIVER IN FY13. **Basing plans are subject to change and further environmental analysis** 2-12
    • MARINE LIGHT ATTACK SQUADRON GEO-LOCATIONFY2021 3 4 1 1 8/12020 3 4 1 1 8/12019 3 4 1 1 8/1 MCAS New River 8/12018 3 4 1 1 MCAS CamPen 8/12017 3 4 1 1 MCAS Kaneohe Bay 8/12016 3 4 1 1 8/1 MAG-49 (Multiple Sites)2015 3 4 1 12014 3 4 1 1 8/1 MCAS Cherry Point 8/12013 3 4 1 1 8/1 AC/RC2012 2 5 1 1 8/12011 2 5 1 1 0 5 10 **Basing plans are subject to change and further environmental analysis** 2-13
    • MARINE HELICOPTER SQUADRON ONE (HMX-1) PLAN CURRENT FORCE: VH-3D X 11 FORCE GOAL: VXX x TBD VH-60N X 8 MV-22B X 14 CH-46E X 14 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 UNIT/LOCATION TAI HMX-1 QUANTICO 11 VH-3D 8 VH-60N 7 CH-46E M V 6 CH-53E CV M = MV-22B TRANSITION BEGINS C = CH-46E TRANSITION BEGINS V = TRANSITION COMPLETE FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 AIRCRAFT TYPE/TAI VH-3D 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 VH-60N 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 CH-46E 14 14 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 VXX 0 0 0 0 0 0 TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD MV-22B 0 0 6 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 TO TAL HMX-1 TAI 33 33 33 33 33 33 33 33 33 33 33GENERAL NOTES:1) RMD-802 TERMINATES VH-71 PROGRAM AND RESTARTS VXX PROGRAM IN FY11.2) 6 MV-22B DELIVERED FY13; 6 CH-46E PHASED OUT FY13.3) 8 MV-22B DELIVERED FY14; 8 CH-46E PHASED OUT FY14.4) HMX-1 IS LOCATED AT MCAF QUANTICO, VA. **Basing plans are subject to change and further environmental analysis** 2-14
    • MARINE SEARCH AND RESCUE (SAR) PLAN CURRENT FORCE: 3 X HH-46E, 3 X HH-1N FORCE GOAL: 6 X UH-1Y FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 UNIT/LOCATION POAAMCAS CHERRY POINT VMR-1 3 HH-46E 3 UH-1Y Y V MCAS YUMA 3 HH-1N 3 UH-1Y Y VY = YANKEE TRANSITIONV = TRANSITION COMPLETE FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21SAR PAI PLANSAR POAIHH-46E 3 3 3 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0HH-1N 3 3 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0UH-1Y 0 0 0 0 3 6 6 6 6 6 6TOTAL SAR PAI 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 **Basing plans are subject to change and further environmental analysis** 2-15
    • SECTION 3 --- MARINE FIXED-WING AND TACTICAL AVIATION PLANMarine Fixed-Wing Aviation Plan 3-2TACAIR Integration Update 3-3TACAIR Legacy to Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) Transition Plan 3-4Marine Aerial Refueler / Transport (VMGR) Plan 3-7Marine Electronic Attack (VMAQ) Plan 3-10Marine Operational Support Aircraft (OSA) Plan 3-12 3-1
    • Marine Fixed-Wing Aviation PlanMissions MARINE FIGHTER TRAINING SQUADRON (VMFT): Provide adversary F-5 support to the FleetMARINE FIGHTER/ATTACK SQUADRON (VMFA): Support the MAGTF commander by Replacement Squadron (VMFAT-101), to Fleet Squadron Core readiness training, and to thedestroying surface targets and enemy aircraft, and escort friendly aircraft, day or Weapons and Tactics Instructor (WTI) course. This is a reserve squadron.night, under all weather conditions during expeditionary, joint or combinedoperations. OPERATIONAL SUPPORT AIRCRAFT (OSA): Provide time-sensitive air transport of high priority passengers and cargo to, within, and between theaters of war.MARINE ALL-WEATHER FIGHTER/ATTACK SQUADRON (VMFA-AW): Support theMAGTF commander by providing supporting arms coordination, conducting multi-sensor imagery, and destroying surface targets and enemy aircraft day or night, under Legacy Aircraftall weather conditions during expeditionary, joint, or combined operations. EA-6B: The USMC currently has four active VMAQ squadrons. Two have completed the transition toMARINE FIGHTER/ATTACK TRAINING SQUADRON (VMFAT): Conduct combat capable the Improved Capabilities (ICAP) III version of the Prowler and all four squadrons willfighter/attack training for selected aircrews in the Joint Strike Fighter F-35B aircraft complete transition by June 2012. USMC EA-6B operational capability will be sustainedand the legacy F/A-18 and provide technical training for aviation maintenancepersonnel. through 2019. This structure is intended to remain whole until the first squadron decommissions in late 2016, with one squadron decommissioning each successive year until the end of 2019. Going forward, MAGTF EW will witness the integration of manned andMARINE ATTACK SQUADRON (VMA): Support the MAGTF commander by destroying unmanned airborne and ground EW capabilities to provide the MAGTF Commander thesurface targets, and escort friendly aircraft, day or night, under all weather conditionsduring expeditionary, joint or combined operations. ability to control the Electro-Magnetic Spectrum (EMS) at the time and place of his choosing. Airborne capabilities will be provided by EW payloads such as Intrepid Tiger, the EW capabilities inherent to F-35, and possibly Next Generation Jammer technologies.MARINE ATTACK TRAINING SQUADRON (VMAT): Conduct combat capable attacktraining for selected aircrews in the AV-8B and provide technical training for aviationmaintenance personnel. FA-18 A-D, AV-8B: The USMC currently has twelve active VMFA/VMFA(AW) squadrons and one reserve VMFA.MARINE REFUELING TRANSPORT SQUADRON (VMGR): Support the MAGTF Two active and two reserve squadrons have been placed into cadre status to support thecommander by providing aerial refueling, assault support, conducting intelligence, manpower needs of JSF transition. These squadrons will be reconstituted with the F-35B.surveillance, reconnaissance, target acquisition, indirect and direct fires adjustment, There are currently seven active VMAs comprised of fourteen AV-8Bs aircraft apiece.battlefield damage assessment and destroying surface targets day or night under allweather conditions during expeditionary, joint, or combined operations. KC-130T (Reserve only):MARINE TACTICAL ELECTRONIC WARFARE SQUADRON (VMAQ): Support the MAGTF USMCR KC-130T squadrons are planned to transition to the KC-130J beginning in FY15. KC-commander by conducting airborne electronic warfare, day or night, under all 130T aircraft will be retired incrementally as KC-130J aircraft are delivered to 4th MAWweather conditions during expeditionary, joint, or combined operations. VMGR squadrons. The KC-130T provides the only DASC(A) capability in the USMC aircraft inventory.MARINE UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE SQUADRON (VMU):Support the MAGTF commander by conducting reconnaissance, surveillance, target New Aircraft Test and Evaluation Updatesacquisition, indirect fires adjustment, battlefield damage assessment (BDA) and JSF (F-35B)support the rear area security plan during expeditionary, joint or combinedoperations. DEVELOPMENTAL TEST: Ongoing through FY16. OPERATIONAL TEST AND EVALUATION: Commences FY14 for Block 2. Block 3 OT&E TBD. 3-2
    • New Aircraft Test and Evaluation Updates (continued) TACAIR INTEGRATION (TAI) UPDATEINITIAL OPERATIONAL CAPABILITY: A revised Memorandum of Agreement with the Navy was signed in May 2011. It stipulates that the FA-18A-D will source UDP requirementsJoint Strike Fighter IOC prerequisites delineated in the 1 March 2010 and that FA-18A/C and F-35C will source Navy Carrier Air Wing (CVW)DCA requirements letter to the JSF Program Executive Officer in March requirements.2010 reflect the USMC warfighting requirements for the F-35B. Thesespecifics include, but are not limited to, 10 aircraft capable of executing The Marine Corps has three squadrons integrated into CVWs, while theassigned TACAIR mission sets and 6 aircraft capable of an austere Navy has one VFA squadron integrated into the Marine Corps Unitand/or ship-based detachment. The USMC plan is to maintain these Deployment Program (UDP). This provides the Navy with a “net gain” ofbaseline requirements, field the aircraft as delivered, train to the two squadrons. With the elimination of Navy support to UDP in FY12,capabilities as they are cleared for operational use, and achieve IOC the Marine Corps will move to a support level of three squadrons.when the aircraft and support is delivered without limitations.When IOC will be achieved will be dependent upon restructure of the F/A-18 SERVICE LIFE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM (SLMP)Joint Strike Fighter Program and on when the Marine Corps has aclearer understanding on flight test plans, software development The health of our FA-18 inventory is critical to the success of TAI andimprovements, and aircraft delivery schedules. the Department of the Navy’s TACAIR support to the warfighter. This aircraft is also critical to the success of the MAGTF.Fleet aircrew and maintenance training is expected commence in FY12.VMFA-332 will re-activate in FY12 at MCAS Yuma, AZ. The current Center Barrel Replacement Plus (CBR+) program will extend the life of the Lot 17 and below aircraft (421 total) to 1.0 WingKC-130J Root Fatigue Life (WRFLE).HARVEST HAWK: In response to an Urgent Universal Need Statement,the USMC integrated a bolt-on/bolt-off ISR/weapon mission kit for useon existing KC-130J aircraft. This mission kit is designed to re-configure Commander, Naval Air Forces (CNAF) and DCA released messagesany KC-130J aircraft rapidly into a platform capable of performing outlining a program to better manage our use of Hornet service life.persistent targeting ISR from a AN/AAQ-30 Targeting Sight System Under this program, service life is managed for each individual aircraftmounted on the aft portion of the left hand external fuel tank. enabling a more comprehensive and efficient approach to aircraftAdditionally, the mission kit enables the aircraft to deliver precision service life preservation. In addition, the Service Life Extensionfires using HELLFIRE and Griffin munitions. This mission kit is designed Program (SLEP) will determine investments required to extend the FA-as a complementary capability that takes advantage of the aircraft’s 18 A+/C/D to 10,000 Flight Hours. Earlier phases of this programextended endurance. The capability has been deployed since Oct, extended the catapult and landing limits of the A+/C/D to 2700 and2010 and has experienced overwhelming success in theater. Feedback 14,500 respectively (1500 catapults and 17,000 landing for the FA-18D).from supported units is outstanding. Three kits have been delivered to The first kit that will extend the airframe to 10,000 flight hours will bethe Fleet to provide continuous support for OEF. installed in 2012. 3-3
    • TACAIR LEGACY TO JSF TRANSITION PLAN FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 TO TAL SQ UADRO NS FA-18A+/C 8 8 8 8 8 8 7 6 4 3 2 FA-18D 5 5 5 5 4 4 3 3 3 3 1 AV-8B 7 7 7 7 6 6 6 6 6 5 5 F-35B 0 0 1 1 1 2 3 3 4 5 6 F-35C 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 3 4 4 FA-18 FRS 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 AV-8B FRS 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 F-35B FRS 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 F-5N/F 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY 21 PAI PLAN AC/RC PMAI FA-18A+/C 96 96 96 96 96 96 84 72 48 36 24 FA-18D 60 60 60 60 48 48 36 36 36 36 12 AV-8B 98 98 98 98 84 84 84 84 84 70 70 F-35B 0 1 16 16 16 26 36 36 46 56 66 F-35C 0 0 0 0 0 6 10 20 30 30 40 F-5N/F 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 TO TAL AC/RC TACTICAL 267 268 283 283 257 273 263 261 257 241 225 FRS PTAI FA-18A/C 23 23 24 23 19 18 18 17 12 11 8 FA-18B 4 4 4 4 3 2 2 1 0 0 0 FA-18D 17 17 17 16 15 15 14 14 12 10 8 AV-8B 14 14 14 12 12 12 12 12 12 10 10 T AV-8B 14 14 14 12 12 12 12 12 12 10 10 F-35B 3 15 16 17 14 14 17 28 36 45 50 F-35C 0 0 0 2 7 13 14 14 14 14 14 TO TAL FRS PTAI 75 87 89 86 82 86 89 98 98 100 100* Operational commitments, contingency plans, and service life expenditure rates may change T/M/S turnoversequence 3-4
    • TACAIR LEGACY TO JSF TRANSITION PLAN CURRENT FORCE: FORCE GOAL: 7 AC VMFA SQDN x 12 F/A-18 A/C 9 AC VMFA SQDN x 10 F-35B 5 AC VMFA(AW) SQDN x 12 F/A-18D 7 AC VMFA SQDN x 16 F-35B 1 RC VMFA SQDN x 12 F/A-18C 5 AC VMFA SQDN x 10 F-35C 7 AC VMA SQDN x 14 AV-8B 3 RC VMFA SQDN x 10 F-35B 1 FRS x 28 AV-8B/TAV-8B 2 FRS SQDN x 25 F-35B 1 FRS x 38 F/A-18 A/B/C/D RED = F-35C, BLACK = F-35B B = Transition complete, initial complement of aircraft, equipment, and trained personnel assigned C = Commencement of transition from a Cadre status N = New squadron, applies to F-35B FRS squadrons; VMFAT-501 and VMFAT-502 T = Commencement of transition from a legacy TACAIR squadronGENERAL NOTES:1) JSF TRANSITION CONTINUES BEYOND FY21 TO INCLUDE THREE RESERVE SQUADRONS2) 14 F-35C AIRCRAFT WILL SUPPORT USMC PILOT TRAINING AT VFA-101 AT EGLIN AFB.3) VMFA(AW)-242 WILL RELOCATE AND ASSIGN TO MAG-31 AT MCAS BEAUFORT IN FY18. VMFA(AW)-242 WILL SUBSEQUENTLY TRANSITION TO F-35B IN FY21. 3-5
    • MARINE JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER SQUADRON GEO-LOCATION FY2021 2 5 2 1 2 1 13/0 ITC/PTC - 1 Apr 10: VMFAT-501 activated 2 4 2 1 2 11/0 - 2014: VMFAT-501 moves to MCAS2020 Beaufort - 2017: VMFAT-502 – MCAS Beaufort 9/02019 2 3 2 1 1 MCAS Yuma - RFO: 1 May 2012 - VMFA-332 IOC TBD 7/02018 2 2 2 1 MCAS Beaufort2017 2 2 1 1 6/0 - RFO: 1 Jan 2014 Act / Res - Proposed PTC Location2016 1 2 1 4/0 2/0 Order of aircraft retirement MCAS Iwakuni2015 1 1 – F/A-18A-D - RFO: 1 Mar 2014 (Planned UDP) – AV-8B - VMFA-332 PCS from Yuma 2017 2/0 – F/A-18C (Reserve)2014 1 1 Order of base activation – MCAS Yuma MCAS Miramar 2/0 - RFO: 1 Aug 20182013 1 1 – – MCAS Beaufort MCAS Iwakuni – MCAS Miramar 2/02012 1 1 – MCAS Cherry Point MCAS Cherry Point 1/0 - RFO: 1 Jul 20192011 1 0 5 10 15 **Basing plans are subject to change and further environmental analysis** 3-6
    • MARINE AERIAL REFUELER / TRANSPORT (VMGR) PLAN FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 PAI PLAN AC/RC PMAI KC-130J 44 46 46 47 48 50 52 54 56 58 60 KC-130T 24 24 24 24 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 TOTAL AC/RC PMAI 68 70 70 71 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 TOTAL PAI 69 71 71 72 69 69 69 69 69 69 69GENERAL NOTES:1) PMAI FOR AC VMGR SQUADRONS INCREASED TO 15 (+3) IN FY11.2) TOTAL AIRCRAFT INVENTORY (TAI) PROGRAM OF RECORD IS 79 KC-130J AIRCRAFT.3) PDAI IS ONE KC-130J AIRCRAFT.4) PIPELINE/ATTRITION AIRCRAFT INTRODUCED BEGINNING IN FY28. 3-7
    • MARINE AERIAL REFUELER / TRANSPORT (VMGR) PLAN C URRENT FO RC E: 1 AC SQDN X 15 KC-130J FO RC E GO AL: 3 AC SQDN X 15 KC-130J 2AC SQDN X 14 KC-130J 2 RC SQDN X 12 KC-130J 2 RC SQDN X 12 KC-130T FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 UNIT /LOCAT ION PMAI 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 MAG-36 FUT VMGR-152 15 KC-130J P R SEE NOT ES 1 & 2 MAG-12 IWK VMGR-152 15 KC-130J R SEE NOT ES 1 & 2 MAG-11 MIR VMGR-352 15 KC-130J P MAG-14 C PT VMGR-252 15 KC-130J P MAG-49 JB MDL VMGR-452 ST W 12 KC-130T RET IRE AS JS DLVR. VMGR-452 ST W KC-130J J V MAG-41 FTW VMGR-234 12 KC-130T RET IRE AS JS DLVR VMGR-234 KC-130J J NAVAIRSYSC O M VX-20 1 KC-130J T RANSFER T O VMGR-452 J = KC-130J TRANSITION BEGINS NOTES: V = TRANSITION COMPLETE 1) SUBJECT TO THE CONDITIONS IDENTIFIED BETWEEN THE U.S. GOVERNMENT AND THE GOVERNMENT OF JAPAN. P = PMAI INCREASES TO 15 2) DELAY OF ONE YEAR FROM FY11 AVPLAN DUE TO MULTIPLE VARIABLES AFFECTING CONSTRUCTION TIMELINE. R = RELOCATION FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 TO TAL SQ UADRO NS AC KC-130J 1-15 AC KC-130J 2-14 3-15 3-15 3-15 3-15 3-15 3-15 3-15 3-15 3-15 3-15 RC KC-130T 2-12 2-12 2-12 2-12 1-8 1-6 1-4 RC KC-130T 1-12 1-12 1-12 1-14 1-12 1-10 1-8 RC KC-130J 1-3 1-5 1-6 1-6 1-6 1-7 1-8 RC KC-130J 1-1 1-3 1-5 1-6 1-7GENERAL NOTES:1) TRANSITION PLAN AS DEPICTED IS DCA APPROVED BY LOCATION AND UNIT.2) PROGRAM OF RECORD IS 51 ACTIVE COMPONENT AND 28 RESERVE COMPONENT KC-130J AIRCRAFT. REQUIREMENT IS FOR 3 AC SQUADRONS OF 15 AIRCRAFT (PMAI), 2 RC SQUADRONS OF12 AIRCRAFT (PMAI) PLUS 1 KC-130J AIRCRAFT AT VX-20 AND 9 KC-130J BAI PIPELINE/ATTRITION AIRCRAFT. THE KC-130J AT VX-20 IS PLANNED TO TRANSFER TO VMGR-452 IN FY15 TOACCELERATE THE 4th MAW KC-130J TRANSITION.3) HARVEST HAWK MISSION KITS DISCUSSED IN SECTION 7 AND ON PAGE 17-7. 3-8
    • MARINE AERIAL REFUELER / TRANSPORT SQUADRON GEO-LOCATION FY 3/22021 1 1 1 1 1 3/22020 1 1 1 1 1 3/2 MCAS Cherry Point2019 1 1 1 1 12018 1 1 1 1 1 3/2 MCAS Miramar 3/22017 1 1 1 1 1 MCAS Futenma 3/22016 1 1 1 1 1 3/2 MCAS Iwakuni2015 1 1 1 1 1 3/2 NAS JRB Ft Worth2014 1 1 1 1 1 3/22013 1 1 1 1 1 Stewart ANGB 3/22012 1 1 1 1 1 3/22011 1 1 1 1 1 AC/RC 0 2 4 6 **Basing plans are subject to change and further environmental analysis** 3-9
    • MARINE ELECTRONIC ATTACK (VMAQ) PLAN CURRENT FORCE: 4 AC SQDN X 5 EA-6B FORCE GOAL: Electronic Warfare System of Systems FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 UNIT/LOCATION PM AI/PTAI MAG-14 NKT VM AQ-1 5 EA-6B 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 0 0 0 0 VM AQ-2 5 EA-6B 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 0 0 VM AQ-3 5 EA-6B 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 0 0 0 VM AQ-4 5 EA-6B 5 5 5 5 5 5 0 0 0 0 0 VM AQT 6 EA-6B 0 0 0 0 TBD TBD TBD 0 0 0 0VMAQ s qua dron s tand down begi ns FY16 a nd i s compl eted i n FY19.USMC EA-6B orga ni za tiona l s tructure rema i ns 4 opera tiona l s qua drons (5 a /c ea ch). Structure a nd PMAI/PTAI wi l l be revi ewed a nnua l l y. FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21TOTAL S QUADRONS /UNIT PMAIAC EA-6B PM AI 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 2 1 0 0AC EA-6B PTAI 0 0 0 0 TBD TBD TBD 0 0 0 0 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21PAI PLANAC PMAI/PTAIEA-6B PM AI 20 20 20 20 20 20 15 10 5 0 0EA-6B PTAI 0 0 0 TBD TBD TBD 0 0 0 0 0TOTAL AC PMAI/PTAI 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 15 10 5 0 3-10
    • MARINE ELECTRONIC ATTACK SQUADRON GEO-LOCATIONFY 3-11
    • MARINE OPERATIONAL SUPPORT AIRLIFT (OSA) PLAN FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 POAI PLAN UC-12F/M 6 6 6 4 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 UC-12W 6 6 6 8 10 12 12 12 12 12 12 UC-35C/D 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 10 10 10 10 UC-35 "ER" 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 C-20G 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 C-20RA 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 C-9B 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 C-40A 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 2 2 TOTAL 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 27GENERAL NOTE:1) COMMENCING IN FY17, HQMC AVIATION INTENDS TO MAKE C-40A DETACHMENTS AVAILABLE IN HAWAII IOT IMPROVE MEDIUM LIFT OSA SUPPORT IN MARFORPAC AOR. MCAS KANEOHEBAY C-40A EXPERIENCE WILL INFORM PLANNING FOR FUTURE C-40A DETACHMENTS. 3-12
    • MARINE OPERATIONAL SUPPORT AIRLIFT (OSA) PLAN CURRENT FO RCE:12 UC-35C/D FO RCE GO AL: 12 Extended Range Replacement aircraft 12 UC-12F/M/W 12 UC-12W 1 C-20G 1 C-20 Replacement Aircraft 2 C-9B 2 C-40AT = T RANSIT ION FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY10 FY20 FY21 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 UNIT /LOCAT ION PAI MCAS CHERRY PT VMR-1 2 UC-35D 2 C-9B 2 C-40A T MCAS NEW RIVER VMR DET NR 2 UC-12F 2 UC-12W T ** MCAS BEAUFO RT VMR DET BFT 2 UC-12M 2 UC-12W T ** MCAS MIRAMAR VMR DET MIR 2 UC-35D 1 UC-12W MCAS YUMA VMR DET YUMA 2 UC-12F 2 UC-12W T ** MCAF K-BAY VMR DET K-BAY 1 C-20G 1 C-20RA T MCAS FUTENMA VMR DET FUT 3 UC-35D 1 UC-35D 2 UC-35 "ER" T 1 UC-12W MCAS IWAKUNI VMR DET IWA 2 UC-12W NAF ANDREWS VMR ANDREWS 3 UC-35D NAS JRB NO VMR BELLE CHASSE 2 UC-35C 2 UC-35D T 2 UC-12WT = T ransition **Basing plans are subject to change and further environmental analysis** 3-13
    • MARINE OSA TRANSFORMATION UC-12 F/M/W UC-12W ASE “Super Mid Size”UC-35C / D UC-35ER ASE ASE “Like in Kind”C-20G C-20RA ASE C-9B C-40A ASEASE Has Aircraft Survivability Equipment (ASE)ASE Will have Aircraft Survivability Equipment 3-14
    • USMC OSA LAYDOWN WESTPAC IWAKUNIC20G 2xUC12W ANDREWS CHERRY POINT 3xUC35D x1 FUTENMA 2xC-9B 3xUC35DC9B 2xUC35D 1xUC12W NEW RIVER 2xUC12F x2UC35C/D BEAUFORT 2xUC12M MIRAMAR x12 1xUC12WUC12 2xUC35D YUMA BELLE CHASSE 2xUC12F 2xUC35C x12 KBAY 2xUC12W 1xC20G 3-15
    • SECTION 4 --- MARINE RESERVE AVIATION PLANReserve Integration and Total Force 4-2MARFORRES/4th MAW Organizational Chart 4-4AVPLAN Reserve Integration Strategy (AVRIS) 4-5AVRIS Implementation Timeline 4-6Current Laydown & Future Restructuring Initiatives (Aviation & HQ Units) 4-7Current Laydown & Future Restructuring Initiatives (Aviation Support Units) 4-8 4-1
    • RESERVE INTEGRATION AND TOTAL FORCE SEVEN LINES OF OPERATIONIMMEDIATE AND SUSTAINED AUGMENTATION AND REINFORCEMENT: Under the 1. CURRENT FIGHT. 4th MAW will be constantly postured to support the currentSECDEF’s guidance to build an operational reserve, 4th MAW must be postured to fight in Operation ENDURING FREEDOM (OEF) – and/or other areas of operationsprovide support and reinforcement to the Marine Corps total force complement of as directed by the Commandant. We will provide manned, trained and equippedAir Wings, Divisions and MLGs on an immediate, sustained and enduring basis. The units for instant deployment and sustained combat operations. Recent examples4th MAW CG, Wing Staff and five group commanders are tasked with ensuring the include HMH-772’s deployment to OEF and our sustained VMR support toconditions for success are set and the Air Groups are postured for the immediate MARCENT.support by being ready for both OCONUS and CONUS operations. 4th MAW is readyto provide capability, capacity and options for the Commandant and warfighting 2. THEATER SECURITY COOPERATION. 4th MAW will be postured to provideForce and MEF commanders. The reserve air wing of today’s Marine Corps will not forces to meet COCOM and MARFOR demand for TSC forces ISO of our allies andhave the luxury of 120, 90, 60 or even 30 days of warning time before deployment. partner nations around the globe in each of the combatant commanders’ areas ofAs the Marine Corps completes its DOD budget and FSRG contraction, the Reserve responsibility and operations. Recent deployments have included units, personnelMAW will be able to answer immediately the Commandant’s call to support Marine and IAs from MAG-41, MWSG-47, MACG-48, MAG-49 and the MAW staff.Corps worldwide operations. 4th MAW will be postured constantly as an operationalair wing in order to fight today’s fight with today’s forces and give the Commandant 3. PRE-DEPLOYMENT TRAINING. 4th MAW will be postured to support training forthe ability to instantly deploy his reserve MAW ISO full spectrum operations as part our young men and women next in line for deployment. As the active componentof the “two fisted fighter” and America’s expeditionary force in readiness. air wings are challenged with “white space” training, the reserves of 4th MAW will fill in the gaps and seams. Examples of this are support of Enhanced Mojave ViperOPERATIONAL RESERVE AIRWING: 4th MAW is a mirror image – albeit smaller force from our rotary-wing, fixed-wing, control group and support group squadrons.– of its partner active component air wings. The MAW is engaged 24/7/365 both inand outside of CONUS. On any given day, 4th MAW Forces are supporting CombatOperations in CENTCOM, Theater Security Cooperation in SOUTHCOM, PTP inTwenty-nine Palms, OPLANS ISO 1st MAW and PACOM, UDP with SPMAGTFs, andStaff Support to JTFs, MARFORs, MEFs, MEBs and MEU Commanders. 4-2
    • RESERVE INTEGRATION AND TOTAL FORCE Critical Paths for FY2012 are: Continued development of a reserve VMU capability. Force-wide, VMU dwell is4. OPLANS. 4th MAW will be constantly postured to support both OPLAN not at a sustainable level. 4th MAW will continue to stand up VMU-4, and will workexercises and real world operations. An example is the recent exercising of MAG- to stand up VMU-5 in FY2012 with existing available facilities on the east coast,41 as the air combat element under 1st MEB. MAG-41 is ready to deploy as a portions of VMU-4’s RQ-7B systems, and available structure from the 2010 FSRG.Group ACE in support of MEB operations. The MAW’s aviation command and VMUs -4 and -5 will be made whole from an RQ-7B systems procurementcontrol team (AC2T) also deploy on a yearly basis in support of 1st MAW for perspective through the POM process, estimated completion date of FY2015. Forexercises on the Korean peninsula. the coming year, 4th MAW will ensure our VMU operations are as closely integrated with east and west coast MAGTF operations as possible.5. UNIT DEPLOYMENT PROGRAM. 4th MAW will be postured to support UnitDeployment Program (UDP) commitments. With the battle rhythm demands on Transition to the MV-22. 4th MAW will begin to accept the MV-22 on the westthe active component, we will be ready to fill a UDP requirement in short order. coast in FY2013. Reserve manpower plans and formal school training slots have considerable lead time and are well underway to accommodate the initial6. STAFFS. 4th MAW will be postured to provide highly-qualified individual staff operational capability timeline on the west coast. SMCR pilots and maintainersofficers to augment and reinforce the JTFs, MARFORS, MEFs, MEBs and MEUs as have been joined to 4th MAW and are currently working at the east coast MV-22they prepare for and fight real world contingencies. An example of this force fleet replacement squadron in order to begin the reserve MV-22 recruiting cycle,multiplying capacity is resident in our standing AC2T, a team that gained which will draw from all available aviators and maintainers, not only the CH-46prominence during OIF I in the CFACC CAOC. population. East coast reserve MV-22 acceptance is set for FY2016. Basing initiatives are maturing and are aligned with both campaign plan themes and7. SHOCK ABSORBER. 4th MAW will be postured to push personnel, dets and proximity to active component MAGTF elements as we establish capability withinunits up and into the active component, and also will be ready to receive them available resources.back into the reserves. We are postured and committed to make this a seamlessand transparent operation IOT meet the demand signals from an active Sustainment of current aviation capabilities. We will continue the hard work ofcomponent with increasing OPTEMPO and commitments with decreasing assets. maintaining the readiness of an aging fleet of aircraft. As the active component transitions to next generation aircraft, legacy aircraft manning, training and parts availability will become more challenging for us as the remaining operators. Keeping our legacy aircraft in a ready status will require continued rigorous recruiting of trained prior service Marines, effective use of training plans, and efficient use of support materiel. 4-3
    • FY-12 MARFORRES/4th MAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART MARFORRES NEW ORLEANS 4th MAW NEW ORLEANS MAG-41 MAG-49 MACG-48 MATSG-42 JRB FT WORTH JB MDL, NJ NS GREAT LAKES, IL (NPA) (NFW) (WRI) (NSGL) MAG-49 DET A (WRB) AC2TMAG-41 DET A (EDW) MALS-49 (SWF) MTACS-48 (NSGL) (NSGL) MAG-49 DET B (SWF)MALS-41 (-) (NFW) MALS-49 DET A (WRB) MAG-49 DET C (NBG) MACS-24(-) (DAM NECK) VMR ANDREWS MALS-49 DET B (WRI) (ADW) MALS-41 DET A (NKX) MAG-49 DET D (NGU) MACS-24 ATC DET (NFW) MALS-49 DET C (NBG) VMR VMGR-234 HMM-774 (NGU) MASS-6 (-) (CEF) BELLE CHASSE MALS-49 DET D (NGU) (NBG) VMFA-112 VMGR-452 (SWF) MASS-6 DET A (NKX) VMFT-401 (NYL) MWSS-472 (-) (WRI) SITE SUPPORT MWCS-48 (NSGL) (NKX) HMH-772 (-) (WRI) MWSS-472 DET A (WPA)HMM-764 (EDW) MWCS-48 DET A FWD(NKX) HMLA-773 (-) (WRB) MWSS-472 DET B (CEF) MWSS-471(-) (MINNEAPOLIS) MWCS-48 DET B (CEF) HMLA-773 DET A (NBG)MWSS-471 DET A (JST) VMU-4(-) (Camp Pendleton) HMLA-773 DET B (WRI)MWSS-471 DET B (MTC) VMU-4 DET (NYL)MWSS-473 (-) (NKX) VMU-5 (TBD)MWSS-473 DET A (NLC)MWSS-473 DET B (NFW) EDW – Edwards AFB, CA NKX – MCAS Miramar, CA NYL – MCAS Yuma, AZ SWF – Stewart Int’l, NY NBG – NAS JRB New Orleans, LA NGU – NS Norfolk, VA JST – Johnstown Co., PA WPA – Wyoming, PA CEF – Westover ARB, MA CP – MCB Camp Pendleton NPA – NAS Pensacola, FL WRB – Warner-Robins, GA MTC – Selfridge ANGB, MI WRI – Joint Base McGuire, NJ BKF – Buckley AFB, CO NLC - NAS Lemoore ADW – Joint Base Andrews/NAF Washington, MD 4-4
    • AVPLAN RESERVE INTEGRATION STRATEGY (AVRIS) SUPPORTING MARINE AVIATION Complete Near/Mid-Term Long Term (FY 2012-2015) (FY 2016-2025) RIS INITIATIVES • LEGACY SUSTAINMENT• VMU-4 (RQ-7B) ESTABLISH • JB M-D-L BRAC RELOCATE (CH-53E, F-5, F-18A+, AH-1W)• MATSG 42 • MV-22 ACCEPT • KC-130J ACCEPT• AR STRUCTURE REALIGN • UH-1Y ACCEPT • UAS Group 4 FIELDING• TACC/MCCLAT REORGANIZE (ACT2) • KC-130J ACCEPT • AH-1Z ACCEPT• ATS IMPLEMENT/IOC • VMU-4 SITING • VMFA-142/134 REACTIVATE• WRB BRAC RELOCATE • VMU-5 STANDUP • JSF ACCEPT• SITE SUPPORT MIRAMAR • F-5 UPGRADE/ TRANSITION • CH-53K ACCEPTESTABLISH • ATS FOC • JSF MILCON COORDINATE • 4th MAW FSRG IMPLEMENTATION • GATOR ACCEPT Reserve Aviation Strategic Goals • Uninterrupted levels of support in all six functions of Marine aviation • Manageable transition to next generation aircraft/equipment/personnel • Mitigation of legacy transitional shortfalls • Augmentation and reinforcement of AC across 4th MAW (7) lines of operation 4-5
    • AVRIS IMPLEMENTATION TIMELINE FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 VMM -764 HMM-764/774 (CH-46E) MATSG-42 MV-22 IP Augmentation (VMMT-204) VMM-774MV-22B AD MV-22 Transition UH-1N BRAC JB MDL HMLA-773 (UH-1N) HMLA-773 MATSG-42 FRS IP MATSG-42 FRS IP Aug (UH-1N) Augmentation (UH-1Y) UH-1N LEGACY REFRESHER TRAININGUH-1Y AD UH-1Y Transition BRAC JB MDL HMLA-773 (AH-1W) MATSG-42 FRS IP Augmentation (AH-1W/Z) MATSG-42 FRS IP Augmentation (AH-1Z) 773 AH-1Z AH-1W LEGACY REFRESHER TRAININGAH-1Z AD AH-1Z Transition VMFT-401 MATSG-42 FRS IP Augmentation MATSG-42 JSF IP Augmentation (VMFATs) VMFA-112 (F-18) VMFAT-502 VMFAT-503 FY22/23 JSF (134 & 142)F-35B JSF Integration VMA-134 AV-8B (Yuma) LEGACY TRAINING BRAC HMH-772(-) (CH-53E) JB MDL MATSG-42 FRS IP Augmentation (CH-53E/K) FY26 CH-53K (772)CH-53K CH-53E Utilization VMGR-234/452 (KC-130T)KC-130J KC-130J (234 & 452) ”J” ACQUISITION UNTIL POR COMPLETE UAS 11,12,13 (VMU-4)RQ-7B RQ-7B Integration VMU-4 and VMU-5 Standup and Siting Group 4 Integration TPS-63 MTACS-48 CAC2SC2 MASS-6A/B CAC2S MACS-24 CAC2S MACS-24 GATOR TPS-59 AVPLAN Programmed Planned/In Process Legacy Sustainment 4thMAW Proposed AC Integration BRAC Completion 4-6
    • CURRENT LAYDOWN & FUTURE PLANS RESERVE AVIATION AND HEADQUARTERS UNITS NAS WHIDBEY ISLAND, WA VAQ-129 SAU STEWART ANGB, NY JB McGUIRE/DIX/LAKEHURST (JB MDL) EDWARDS AFB, CA MAG-49 DET B MAG-49 HMM-764 VMGR-452 HMH-772 (-) (Relocate to MCAS Miramar CA and HMLA-773 DET B Re-designate as VMM-764, FY13) MAG-41 DET A (Disestablish) JB ANDREWS, MD CAMP PENDLETON, CA VMR ANDREWS HMLAT-303 SAU HMMT-164 SAU QUANTICO, VA VMU- 4 (-) HMX-1 SAU NS NORFOLK, VA MAG-49 DET D HMM-774MCAS MIRAMAR, CAVMFAT-101 SAUVMM-764 MCAS NEW RIVER, NC(Relocate from Edwards AFB CA, FY13) VMMT-204 SAU HMHT-302 SAU MCAS CHERRY PT, NC MCAS YUMA, AZ VMAT-203 SAU VMFT-401 ROBINS AFB, GA MAG-49 DET A JRB FT WORTH, TX HMLA-773 (-) MAG-41 NEW ORLEANS, LA VMGR-234 HQ, 4th MAW NAS PENSACOLA, FL VMFA-112 MATSG-42 (FSRG Deactivate in FY17) NAS JRB NEW ORLEANS, LA MAG-49 DET C HMLA-773 DET A VMR BELLE CHASSE BLACK = Current Laydown RED = Future Restructuring 4-7
    • CURRENT LAYDOWN & FUTURE PLANS AVIATION SUPPORT UNITS NS GREAT LAKES, IL STEWART ANGB, NY MACG-48 SELFRIDGE ANGB, MI MALS-49 (-) MTACS-48 MWSG-47 (FSRG Deactivate FY-12) MWCS-48 MWSS-471 DET B MCRTC JOHNSTOWN, PA CHEYENNE, WY MWCS-48 DET A MWSS-471 DET A MACS-23 EW/C DET (Realign AC2T (FSRG Deactivate FY17) under MACS-24 Dam Neck, VA) MINNEAPOLIS, MN BATTLE CREEK, MI WESTOVER ARB, MA MWSS-471 (-) MWSS-471 DET A MWSS-472 DET B (FSRG relocate to Selfridge ANGB, (FSRG relocate from Johnstown PA, TBD) MASS-6(-) TBD) MWCS-48 DET B (FSRG New Build FY-12)BUCKLEY AFB, CO MWSS-472 DET A (FSRG relocate from Wyoming PA,MACS-23 (-) (FSRG Deactivate FY12) TBD)MACS-23 TAOC DET (FSRG Deactivate WYOMING, PAFY12) MWSS-472 DET A NAS LEMOORE JB McGUIRE/DIX/LAKEHURST (JB MDL) MWSS-473 DET A MALS-49 DET B MWSS-472 (-) NAS NORFOLK, VACAMP PENDLETON, CA MALS-49 DET DVMU- 4 (-) DAM NECK, VA MACS-24 (-) MACS-24 TAOC DET MACS-24 EW/C DET MCAS MIRAMAR, CA SITE SPT MIRAMAR MWCS-48 DET A (FWD) MCAS YUMA, AZ MASS-6 DET A VMU-4 DET MALS-41 DET A ROBINS AFB, GA MALS-49 DET A EAST COAST SITE TBD MWSS-473 (-) JRB FT WORTH, TX VMU-5 (FSRG New Build FY-12) MALS-41 (-) MACS-24 ATC DET NAS JRB NEW ORLEANS, LA MWSS-473 DET B MALS-49 DET C BLACK = Current Laydown RED = Future Restructuring 4-8
    • Section 5 --- Marine Air Command & Control System (MACCS) PlanMarine Air Command and Control System (MACCS) 5-2MACCS Modernization and Sustainment 5-2Aviation Command and Control (C2) Family of Systems (FoS) 5-3Aviation C2 FoS Concept of Operations 5-4Aviation C2 Agencies / Systems 5-5 Command and Control 5-5 Sensors 5-6 Weapons 5-7Air Command and Control Plan 5-8Marine Tactical Air Command Squadron (MTACS) TACC Plan 5-9Marine Air Support Squadron (MASS) DASC Plan 5-10Marine Air Control Squadron (MACS) TAOC / EWC Plan 5-11Marine Air Control Squadron (MACS) ATC Plan 5-12Low Altitude Air Defense (LAAD) Battalion Plan 5-13 5-1
    • MACCS Modernization and Sustainment Fiscal realities combined with increasing costs of new and rapidly changing technologies will inhibit the Marine Corps’ ability to fully fund transformation initiatives. Due to the high cost and rapid evolution of new technology coupled with a fiscally constrained environment, the Marine Corps cannot afford to approach modernization in a single, prolonged acquisition of revolutionary, leap-ahead technology for air command and control systems. Over the past 15 years, the MACCS has make incremental improvements to a number of systems to provide an effective and reliable MACCS capability to Marines in the fight in Iraq and Afghanistan. Recently, the Common Aviation Command and Control System (CAC2S) successfully demonstrated a capability that provides a combined air/ground common tactical picture by integrating data from multiple stove-piped systems.Marine Air Command and Control System (MACCS) Using these current systems as a baseline, Marine aviation will continue incremental, affordable, and fiscally responsible development and fieldingThe ultimate objective of command and control is to affect the of improved capabilities as technology allows. An incremental approachconduct of military action. Command and control includes will ensure that the MACCS remains aligned and synchronized with theactivities such as gathering and analyzing information, making ground and logistics combat elements in the migration to MAGTF C2 asdecisions, organizing resources, planning, communicating well as remaining synchronized with our joint partners.instructions and other information, monitoring results, andsupervising execution. MACCS modernization is focused on providing the aviation combat element commander with the most capable, effective, and responsive C2The Marine Air Command and Control System provides the ACE capability that technology, resources, and personnel can provide. MACCScommander with the agencies necessary to exercise command modernization and sustainment will focus on three fundamentals:and control (C2) of aviation and air defense assets supporting • Expeditionary multi-function capable C2 centers;MAGTF, naval, and joint operations. These agencies provide the • Seamless MAGTF and joint force integration; andACE commander with the ability to execute the six functions of • Full-spectrum warfare effectiveness.Marine aviation. We will continue to assess our MACCS agencies for the opportunity to transform to multi-mission operation centers to meet the Commandant’sAs one of Marine aviations expeditionary enablers, the MACCS is Vision and Strategy 2025. Success in the future fight requires capabilityrapidly deployable and scalable, ready for MAGTFs of any size and increases in the following areas:mission, from Special Purpose MAGTFs and MEUs to MEF-sizemajor combat operations. To meet the challenges of the future, Deployability – Employ reduced operations and logistics footprint,Marine aviation is aggressively pursuing enhanced capabilities of improved modularity and commonality of equipment with a focus ondigital interoperability; improved modularity and mobility; and Enhanced MAGTF Operations. This is directly in line with theincreased situational awareness. Central to our improvement Commandant’s guidance to “Lighten the MAGTF”.efforts is enhancing the ability of the commander to make rapidand informed decisions using decision support tools and intuitivesituational displays. 5-2
    • Flexibility – Distribute, via multi-function nodes, MACCS functions The Aviation C2 FoS is designed to:across the network; decentralize operations through shared • Be expeditionary and joint;battlespace awareness; integrate open architecture suites with new • Operate in a distributed and network-centric manner; andtechnology and adapt to future environments. • Fuse non- and near-real-time C2, intelligence, sensor and weapons information, and data to achieve shared awareness across the C2Integration – Migrate to MAGTF C2 while enhancing and improving our network.joint C2 capability and interoperability. Significant effort will beinvested to ensure integration and interoperability with ground C2 It will attain rapid decision superiority enabling massed effects across thesystems and various T/M/S aircraft. Initially, the MACCS will act as the battlespace. The key characteristics of the Aviation C2 FoS include:critical link between aviation assets and ground forces being supportedby aviation. Expeditionary - Highly mobile and transportable to support distributed forces with systems that are routinely sea-based to deny enemy accessManpower and Training – Shift from highly-focused, single-function and counter enemy area denial efforts.specialties into broader skill areas. Scalable - Modular and task-organized to provide various functionsAdaptability – Operate afloat, ashore, airborne, and during transitions; dependent on critical mission requirements across the spectrum ofsupporting the Commandant’s guidance to return to our Naval and military operations.expeditionary roots. Multi-mission - Mission-tailored operational centers to perform multipleData Fusion – Correlate real-time, non-real-time, and near-real-time aviation C2 functions, change functions performed over time, providedata from sensors, weapon systems, and C2 systems into a single, task-organized components of all aviation C2 functions concurrently, andshared display. enable the distribution and phasing of control functions across the battlespace.Focus on Aviation CommandAll future enhancements to the MACCS will include focus on the Data & Software Fusion - Fuse data from various sensors and C2 systems“command” aspect of aviation C2. By leveraging technological to provide an integrated tactical display. Near- real and non-real-timeadvancements and innovation to increase our aviation C2 capability, we data will be available throughout the Aviation C2 FoS and shared withensure that the tactical air commander can effectively execute his other C2, weapon, and sensors systems throughout the battlespace.battle command and battle management functions in support of the Shared fused data will provide enhanced battlefield awareness andMAGTF commander. significantly reduce decision making time for commanders. The integrated tactical display will be augmented with an integrated softwareAviation C2 Family of Systems (FoS) application capability enhancing command and control of MAGTF aviation assets.The Aviation C2 FoS is a set of related, scalable, modular systems whichthe ACE can arrange or interconnect in various configurations to Redundant & Survivable - The Aviation C2 FoS will build in redundancyprovide different capabilities. The mix of systems can be tailored to and flexibility to ensure seemless growth of C2 capabilities or theprovide desired capabilities, dependent on the situation or mission degradation of capabilities needed to support phasing ashore, phases ofassigned. an operation, and system casualties for the aviation C2 system, including sensors, communications, and networks. The increased speed and tempo of future operations demands a system that provides the ACE commander with the ability to manage air assets uninterrupted, even if the system is degraded or damaged. 5-3
    • Evolving Digital ACE - Digital & Voice Communications - The Aviation C2 survivability, and self-synchronization resulting in increased efficiency andFoS will be capable of communicating digitally; this capability will effectiveness of available combat power.ultimately extend to all Marine aircraft platforms, as well as to theextensions of the aviation C2 system to include the Tactical Air Control Adaptive & Continually Enhanced – We will meet the challenges of newParties (TACPs). The Aviation C2 FoS will digitally receive, process, and operational environments and emerging joint concepts, relentlessly improvingdisplay air requests; select the aviation asset(s) available to meet the and outpacing enemy capabilities through a spiral process of innovation withinrequest; and digitally transmit the mission data back to the requestor a culture of continuous modernization. A key attribute of the Aviation C2 FoSand the responding platform once assigned – sharing situational modernization efforts will be the migration to common, open C2 and sensorawareness across the network. architecture that facilitates continued adaptation and improvement.The Aviation C2 FoS must have the ability to receive and transmit data Sensor Network Capable - The Aviation C2 FoS will be capable of participatingwith all MAGTF aircraft. By 2020, all units requesting immediate in joint sensor networks for sharing information in a real and near-real timesupport from Marine aviation - whether requesting CAS, assault basis. This capability will be essential to ensure that the Marine Corps is asupport, or any other immediate aviation mission - will be equipped contributor to the Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) operatingwith both the communication means and C2 capabilities to send their concept.immediate mission requests via digital means, augmented by voice ifneeded, to the Aviation C2 FoS. Netted Sensors/Sensor-to-Shooter - The Aviation C2 FoS will provide sensor-to-shooter capability, allowing for rapid response against enemy fixedThe Aviation Digital Interoperability Council is developing a strategy for wing and rotary wing aircraft, UASs, tactical ballistic missiles (TBMs), and cruisedigital interoperability to ensure that all Marine aircraft will have both missile attacks. The networked sensors and sensor-to-shooter capabilities willthe communications means and C2 application capabilities to exchange enable emerging joint concepts, such as integrated fire control (IFC) andsecure digital data information, augmented by voice: engage on remote (EOR). Aviation C2 will contribute to strike operations by• Between aircraft on a common mission (peer-to-peer data providing greater operational reach inland and expanding the netted sensor exchange); network of radars.• Between aircraft and the Aviation C2 FoS (parent-to-child/child-to- parent data exchange); and Aviation C2 FoS Concept of Operations• Between aircraft and all of those requestors who had an aviation mission assigned to them by the Aviation C2 FoS (cross-peer data Aviation C2 Vision - The future MACCS will be organized, trained, and equipped exchange). to deploy and employ networked multi-functional agencies or operationDigital information should be available to troop commanders and facilities (OPFAC). It will be adaptable and capable of optimal functionality inmission commanders embarked in assault support aircraft. Key to this any environment, whether afloat, transitioning ashore, or on the move. Theeffort will be to adjust Marine Corps C4I policies to ensure adherence systems will have a reduced footprint, be lighter, and have greater capabilities,to DISA-mandated NCID T-300 Quality of Service standards for allowing employment throughout the range of military operations. The futurecommunications. systems will be scalable for use at all levels from a SPMAGTF performing a non- combatant evacuation operation (NEO) in a permissive environment to a MEFJoint – The Aviation C2 FoS will be compatible and interoperable with fighting as a part of a joint or combined task force in a MCO. The Aviation C2other services C2 systems and compliant with all joint mandates and FoS will provide the ACE commander with the ability to direct joint andstandards, in accordance with CJCSI 3170.01G. multinational task force air operations, when required, and provide desired tools to assist in command functions. It will have enhanced survivability andNetwork Centric – Through the networking of sensors, decision makers, mobility by reducing the physical size and weight of its components and byand shooters we will achieve shared awareness, increased speed of creating redundancy in all critical functions.command, higher tempo operations, greater lethality, increased 5-4
    • 2015 to 2020 Aviation C2 Concept - Our Aviation C2 concept of with newer components that are widely used across the aviationemployment will utilize C2 operations centers with equipment capable community. The TACC also relies heavily on Theater Battleof being configured from a man-portable version to a full ACE Management Core System (TBMCS) for the production andoperations center. execution of the Air Tasking Order (ATO). Recent and pending upgrades to TBMCS include the ability to dynamically re-task airSensors and weapons will be networked and accessible from any C2 assets, track passengers and cargo, and improved systemoperations center. The Aviation C2 FoS will participate in a collective interoperability through the development of a web servicesdigitally interoperable network to facilitate the generation of a capability. In addition to the recently extended service life of thecommon tactical picture and its dissemination to all operators and TACC’s hard shelters, MTACS was fielded a COC(v)2 to provide antactical agencies. The Aviation C2 FoS will be employed throughout the expeditionary, HMMWV-based facility for the Tactical Airbattlespace from the sea base to the deep battle area, as well as to Commander. For communications, the TACC employs the MRQ-CONUS-based forces providing a reach-back capability. All datalink and 12(v)4 Communications Interface System (CIS) which will beinformation assurance requirements will comply with joint standards. upgraded to the MRQ-13 Communication System (CS) with the fielding of CAC2S Phase 1.Equipment – To the extent possible and when reasonably affordable,common C2 equipment and technologies will incrementally replace the Direct Air Support Center (DASC): The DASC currently performs itsvarious systems used today. Commonality will help to reduce training functions using the MRQ-12(v)4 CIS and a host of stand-alone C2time, improve maintainability, consolidate supply and sustainment, and systems such as AFATDS, C2PC/JTCW, and JRE. With the fielding ofenable cross-training Marines. The goal is to be able to conduct any of CAC2S Phase 1, the DASC will be equipped with a single program ofthe current functions of the MACCS using one suite of equipment with record system that integrates the inputs from the multiple stand-integrated applications. alone systems providing an integrated air/ground picture with access via web-remote to essential systems such as TBMCS. TheAviation C2 Agencies / Systems CAC2S Phase 1 capability provides C2 processing, communications, and facilities that will move and co-locate with the GCE’s FireThe Aviation C2 FoS is generally grouped into C2 Systems, Sensors, and Support Coordination Center.Weapons. Within the C2 Systems group, the MACCS community sub-categorizes systems as they support particular agencies in the same Tactical Air Operation Center (TAOC): The TAOC currently employsway the flying community talks about Type/Model/Series (T/M/S). For the TYQ-23(V)4 Tactical Air Operations Module (TAOM) alongsideexample, the TACC, DASC, or TAOC have particular systems that they the MSQ-124 Air Defense Communications Platform (ADCP) and theemploy. As MACCS modernization moves closer to a common suite of Sector Anti-air Warfare Facility (SAAWF). The TAOM is a moveable,hardware and applications for all C2 agencies, we will have an modular, automated C2 shelter designed to conduct anti-airopportunity to explore the employment of multi-function operational warfare, tactical air control, and surveillance and identificationfacilities – much the way the Joint Strike Fighter will replacing multiple functions for the MAGTF. The TAOM provides the operator with theT/M/S that currently perform related, but different functions. functions of air surveillance, air direction, and air control. The TAOC’s modular concept allows TAOMs to operate in a standalone configuration or to be combined with other TAOMs to increaseCommand and Control capability and redundancy. The TAOC’s modular concept allows the build up or scale down of system capacity without disrupting C2Tactical Air Command Center (TACC): The Communications Data Link operations. However, it is large and requires the use of MaterialSystem (CDLS) provides the primary C2 processing capability for the Handling Equipment to move and emplace.TACC. This system was recently upgraded to replace aging components 5-5
    • Mobile TAOM (MTAOM): The TSQ-269 MTAOM is a hardware Air Traffic Control: The Marine Corps currently employs two types of Airintegration effort consisting of selected components and subassemblies Traffic Control Systems, the Marine Air Traffic Control and Landingof the TYQ-87(V)1 Sector Anti-Air Warfare Facility and other commercial System (MATCALS) and the Air Traffic Navigation Integration andoff-the-self, government off-the-shelf, and non-developmental items to Coordination System (ATNAVICS). MATCALS is a family of systemsmeet the functional capabilities of the TAOM and ADCP. The MTAOM is providing all-weather air traffic control (ATC) services for expeditionarya self-contained, vehicle mounted, suite of processor and digital operations ashore. MATCALS includes expeditionary control towers,communications equipment capable of supporting up to twenty operator navigation aids, surveillance and precision approach radars, andworkstations, supporting both organic and non-organic sensor interfaces, communications systems.and is capable of managing multiple tactical data links. The MTAOMprovides the TAOC with an expeditionary transportable capability when ATNAVICS: The TPN-31A ATNAVICS is replacing the legacy MATCALSused in conjunction with the MRQ-12(V)4 CIS for voice communications. precision approach radar, airport surveillance radar, and the Control andWhen the MTAOM is employed in conjunction with the CAC2S Phase 1 Communications Sub-systems. ATNAVICS is scalable and HMMWV-system, it provides the same capability provided by up four TAOMs and transportable, and requires substantially less airlift (than MATCALS) forone ADCP. Marine Corps Systems Command (MARCORSYSCOM) began intra-theater movement. Upon delivery of a range extension initiativefielding the MTAOM to the operating forces during 4th Qtr, FY11. for the ATNAVICS surveillance radar and an ability to receive and display a data link air picture, Marine aviation can sundown the MATCALS. TheComposite Tracking Network (CTN): The MSQ-143 CTN system is resultant capability will include a fully-HMMWV based, modernized, aircomprised of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) and non-development traffic control system that provides a full range of ATC services fromitem (NDI) subsystems adapted from the USN Cooperative Engagement tower/TACAN services to air control operation at a main airbase.Capability (CEC). The CTN system will interface with C2 systems andsensors to provide the MAGTF and joint task force commanders a METOC: The Meteorological and Oceanographic (METOC) sectionground-based sensor netting solution that correlates sensor provides weather observation and forecast capabilities. The primarymeasurement data (target velocity and position) from local and remote METOC system is the Meteorological Mobile Facility (Replacement)radars into the CEC network. This will increase situational awareness by (METMF (R)). Beginning in FY13, the METMF (R) will be replaced withproviding accurate, composite, real-time surveillance tracks to support the METMF (R) NEXGEN; a highly mobile, fully integrated, FORCENetSea Shield and Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air. compliant, tactical meteorological support system. The system deliversMARCORSYSCOM began fielding CTN to the Marine Air Control relevant, timely METOC products and mission impact assessments via aSquadrons in FY11. common operating picture to the MAGTF and Joint Force.JICO Support System (JSS): The Joint Interface Control Officer (JICO) SensorsSupport System (JSS) was a Joint Program with USAF lead that provided atool set to support the planning, management, and execution of the Ground/Air Task Oriented Radar (G/ATOR): The TPS-80 G/ATOR system isMulti-Tactical Data Link (TDL) Network (MTN). The JSS program was a 3D short/medium range radar designed to detect low observable/ lowcancelled during the 4th Quarter of FY11. While program development radar cross section (LO/LRCS) targets such as cruise missiles, UAS, airno longer exists, there is still a capability gap for a MTN management breathing targets (ABTs), rockets, mortars, and artillery shells. G/ATORcapability. Aviation will explore options of including a TDL network replaces five legacy radar systems and supports air surveillance, firemanagement tool in existing systems in concert with future joint finding, and air traffic control missions. G/ATOR provides fire qualitycapability development efforts. data that supports the integrated fire control concept and the extension of Sea Shield/Sea Strike landward in the littorals. 5-6
    • Long Range Radar: The TPS-59A(V)3 radar is the MAGTF’s only long- The GBAD Initial Capabilities Document (ICD) was signed by therange surveillance radar. The existing configuration of this radar ACMC and identifies gaps and the required capabilities of theaddresses both current and evolving threats in a single sustainable Stinger Missile replacement system. The GBAD ICD identifies thesensor. Given the current capabilities and service life remaining in the primary threat to the MAGTF, to be countered by GBAD, is theTPS-59 radar the Marine Corps does not anticipate the need for new Low Observable/Low Radar Cross Section (LO/LRCS) Unmannedlong range radar until 2025. The Marine Corps will sustain the current Aircraft System (UAS). The secondary threats are: Fixed WingTPS-59 radar system and address diminishing manufacturing resources (FW), Rotary Wing (RW), and Cruise Missiles (CM).and obsolescence to extend the service life. To close the GBAD ICD gaps the long-term vision of Marine CorpsTPS-63B: The TPS-63B radar is a transportable two-dimensional, GBAD is to vehicle mount integrated kinetic (Missile(s) and Gun)medium range, medium altitude, air surveillance radar system. It is and non-kinetic (Directed Energy (DE)) weapons to providedeployed as a tactical gap filler or an early warning radar in support of continuous, on-the-move, low altitude air defense for theair surveillance and air control mission objectives. It is often co- MAGTF. The goal is to protect the maneuver force from LO/LRCSemployed with the TPS-59A(V)3 long range radar for redundancy and UAS and other asymmetric threats throughout the operatingoverlapping radar coverage. This system was first fielded in 1978 and is environment while maintaining the MAGTF expeditionaryin the sustainment phase of its life cycle and will reach the end of capability. To align the long-term vision, the GBAD Capabilitiesservice life in 2020. The TPS-63B will replaced by G/ATOR Increment I, Development Document (CDD) will include the followingAir Defense/Air Surveillance Radar beginning in FY16. capabilities: • Multi-Mission Turret; Gun, DE, Missile(s);Weapons • Open System Architecture for future material solutions; and • Command and Control (C2) of the Joint Engagement SequenceLow Altitude Air Defense (LAAD): The near-term modernization and (JES) on-the-move vice C2 of the JES at the halt.replacement of LAAD equipment involves:• Executing a Joint Service Life Extension Program (SLEP) (with the Employing DE weapons and executing the C2 of the JES on-the- Army) of Stinger Block I Missile starting in 1st Qtr FY12. The SLEP will move will be critical in overcoming the identified GBAD ICD gaps. extend the shelf life of the missile to 2024/2026 and will serve as a The 2010-2012 MIT Lincoln Lab’s Expeditionary High Energy Laser bridge to the future Ground Based Air Defense (GBAD) Weapons (ExHEL) Study indicates that a vehicle mounted ~25kW ExHEL is System; feasible and supports moving forward with the Office of Naval• Fielding a Low Rate Initial Production of 13 Section Leader Vehicles Research (ONR) Future Naval Capabilities (FNC) GBAD on-the- and 50 Fire Unit Vehicles beginning in 1st Qtr FY12; move DE Science and Technology (S&T) Demonstration. This S&T• Developing, sourcing, and fielding a Day/Night Sight to enhance the Demonstration will research and develop DE capabilities in effectiveness of the Stinger Block I Missile: addition to C2 of the JES on-the-move. The ONR Technology• Developing, sourcing, and fielding a Mode 5 IFF capability by 2020 to Oversight Group approved the GBAD DE on-the-move S&T conform to DoD directed fielding requirements. demonstration scheduled for FY13-17. With the successful demonstration of this DE capability, Marine aviation will evaluate, transition, and incorporate this technology into a Program of Record. The planned IOC of the GBAD Weapons System is 2018/2020. 5-7
    • AVIATION COMMAND AND CONTROL PLAN CO-EVOLUTION JOINT Joint C2/Sensors/Weapons CTN CAC2S G/ATOR AN/TPS-59 2025 Marine Corps MACCS SUSTAINMENT MAGTF C2 / SENSORS / WEAPONS CO-EVOLUTION MAGTF/NAVAL 5-8
    • MARINE TACTICAL AIR COMMAND SQUADRON (MTACS) PLAN CURRENT FO RCE: 3 ACT IVE AND 1 RESERVE SQUADRONS FO RCE GO AL: 3 ACT IVE AND 1 RESERVE SQUADRONS (3) MRQ-12 CIS (3) CAC2S CS (2) CDLS (2) CDLS (1) COC V2 (1) COC V2 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY19 FY20 FY21 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4UNIT /LOCAT ION EQUIPMENT MACG-18 FUT MT ACS-18 MRQ-12 CS CDLS 2 COC V2 MACG-28 CP MT ACS-28 MRQ-12 CS CDLS 2 COC V2 MACG-38 MIR MT ACS-38 MRQ-12 CS CDLS 2 COC V2 MACG-48 ILL MT ACS-48 MRQ-12 CS CDLS 2 COC V2 CS - MRQ-12 MODIFIED WIT H CAC2S PHASE 1 COMMUNICAT IONS SYST EM ECP 2 - EACH MT ACS RECEIVES A SECOND CDLSGENERAL NOT E: T RANSIT ION PLAN AS DEPICT ED IS NOT IONAL PENDING ANALYSIS OF OPFOR OPT EMPO AT SYST EM PRODUCT ION T IME 5-9
    • MARINE AIR SUPPORT SQUADRON (MASS) PLAN CURRENT FO RCE:(3) ACT IVEACT IVE AND 1 RESERVE SQDNS 3 AND (1) RESERVE SQUADRONS FO RCE GO AL: 3 ACT IVE AND 1 RESERVE SQDNS (8) MRQ-12 CIS (6) CAC2S CS (2) UYQ-3B DASC(A) IN RESERVES ONLY (2) CAC2S PDS (2) UYQ-3B DASC(A) IN RESERVES ONLY FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4UNIT /LOCAT ION EQUIPMENT MACG-18 FUT MASS-2 MRQ-12* CS CAC2S PDS CAC2S PDS MACG-28 CP MASS-1 MRQ-12 CS CAC2S PDS CAC2S PDS MACG-38 MIR MASS-3 MRQ-12 CS CAC2S PDS CAC2S PDS MACG-48 ILL MASS-6A MA MRQ-12 CS CAC2S PDS CAC2S PDS MASS-6B MIR MRQ-12 CS CAC2S PDS CAC2S PDS UYQ-3B CS - MRQ-12 MODIFIED WIT H CAC2S COMMUNICAT IONS SUBSYST EM ECP CAC2S PDS - DASC FIELDED PHASE 1 CAC2S CAPABILIT Y 5-10
    • MARINE AIR CONTROL SQUADRON (MACS) TAOC/EWC PLANC UR R E N T F O R C E : F O R C E G O A L:3 TAOC & 2 EWC AC TIVE, 2 TAOC R ES ER VE 3 TAOC & 2 EWC AC TIVE, 1 TAOC & 1 EWC R ES ER VE TAOC : (1) TP S -59, (1) TP S -63, (4) TAOM , (2) ADC P , (1) S AAWF , (1) M TAOM ) TAOC : (4) C AC S 2 C S , (1) C AC 2S P DS , (2) M TAOM EWC : (1) TP S -59, (2) TAOM , (1) ADC P , (1) S AAWF , (1) M TAOM (1) C TN, (1) TP S -59, (2) G/ATOR EWC : (3) C AC 2S C S , (1) C AC 2S P DS , (1) M TAOM TP S -73, TP N-22 (1) C TN, (1) TP S -59, (1) G/ATOR F Y11 F Y12 F Y13 F Y14 F Y15 F Y16 F Y17 F Y18 F Y19 F Y20 F Y21 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 UNIT/LOC ATION EQUIP M ENT M AC G-18 F UT M AC S -4 TP S -59 S OF TWAR E TP S -63/G/ATOR G/ATOR C TN TAOM /S AAWF M TAOM P DS M R Q-12 CS M AC G-28 C P M AC S -2 TP S -59 S OF TWAR E TP S -63/G/ATOR G/ATOR C TN TAOM /S AAWF M TAOM P DS M R Q-12 CS M AC G-38 M IR M AC S -1 TP S -59 S OF TWAR E TP S -63/G/ATOR G/ATOR C TN TAOM /S AAWF M TAOM P DS M R Q-12 CS M AC G-48 ILL M AC S -24 TP S -63/G/ATOR G/ATOR C TN TAOM /S AAWF M TAOM P DS M R Q-12 CS TP S -59: UP R ADES TO THE DIGITAL P R OC ES S OR GR OUP AND NEW ELEC TR ONIC S S HELTER AND S OF TWAR E UP GR ADES G/ATOR R EP LAC ES ALL TP S -63 R ADAR S TAOM /S AAWF WILL R EC EIVE S OF TWAR E AND C OTS R EF R ES H 5-11
    • MARINE AIR CONTROL SQUADRON (MACS) ATC PLANC UR R E N T F O R C E :M AC S -1 a nd M AC S -2: 4 ATC DETS P ER M AC S AC TIVE DUTY F O R C E G O A L: M AC S -1 a nd M AC S -2: 3 ATC DETS P ER M AC S -4: 2 ATC DETAC HM ENTS M AC S AC TIVE DUTY 1 ATC DET R ES ER VE M AC S -4: 2 ATC DETAC HM ENTS 1 ATC DET R ES ER VE TP S -73, TP N-22 F Y11 F Y12 F Y13 F Y14 F Y15 F Y16 F Y17 F Y18 F Y19 F Y20 F Y21 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 UNIT/LOC ATION EQUIP M ENT M AC G-18 F UT M AC S -4 TP S -73 TR ANS ITION TO ATNAVIC S G TP N-22 TR ANS ITION TO ATNAVIC S TAC AN TS Q-131 TR ANS ITION TO ATNAVIC S M ETOC NEXGEN M AC G-28 C P M AC S -2 TP S -73 TR ANS ITION TO ATNAVIC S G TP N-22 TR ANS ITION TO ATNAVIC S TAC AN TS Q-131 TR ANS ITION TO ATNAVIC S M ETOC NEXGEN M AC G-38 M IR M AC S -1 TP S -73 TR ANS ITION TO ATNAVIC S G TP N-22 TR ANS ITION TO ATNAVIC S TAC AN TS Q-131 TR ANS ITION TO ATNAVIC S M ETOC NEXGEN M AC G-48 ILL M AC S -24 ATNAVIC S G TAC AN ATNAVIC S R EP LAC ES LEGAC Y M ATC ALS S YS TEM . EAC H AC DU M AC S WILL M AINTAIN ONE LEGAC Y M ATC ALS UNTIL ATNAVIC S R ANGE EXTENS ION IS F IELDED IN F Y 14-16 G= G/ATOR TR ANS ITION B EGINS 5-12
    • LOW ALTITUDE AIR DEFENSE (LAAD) BATTALION PLAN CURRENT FO RCE: FO RCE GO AL: 2ND LAAD BN 143 A-MANPADS Fire Unit Vehicles 3RD LAAD BN 38 A-MANPADS Section Leader Vehicles FY11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 FY 15 FY 16 FY 17 FY 18 FY 19 FY 20 FY 21 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4UNIT /LOCAT ION EQUIPMENT MACG-28 2ND LAAD A-MANPADS Inc 1 1 ST INGER MSL SLEP Stinger / MSL Replacement 2 3 MACG-38 3RD LAAD A-MANPADS Inc 1 1 ST INGER MSL SLEP Stinger / MSL Replacement 2 3NOT E 1: A-MANPADS INCREMENT 1 VEHICLES WILL BE FIELDED SIMULT ANEOUSLY T O BOT H UNIT S.NOT E 2: SERVICE LIFE EXT ENSION T O T HE EXIST ING ST INGER MISSILENOT E 3: IOC FOR T HE ST INGER MISSILE REPLACEMENT IS EST IMAT ED T O OCCUR IN FY18 5-13
    • SECTION 6 --- MARINE UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEM PLANMarine Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Plan 6-2USMC UAS Family of Systems (FoS) Road Map 6-3SUAS (Small UAS) Fielding 6-4STUAS (Small Tactical UAS) Fielding 6-5MCTUAS (Marine Corps Tactical UAS) RQ-7 Shadow & Group-4 Fielding 6-6Marine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron Geo-Location 6-7 6-1
    • MARINE UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEM (UAS) PLANUnmanned aircraft systems increase the lethality and effectiveness of our air- The Marine Corps is a key participant in the joint proof of concept effort forground team by extending our influence over time and space on the battlefield. increasing remote sense-and-avoid capabilities. Successful evaluation of thisThe persistence and reach of our current UAS are key characteristics that provide capability will lead to greater access to airspace in the vicinity of UAS trainingimproved aerial reconnaissance and command and control capability exceeding locations across DoD.that of manned aviation assets. The near future will see these characteristicsexpand to also include OAS, electronic warfare, and assault support. The MAGTF Organization & Manpowerwill directly benefit from improving aviation support as we find new ways to put Organizational changes are providing more flexible and responsive support toour nation’s technologies into the hands of Marines. the MAGTF. Each VMU squadron has been reorganized to provide three RQ-7 detachments to the fleet. In addition to the stand-up of VMU-3 in SeptemberThe rapid expansion of these technologies demands significant adaptation in 2008, the Marine Corps is standing up VMU-4, a reserve UAS squadron, with aorganization, policy, and doctrine within the Marine Corps and naval service. detachment in Yuma and a headquarters in Camp Pendleton. By 2012, eachThese include the addition of personnel and units, new primary MOS fields, and VMU will receive nine STUAS systems and eighty-one active-duty Marines.revision and creation of doctrinal publications and tactics, techniques, andprocedures (TTPs). A UAS Officer Primary Military Occupational Specialty (PMOS) is being* Note: Properly termed “Unmanned Aircraft System” or UAS by joint doctrine, developed. This will permit skilled aviation professionals to bring valuablethe VMU squadrons employing these systems have retained the description of MAGTF expertise to the expanding community as well as provide continuity“Unmanned Aerial Vehicle” squadrons. through retention, development, and integration of their UAS experience. Command staffs and training organizations will now have a source of expertiseConcepts for maximizing effective employment of UAS within the MAGTF. The role ofMarine commanders rely on UAS from every level of our family of systems (FoS) our SNCOs within the UAS field will be expanded into increased operationalto both preserve manned aviation assets as well as shape their battlespace. roles in order to meet the high demand for tactical UAS support.Battalion-level units will continue to use the smallest systems (Group-1) as anorganic aerial reconnaissance and surveillance asset. The VMU squadrons will Platformsemploy the larger and more complex systems (Groups 3 and 4) via a common Current initiatives for development and procurement of UAS platformsGround Control Station (GCS) architecture to provide task-organized support to include:the MAGTF. The RQ-7B Shadow will be replaced by a larger Group-4 system with - SUAS (Small UAS) requirements continue to be met by joint Group-1greater capabilities that include targeting, strike, intelligence collection, electronic programs such as RQ-11 Raven and Wasp.warfare, data networking, and communications relay. - STUAS (Small Tactical UAS) will IOC in 2013. The RQ-21 Integrator (a Group- 3 system) will replace ISR services currently provided by Boeing/Insitu usingCapabilities the smaller Group-2 sized Scan Eagle system.Aerial reconnaissance is currently supported with electro-optical and infrared - MCTUAS (Marine Corps Tactical UAS) requirement is currently being(EO/IR) full-motion video data that is fed to the warfighter via secure network or supported by RQ-7B Shadow (a Group-3 system), but will be replaced in thedown-linked via systems such as VideoScout and One System Remote Video FY18 timeframe by a larger Group-4 system.Terminal (OSRVT). - The future Group-4 MCTUAS will provide a highly capable and expeditionary system with strike, ISR, and EW capabilities.Kinetic and non-kinetic EW capabilities will be incorporated into the RQ-7B - Government-owned / contractor operated Cargo Resupply UAS (CRUAS) willShadow and its replacement. Command and control is currently being be fielded for a Military User Assessment (MUA) in November 2011 andaugmented through a radio relay capability with the RQ-7B Shadow. The provide logistical support to company-sized forces in the most forwarddevelopment of advanced payloads such as those demonstrated by Collaborative positions in a combat zone. A follow-on program of record will be evaluatedOnline Reconnaissance Provider Operationally Responsive Attack Link based on the results of the MUA and coordinated with the joint community for(CORPORAL), Wide Focal Plan Array Camera (WFPAC) , Firefly, and Software advances and development of a joint cargo UAS capability.Reprogrammable Payload (SRP) will provide additional capability options to the 6-2
    • USMC UAS FAMILY OF SYSTEMS ROAD MAP 2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2013 2014 2014 2015 2015 2016 2016 2017 2017 2018 2018 2019 2020 2021 2021 2022 2022 2023 2023 2024 MCTUAS MEF/MEB FORCE APPLICATION & BATTLESPACE AWARENESS: (All Wx , 1350 nm radius , 240+knots , 10+hrs TOS) Organic to VMU - EA, Persistent-Strike, RSTA (FMV,SAR/GMTI, WAAS), Comm/Data relay, RQ-7B Shadow Objective 13 systems POR: Group-4 ICD JROCM 273-05 (3 per VMU + 1 T&E) UGCS Weapons SRP CRUAS LOGISTICS 350 nm radius 240+knots 1500 lbs payload Immediate CARGO UAS POR: CARGO RESUPPLY UAS (CRUAS) IOC STUAS: MEB/MEU BATTLESPACE AWARENESS (50 nm radius 80+kts 10+hrs TOS) Organic to VMU - Laser Designator , ISR and TA, FMV + SIGINT - Comm/Data Relay ISR Contract: Scan Eagle RQ-21A Integrator Objective 32 systems IOC BATTALION (GCE) BATTLESPACE AWARENESS SUAS: Organic to Battalion - Laser Pointer, RSTA (FMV) EO/IR, Comm/Data Relay RQ-11B Raven Objective 461 systems POR: SUAS Familiy of SystemsIOC OEF/OIF UUNS Wasp (not yet a POR) 6-3
    • SUAS FIELDING CURRENT FO RCE: GO AL: 108 X RQ-11 RAVEN SYST EMS (I MEF) 55 SYST EMS IN MARCENT 109 X RQ-11 RAVEN SYST EMS (II MEF) 314 SYST EMS IN OPERAT IONAL FORCES 42 X RQ-11 RAVEN SYST EMS (III MEF) 17 SYST EMS T RAINING & T EST ING 0 X RQ-11 RAVEN SYST EMS (MARFORRES) 75 SYST EMS IN MARFORRES 69 X RQ-11 RAVEN SYST EMS (MARSOC) 17 X RQ-11 RAVEN SYST EMS (T RAINING) 81 x RQ-11 RAVEN SYST EMS (MARCENT ) FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 FIELDING S CHEDULE 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 UNIT/LO CATIO N TO TAL SYSTEMSI MEF 108 0II MEF 109 0III MEF 42 0MARFORRES 75 0MARSOC 55 25T ECOM & MCSC 17 0MARCENT 55 10 UAS FIELDING FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 RQ-11 RAVEN SYST EMS 461 461 461 461 461 461 461 461 461 461 AIR VEHICLES 1383 1383 1383 1383 1383 1383 1383 1383 1383 1383Note: MARFORRES Raven systems will be reallocated from active units. 6-4
    • STUAS FIELDING PLAN Goal: (3) AC SQDN x (9) RQ-21 SYSTEMS/DETSCURRENT: N/A (2) RC SQDN X (9) RQ-21 SYSTEMS/DETS (1) TEST AND EVAL SQDN X (2) RQ-21 SYSTEMS STUAS FIELDING FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 SCHEDULE 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 UNIT VMU-1 VMU-2 VMU-3 VMU-4 VMU-5 T&E UAS INVENTORY FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 SYSTEMS 2 (EOC) 2 5 12 19 26 33 40 47 47 47 AIR VEHICLES 10 10 25 60 95 130 165 200 235 235 235 6-5
    • MCTUAS (RQ-7B SHADOW & GROUP-4) FIELDING CURRENT: (3) AC SQDN GO AL: (3) AC SQDN x (3) MCT UAS (GROUP-4) SYST EMS (1) RC SQDN (2) RC SQDN X (3) MCT UAS (GROUP-4) SYSYEMS (1) T &E SYST EM (1) T EST & EVAL SQDN X (1) MCT UAS (GROUP-4) SYST EM FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 TRANS ITION S CHEDULE 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 UNIT/LO CATIO N RQ -7 SYSTEM # VMU-1 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 T wentynine Palms #1 #3 #12 VMU-2 Cherry Point #2 #6 #13 VMU-3 (1) T wentynine Palms #11 #4 #7 VMU-4 Yuma #10 Camp Pendleton #8 Camp Pendleton #9 VMU-5 T BD #14 T BD #15 T BD #16 DEPLOYED OCONUS #8 (OEF) #9 (OEF) #5 (OEF) NAVAIR T &E Patuxent River #5(1) VMU 3 will move to Marine Corps Base Hawaii Kaneohe Bay FY14 UAS FIELDING FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19-FY21 RQ-7B SHADOW SYST EMS 11 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 10 1 AIR VEHICLES 44 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 40 4 GROUP 4 UAS SYST EMS 3 9 6-6
    • MARINE UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE SQUADRON GEO-LOCATION AC/RC2021 1 1 1 2 3/22020 1 1 1 2 3/22019 1 1 1 2 3/22018 1 1 1 2 3/2 MCAS Cherry Point2017 1 1 1 2 3/2 MCB Twentynine Palms2016 1 1 1 2 3/22015 1 1 1 2 3/2 1st MAW2014 1 1 1 2 3/2 4th MAW2013 1 2 2 3/22012 1 2 2 3/22011 1 2 1 3/1 0 1 2 3 4 5 **Basing plans are subject to change and further environmental review** 6-7
    • SECTION 7 --- MARINE AVIATION WEAPONS AND MUNITIONS PLANJoint Air to Ground Missile (JAGM): The JAGM (US Army lead APKWS provides increased kills over the more expensive and limitedservice) will replace the aging inventory of HELLFIRE, TOW and inventory of guided missiles, while the small warhead size minimizesMaverick missile systems. The weapon will utilize a tri-mode seeker collateral damage. APKWS successfully passed Milestone C and will(semi-active laser (SAL), millimeter wave (MMW) radar, and imaging IOC on the AH-1W and the UH-1Y in FY12. APKWS has beeninfrared (IIR)) and multi-mode warhead to defeat hardened, approved for a Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD)armored, and non-traditional stationary and moving targets. JAGM with the Air Force. The JCTD will demonstrate APKWS utility on AV-8will provide enhanced stand-off, effectiveness, and all-weather and A-10 in FY12-FY13. Funding is in place to integrate APKWS oncapability. The multi-service rotary and fixed-wing missile will IOC on F/A-18A-D by 2013.AH-1Z in FY17. Joint service threshold platforms include MH-60R,F/A-18E/F, and AH-64D. GAU-21 Common Defensive Weapon System (CDWS): The GAU-21 enhances the defensive fire capability for the assault support andAGM-114 HELLFIRE: A series of HELLFIRE product improvements utility platforms with improved reliability, lethality, and rate of fire.provide interim measures to address capability gaps that JAGM will This weapon system provides commonality all platforms by replacingclose when fielded. While the AGM-114M is no longer in the aging XM-218 and GAU-16 machine guns in the inventory.production, it remains in use in current operations. The AGM-114N Legacy .50 caliber weapons are no longer in production and haveHELLFIRE retains the “M” model’s fragmentation capability and declining safety and reliability records. The GAU-21 is currentlyprovides a thermobaric capability with improved blast/impulse and fielded on the UH-1Y and CH-53D and is being fielded on the CH-53E.enhanced lethality across the non-traditional target set. Trajectory- Prototype development for MV-22 and CH-53K will complete in FY12shaping software provides a flatter trajectory for the AGM-114N-5 with procurement beginning in FY13.for a near horizontal impact and better penetration on specifictarget sets. The AGM-114K-2A incorporates a steel fragmentationsleeve on the AGM-114K shaped-charge warhead. The AGM-114P- Small Diameter Bomb II (SDBII): The Small Diameter Bomb (SDB)2A is the primary weapon on the KC-130J Harvest HAWK. The AGM- Increment II is the second increment of a Miniature Munitions (MM)114K, K-2A, N, and P-2A variant missiles will remain in production weapons capability. The first increment - the SDB Increment I All-through the transition to the JAGM. The AGM-114R, in development Up Round (AUR) - is a 250-pound class, precision-guided, all-weatherby the US Army, incorporates common capabilities of all AGM-114 munition that provides increased stowed kills per sortie. SDBvariants into one missile. AGM-114R will field for the US Army in Increment II leverages SDB I and will provide the USMC F-35B/CFY14. Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) with a standoff attack capability outside of point defenses against fixed and moving targets. SDB Increment II will utilize a tri-mode seeker (SAL, MMW, IIR) and data link toAdvanced Precision Kill Weapon System (APKWS): APKWS will provide additional capability for the F-35 as an effective, day/night,provide a fiscally responsible solution to fill a capability gap between adverse weather munition with a greater standoff capability. IOC forcostly anti-armor precision-guided munitions and unguided general- the SDB II on the F-35B/C is currently FY18, but will be influenced bypurpose rockets. APKWS adds a semi-active laser seeker to the the JSF master schedule.currently-fielded 2.75-inch rocket system. The APKWS guidance andcontrol section mates with existing rocket components, providinglow cost, mid-range weapon well-suited for the counterinsurgencyoperations. 7-1
    • Direct Attack Moving Target Capability (DAMTC): The DAMTC is the Harvest HAWKfollow-on competitive acquisition program to the Rapid DeploymentCapabilty (RDC) effort which resulted in the Dual-Mode Laser Guided AGM-114P-2A HELLFIRE: The AGM-114P-2A is an improved AGM-Bomb (DMLGB) and Laser Joint Direct Attack Munition (LJDAM). The 114K-2A which provides the Harvest HAWK KC-130J an off-axis high-LJDAM is the material solution selected for the DAMTC program. DAMTC altitude capability. AGM-114P-2A HELLFIRE fielded on Harvestprovides a precision-guided GPS/INS and SAL seeker-capable weapon HAWK in 2010 and has been successfully employed in OEF.designed to counter the moving target threat. IOC is 2nd Quarter FY12. Stand-off Precision Guided Munition (SOPGM): SOPGM is aLaser-Guided 5” Rockets: The laser-guided 5” rocket is a proposed modular system which includes the Griffin and Viper Strike (VS)weapons program which would enhance the current inventory of 5.0” missiles. Griffin and VS are complementary weapons providingZuni rockets with a laser capability. Much like the APKWS, the Laser- flexibility with different launch signatures, employment envelopes,Guided 5” rockets will involve placing a laser seeker onto existing Zuni and warhead capacities. SOPGM uses common launch tubes forrocket motors and warheads, providing an excellent, low cost, mid-range both missiles which interface with the Battle Management Systemweapon. By using the existing stockpile of Zuni motors, warheads and (BMS) for missile programming, target hand-off and launch.the LAU-10 launcher, the fixed-wing warfighter will be able to capitalizeon a low-cost/increased Ph/low-collateral damage weapon system. This Griffin Missile System: The Griffin utilizes GPS/INS and SALsystem enable increased kills per sortie, and provide a better weapon-to- guidance. Capabilities of the Griffin missile system include atarget match against soft/moving target sets, preserving the high cost demonstrated off-axis shot capability and height-of-burst fuzing withPGMs for hard target sets. Pending funding, a laser-guided 5” rocket a blast-fragmentation warhead. Griffin was fielded on Harvest HAWKprogram will follow completion of the 2.75” guided rocket programs in 2010 and has been successfully employed in OEF.currently in development. Viper Strike: Viper Strike (VS) evolved from the Army’s Brilliant Anti- Armor (BAT) munition and is operational on Army SOCOM aircraft.MV-22 Osprey Interim Defensive Weapon System (IDWS): Marine VS is an off-axis glide weapon utilizing GPS/INS and SAL guidance.aviation is integrating an all-aspect, belly-mounted IDWS into the MV-22. The small (3 pound) shaped charge warhead provides a precisionThe system is designed to provide all-quadrant suppressive fires and is low-collateral damage weapon for use in cluttered urbanoperated by the crew chief/gunner from the aircraft cabin. The gunner environments. VS is scheduled to field on Harvest HAWK in FY12.uses a hand controller in conjunction with a video screen to control theweapon. The IDWS consists of a weapon turret, EO/IR sensor, gunnerstation, and associated weapons control/motor control units. A six-barrel7.62mm GAU-17 is mounted in the weapon turret in the aft hellhole andthe EO/IR sensor ball is mounted in the forward hellhole. The IDWS isprocured as a mission kit, easily transferable from one MV-22 to another. 7-2
    • SECTION 8 --- AIRCRAFT SURVIVABILITY EQUIPMENT PLANMarine Assault Support Aircraft Survivability Equipment (ASE) Plan 8-2Marine Assault Support ASE Roadmap 8-3Marine Fixed-Wing ASE Plan 8-4Marine Fixed-Wing ASE Roadmap 8-5Marine Fixed-Wing OSA Plan 8-6 8 -1
    • MARINE ASSAULT SUPPORT ASE PLANRotary Wing/Tiltrotor ASE: CH-46:All forward-deployed assault support aircraft are 100% equipped with TTP: Reevaluate for new systemsupgraded missile warning systems that are able to provide unguided NEAR TERM: Upgrade MWS to B(V)2, Complete FF bucket installs. BeginHostile Fire Indication (HFI) and Countermeasure Dispensing System installation of IRMWS and DIRCM Jamhead. Develop and install advanced(CMDS). ASE suite controller. – CONUS aircraft upgrades ongoing, with priority given to MID TERM: None deploying units LONG TERM: None • Ongoing efforts to complete MWS sensors upgrade to latest B(V)2 configuration (Improved Detection (Pd) in cluttered CH-53: environments) with HFI TTP: Reevaluate for new systems • Estimate completion of B(V)2 HFI CONUS MWS upgrade, FY- NEAR TERM: MWS software drop OFP 30.24, FF Flares development 13 underway. Additional FF dual dispenser development ongoing. InstallationAdvanced ASE suite of IRMWS and DIRCM Jamhead ongoing. Implement VDE Phase I solution – Priority given to most-vulnerable aircraft via CSU. • CH-53E& CH-46E: Improve MWS, CMDS and install DIRCM MID TERM: Upgrade MWS to B(V)2, FF ALE development & Install. • Improvements began Nov 08 OCONUS and are ongoing Complete installation of IRMWS and DIRCM Jamhead. Develop and install Advanced ASE suite controller & SMFCD. – Expedite all other assault support aircraft LONG TERM: Complete installation of IRMWS and DIRCM Jamhead & HFI. • H-1, V-22 and KC-130: Improve MWS, CMDS and develop light weight DIRCM KC-130: • Improvements for MWS and CMDS began Nov 08 for MEU squadrons TTP: Reevaluate for new systemsMV-22: NEAR TERM: MWS software drop OFP 30.24, DECM mods ongoing for KC- 130T. FF Flare efforts ongoing for T and J.TTP: Reevaluate for new systems MID TERM: Upgrade MWS to B(V) 2, Potential for IRMWS and DIRCMNEAR TERM: MWS software drop OFP 30.24, FF Flares development Jamhead.complete. FF Buckets installs ongoing. LONG TERM: Install IRMWS and DIRCM Jamhead.MID TERM: Upgrade MWS to B(V)2 HFI, Complete FF Installation.Develop and install advanced ASE suite controller. Chaff/Flares:LONG TERM: Install IRMWS and DIRCM Jamhead. TTP: Reevaluate techniques for advanced threats, future AOR NEAR TERM: MJU-57 now available for (KC-130), Testing MJU-50/206 forH-1: near term fielding. MID TERM: Evaluating foreign multi-spectral device for USMC use.TTP: Reevaluate for new systems LONG TERM: Develop techniques for using flares and DIRCM for imagingNEAR TERM: Upgrade MWS to B(V) 2 HFI threatsMID TERM: Develop and install advanced ASE suite controller. NEAR TERM: Present MID TERM: FY13-14LONG TERM: Develop and install IRMWS and DIRCM. Develop visually LONG TERM: FY15-18 8-2degraded environment solution.
    • MARINE ASSAULT SUPPORT ASE ROADMAP Present FY13-14 FY15-18 MJU-32/49 MJU-57 MJU-66/67 (Flare) (Flare) (Flare)IRCM AN/ALE-47 Forward Firing ICMD (Flares)AH-1W/ZUH-1Y/N AAR-47 B(V)2 AAR-47 B(V)2 JATAS AAR-47A(V)2 Clutter Improvement HFI Joint IR MWS CH-46ECH-53E/K AN/ALQ-144A/B AN/ALQ-144C CIRCM Sand Filter Small Aircraft IRCM MV-22 Common IRCM DoN LAIRCMKC-130J/T AN/ALQ-157 Large Aircraft IRCM w/ IR MWS R-129/R-144 ICMD (Chaff)RFCM (Chaff)AH-1W/Z AN/APR-UH-1Y/N 39A/B(V)2 AN/APR-39A/B (V)X Improved RWR CH-46E RWR AN/APR-39 DV2 Digital RWRCH-53E/K MV-22 KC-130J AN/ALR-56M (Only) AH-64KC-130J/T Embedded in Embedded in Laser AN/AVR-2A IR MWS AAR-47A/B(V)2 Warning Limited suppression built into aircraft Pursuing Infrared Suppression System Retrofit existing ACFT and IR design AH-1W, AH-1Z, UH-1Y and MV-22 (IRSS) for CH-46E. Analyzing KC-130J and design suppression into new the CH-53K design for potential builds Suppression suppression solutions 8-3
    • MARINE FIXED-WING ASE PLANFixed-Wing ASE: EA-6B:Fixed-wing aircraft are 100% equipped with defensive ECM systems,decoy dispensers and RF warning systems. TTP: Reevaluate for new systems NEAR TERM: Upgrading to ALE-47 counter measure systems.Advanced ASE suite MID TERM: Explore advanced jamming PODs. – Priority given to most vulnerable aircraft LONG TERM: None. • F/A-18 and AV-8B: Upgrade CMDS to ALE-47 configuration and explore DRFM. – All platforms are evaluating mission data files for maximum F-35B: effectiveness. TTP: Continue development of TTPs NEAR TERM: Evaluate for DRFM.F/A-18: MID TERM: Advance Countermeasures development. LONG TERM: None.TTP: Reevaluate for new systemsNEAR TERM: Upgrade shore-based FA-18’s with ASPJ. Chaff/Flares:MID TERM: Replacing ALQ-126B with APSJ for land based and ALQ-214for TAI squadrons. TTP: Reevaluate techniques for advanced threats, future AORLONG TERM: None. NEAR TERM: Reevaluating all Mission Data files for most effective dispense patterns.AV-8B: MID TERM: Evaluating Foreign Multi-Spectral device for USMC use. LONG TERM: Develop techniques for using flares and DIRCM for imagingTTP: Reevaluate for new systems threats.NEAR TERM: Install ALE 47.MID TERM: Continue ALE-47 installs. Sustain ALR-67V2. Explore upgrade to ALR-67V3 and incorporation of ALQ-165 / ASPJ.LONG TERM: Complete ALE-47 integration. Explore feasibility of replacing ALQ-126B with DRFM. NEAR TERM: Present MID TERM: FY13-14 LONG TERM: FY15-18 8-4
    • MARINE FIXED-WING ASE ROADMAP Present FY13-14 FY15-18 AN/ALE- MJU-32/49/63/65 ICMD 39/47 (Flare) (Flare)IRCM F/A-18 DRFM AN/ALQ-126B ASPJ (Block I IDECM) (Block IV IDECM) AV-8B EA-6B ALQ-126B and ALQ-162 imbedded F-35B in ALQ-164 (Sta. 4 only AV-8B)UC-35DUC-12W ALQ-99 ALQ-218 (ICAP II) (ICAP III) C-20G AAQ-24V R-129/R-144 ALE-50/55RFCM (Chaff) (Currently Navy Hornets)F/A-18AV-8B AN/ALR-67V(2) AN/ALR-67V(3) (F/A-18 and AV-8B) (Currently Navy Hornets)EA-6BF-35B F-35B Distributed Aperture System (Only) AH-64 (F-35B)Laser None Warning Suppression and signature AV-8B and EA-6B not currently IR information classified for F/A-18 suppressed. and F-35B.Suppression 8-5
    • OSA ASE PlanOperational Support Airlift (OSA) ASE:Select OSA aircraft are equipped with defensive ECM systems, andmissile warning systems. ASE will be installed on all UC-12W, UC-35Dand C-20G to counter man-portable surface-to-air infrared missilethreats.UC-35D:TTP: Continued use of current TTP.NEAR TERM:4th MAW 1 x reserve UC-35D ASE installs competed FY11MID TERM: Acquisition of AAR 57/ALE 47 system forremaining 4 active component UC-35D aircraft.LONG TERM: Sustainment and upgrade of ASE systems.C-20G:TTP: None.NEAR TERM: Install AN/AAQ 24 Nemesis IRCM solution FY-11LONG TERM: Sustainment and upgrade of ASE system.UC-12W:TTP: Development of TTP.MID TERM: Acquire and integrate 3rd ALE-47dispenser, integrateforward firing kinematic flare retrofit for 6 x Block 1 aircraft..LONG TERM: Acquire remaining UC-12W with three dispenserconfiguration. NEAR TERM: Present MID TERM: FY13-14 LONG TERM: FY15-18 8-6
    • SECTION 9 --- TACTICAL AIR CONTROL PARTY PLANTACP Manpower and Doctrine Update 9-2Contract Close Air Support 9-3TACP Equipment Update 9-4TACP Manning Update 9-6 9-1
    • TACTICAL AIR CONTROL PARTY MANPOWER AND DOCTRINE UPDATEManpower Tactical Air Control Party Instructor (TACPI)Due to aviation integration requirements, the USMC has increased the Tactical Air Control Party Instructor (TACPI) is a SNCO or Officernumber of Joint Terminal Attack Controllers (JTACs) and begun the graduate of the MAWTS-1 Air Officer Course who hasproduction of Joint Fires Observers (JFOs) to provide terminal attack been certified a TACPI by the Commanding Officer of MAWTS-1. Thecontrollers at each maneuver company and a qualified Joint Fires TACPI has completed the transformation from an individual trained inObserver at the platoon level. The resulting increase of JTACs and terminal attack control to an experienced aviation integrator andproduction of JFOs allows aviation’s precise firepower to be employed aviation integration training manager.throughout the distributed battlefield. (1) Each assigned regimental and MEU Air Officer shall attend the AirThe 2012 Uncompensated Review Board’s (URB) approval of three Officer Course and be a certified TACPI. At the regimental and MEUForward Air Controllers (FACs) / three JTACs per battalion (BN) with level, TACPIs shall supervise the development and implementation ofan assigned secondary MOS and career path for JTACs, coupled with subordinate unit collective and individual aviation integration trainingthe decision to provide JFOs to the platoon level defines the path and shall facilitate the training and evaluation of adjacent units.forward for the BN TACP. (2) The TACPI fulfills the JTACE and JFOE requirements set forth in the JCAS AP MOAs and shall conduct 18-month evaluations for JTACEs/JTACs/JFOs within Marine Corps units. Due to the graduateGround Board 1-10 approved the movement of all GCE 0861 JTAC level training and education of a USMC TACPI, the Joint requirementstructure, less LAR and RECON, to the artillery regiments. The for one year of operational experience as a qualified JTAC is waived.Division FSC will now be responsible for preparation and sustainmenttraining for all non-FAC JTACs within the GCE. Doctrine Update Assignment of Aviation Officers as Air Officers and Forward Air Controllers, MCO 1301.25C Order updated to include recommendations from Ground Board 2-10 requiring all Regimental and MEU Air Officers to attend the MAWTS-1 Air Officer Course to become a TACPI. Additional requirement added for aviators who serve at the division level to have previously served a tour as a 7502 FAC and/or Air Officer. LINE 7: JAVELIN MISSILE 9-2
    • TACTICAL AIR CONTROL PARTY AND CONTRACT CLOSE AIR SUPPORT Contract Close Air Support (CCAS) USMC Fire Support Team, OEF As the first service in the world to employ Contract Close Air Support with ordnance, the Marine Corps has forged the way with a cost effective solution to the increased JTAC production/throughput demands on Offensive Air Support available from the fleet. The current annual contract funds approximately 400 hours which provides direct support to Expeditionary Warfare Training Groups Pacific and Atlantic. CCAS Vehicles are armed with Laser Guided Training Rounds (LGTR) and MK-76s which support 1000 level Training and Readiness codes in the production of JTACs and FACs. Future CCAS capabilities will include Night Vision, Full Motion Video (FMV) downlink and Digitally Aided CAS (DACAS).Doctrine Update ContinuedTactical Air Control Party Training and Readiness ManualNAVMC 3500.42A signed 13 May 2011, establishes Core CapabilityMission Essential Tasks (MET) for the TACP. Additionally, it providestasking for formal schools preparing personnel for service in theMarine Corps commands.Tactical Air Control Party Tactical Standard Operating Procedures(TACP TACSOP)Signed 23 May 2011, This manual establishes standard Tactics,Techniques and Procedures (TTPS) for planning and execution withinUSMC Tactical Air Control Parties (TACPs). It is based on professionalknowledge and experience and is grounded in doctrine. It provides abasis for the development of efficient and sound operationalprocedures. It is not intended to stifle individual initiative, but rather CCAS Alpha Jet configured with LGTRs and MK-76sto aid unit aviation integration personnel throughout the spectrum oftheir responsibilities. 9-3
    • TACTICAL AIR CONTROL PARTY EQUIPMENTEquipmentIn 2002 and 2005, Urgent Universal Need Statements (UUNS) were submittedrequesting the most current equipment available to support the deployedTACP teams. Subsequent to the second UUNS, the Marine Corps EquipmentReview Group developed a capability set (equipment) for all Marine CorpsTACPs based on the requirements defined in the UUNS. This action providedthe basis for standardizing, expanding and institutionalizing the TACP suitethroughout the Marine Corps.The equipment within the TACP suite is separated into three capability areas;target location, designation and handoff (TLDH); situational awareness andnight vision; and communications.Capability: Target Location, Designation and Handoff System (TLDHS) Capability: Situational Awareness and Night VisionTLDHS Blk II Strikelink AN/PVS-17Strikelink is the software that runs on a rugged computer tablet that enablesthe Forward Air Controller/Joint Terminal Attack Controller/Joint Fires The AN/PVS-17 provides extended range night vision capability. It is issued asObserver (FAC/JTAC/JFO) the ability to digitally communicate with Advanced a component of the Vector 21.Field Artillery Tactical Data System (AFATDS), Naval Fire Control System (NFCS), Thermal Laser Spot Imager (TLSI)Mortar Fire Control System (MFCS), the AV-8B, F/A-18, F-16 (block 30, 40 and The Kollsman TLSI with Enhanced Targeting Sight provides the capability to50), A-10, Direct Air Support Center (DASC) and Link-16 enabled strike aircraft. see the laser spot generated by the FAC/JTAC’s laser designator or a self-StrikeLink also enables the DASC to be digitally interoperable with VMF- lasing aircraft as well as providing thermal imaging capability. Fielding iscapable platforms. StrikeLink is integrated with Precision Strike Suite-Special complete.Operations Forces (PSS-SOF) software and video downlink software that arealso loaded on the ruggedized computer. Block II began fielding in Dec 07 and Thermal Imageris approximately 90% complete. The Kollsman Long Range Thermal Imager provides the FAC/JTAC a long range target location capability for both day and night operations. Fielding toCommon Laser Range Finder (CLRF)/Vector 21 the operating forces is complete.The Vector 21 (which is fielded with a Defense Advanced GPS Receiver andPVS-14) is a laser range finder that can provide a target location within 50m, Video Scout (VS)day and night. The Vector 21 began fielding in 2005 and is 100% fielded. VS is a system procured in response to an UUNS and further expanded based on DoD ISR Task Force efforts. It provides the capability to view near-real-Portable Laser Designator Rangefinder (PLDR) time video feed from unmanned aircraft systems or aircraft equipped withThe PLDR replaced the interim laser designator, the Ground Laser Target targeting pods. The system has the capability to record (and laterDesignator II, beginning in January 08. The PLDR provides a laser designation manipulate) video feeds and contains a map based video recall features whilecapability out to 5000m at a reduced weight than previous laser equipment. being fully self-contained (terminal, receiver and antenna all in one piece ofRedistribution of PLDRs and GLTD IIs will continue to ensure units have a laser equipment vice numerous cable connections). The Video Scout will replacedesignation capability until production can increase to expected rates. The the ROVER in the TACP suite. Systems are operational in OEF and fielding issystem is currently 71% fielded. currently at 76% completion. 9-4
    • TACTICAL AIR CONTROL PARTY EQUIPMENTCapability: Communications Future InitiativesAN/PRC-117F Remote Video Viewing Terminal (RVVT)Primary TACP radio. Provides UHF, VHF and SatCom capability. Ongoing fielding POM 10 initiative. Forward Air Controllers have identified the need for athroughout the Marine Corps. smaller, hand-held variant of the VideoScout system that is man-portableAN/PRC-117G and optimized for 72-hour dismounted patrols. The RVVT Program ofLimited distribution radio. Provides wireless, high-bandwidth communications,enabling applications such as streaming video, simultaneous voice and data feeds, Record will focus on developing a smaller, lighter, and less-complex ISRcollaborative chat, and connectivity to secure networks. Ongoing fielding terminal to be used by both FACs and JTACs. Full rate productionthroughout the Marine Corps. scheduled for first quarter of FY 13.AN/PRC-152 Lightweight DesignatorFY10 initiative. Replaces the PRC-148s and gives the FAC and JTAC the same tactical Operating forces have identified a need for a light-weight designatorradio fielded to the maneuver elements. Ongoing fielding throughout the Marine and daytime marking system. Current systems are utilized in staticCorps. locations or on forward operating bases and are too large and complex forAN/PRC-150 foot-mobile patrols. Currently seeking off-year FY12 initiative.Provides HF capability utilized for tactical air/helicopter request nets. Ongoingfielding throughout the Marine Corps. TLDHS/Strikelink Combined initiative with Marine Corps Systems Command, Marine CorpsDual-channel headsetProvides FACs/JTACs the ability to monitor 2 channels and keep hands free to Combat Development Command Fires Maneuver Division, HQMC Aviationoperate other fire support equipment. Ongoing fielding throughout the Marine and MAWTS-1 to redefine the Tactical Air Control Party (TACP) Family ofCorps. Systems (FoS) into equipment suites that will support both the static/mounted Fire Support Team (FiST) as well as the dismounted JTACEquipment SummaryThe planned distribution of the TACP suite is to all FACs and JTACs in infantry, tank, with smaller lighter target location, data handoff, video downlink andLAR and reconnaissance battalions, and to MARSOC. Supporting establishment situational awareness enhancing capability.schoolhouses will receive varying quantities of the equipment within the suite basedon student ratios and plans of instruction. In many cases the operating forces, whilethey have some or all of the TACP suite components, have not grouped theequipment to provide the TACP suite capability. By distinguishing a governing Table Marine Joint Terminal Attack Controllerof Assignable Materiel Control Number for the TACP suite and identifying itscomponents in the Total Force Structure Management System, the operating forceswill have the means to group and account for the components within their T/Es. Thecurrent requirement is for 332 suites of equipment.Marine Corps Systems Command (MCSC) has created a TACP Family of Systems(FOS) Overarching Integrated Product Team (OIPT) to provide an open forum forinformation exchange, integration and coordination of support for the TACP FOS toensure efficiency in delivery and adequate support to TACP users in the field. TheOIPT is designed to promote open communication and function in a spirit ofteamwork, to align the application of resources, and establish priorities in order toeffectively and efficiently sustain and upgrade the TACP Family of Systems.Dual Channel Headset1500 dual channel headsets are being fielded to the operating forces. Primary focuswill be OEF. 9-5
    • TACTICAL AIR CONTROL PARTY MANNING UPDATE *Structure reflects current Driving the 2012 URB Increase manning levels 2008 2012Any ground combat arms SNCO or Who serves as 0861: Sergeants and aboveabove JTAC? Primary duty with MOS billetCollateral Duty Type of duty fill requirement and separate line number on unit T/Os(1) Air Officer (AO) (1) AO(1) Assistant Air Officer/FAC Infantry Battalion TACP (1) Assistant AO/FAC(1) FAC (2) JTACs (1) FAC (3) JTACs(3) JFOs (13) JFOsA/C: 169 R/C: 62 JTAC Requirement A/C: 277 R/C: 142Total Force: 231 Total Force: 419A/C: 196 R/C: 52 Total: 248 FAC Requirement A/C: 187 R/C: 61 Total:248 0861 JTACs staffed to artillery regiments JTACs were and sent to battalions to deploy. JTACs replaced annually serve in billet for 3 years, providing continuity 9-6
    • TACTICAL AIR CONTROL PARTY MANNING UPDATE 2010 vs 2012 JTAC/FAC/JFO BN T/O 2010 Infantry Battalion 2012 Infantry Battalion WPNS WPNS AO & Asst AO AO & Asst AO KEY KEYCollateral Primary FAC JFO JFO (From JTAC (From FAC JFO JFO (From Duty Duty 03XX Arty FST) Arty FST) 03XX Arty FST) JTAC JTAC 9-7
    • SECTION 10 --- AVIATION READINESS AND SAFETYAviation Training and Readiness Program 10-2Current Readiness Improvement Program 10-4Sortie-Based Training Program 10-5Marine Corps Sierra-Hotel Aviation Readiness Program (M-SHARP) 10-5Flying Hour Program and Core Competency Resource Model 10-6Marine Aviation Aircraft Inventory 10-9Marine Aviation Safety 10-10Training and Readiness Manual Updates 10-11Mission Planning System (JPMS) 10-13 10-1
    • AVIATION TRAINING AND READINESS PROGRAMMarine aviation must be prepared to respond to operational tasking around The foundation of every Marine aviation community T&R is the Commandantthe world. Its effectiveness is directly related to unit sortie generation of the Marine Corps-approved Core Competency Model. The Corecapability, the ability to command and control aviation assets, and our ability Competency Model establishes the basic structure around which each T&Rto train mission skill-proficient crews and combat leaders in a standardized program is created and links the following:manner at levels commensurate with the aircraft and command and control • Mission StatementMission Essential Task List output standards. • Mission Essential Task List (METL)Aviation Training and Readiness (T&R) Program (Today) • Core Model Minimum Requirement (CMMR)NAVMC 3500.14.B outlines the standards, regulations and policies regardingthe training of Marine Corps aircrew, Command and Control, airfield • Unit Core Capability (MET Output Standards)emergency and operations services, and meteorological and oceanographic • Core/Mission Skill Proficiency (CSP/MSP), Crew CMMR, and Combatpersonnel. The aviation T&R Program implements a comprehensive, Leadership (CL) Requirementscapabilities-based training system. This system provides mission skill-proficientcrews and combat leaders to MAGTF and combatant commanders. TheMarine aviation T&R program aligns with Department of Defense (DoD) and Aviation Training and Readiness Program (Future)joint requirements by prescribing training standards required to develop core TECOM(ATD) has developed adjustments to the T&R Program to provide acompetent units that can fulfill operational requirements of combatant clearer link between T&R event proficiency, the T&R Core Model, METcommanders. The T&R program has been updated to identify resource capability, and required readiness reporting under the DRRS –MC initiative.requirements for training and assist in HQMC planning and budgeting. TheMarine aviation T&R program structure, Unit Readiness Reporting methods,and Training Resources Requirements’ contribution to force readiness isdepicted below. MARFOR Requirements (Core METs) Combatant Scalable Operational Commander Force Requirements Joint Task Force Requirements Requirements (Named Operation) Core Competent Unit Unit Aviation T&R Program Training Resources Readiness Core Competency Model •DoD Readiness Reporting •Core Competency •Mission Statement System – Marine Corps Resource Model (CCRM) (DRRS-MC) •Flight Hours •Core METL •M-SHARP: CMTR and ACC •Ordnance (Future) •Output Standards Reports •Ranges (Future) •Unit Training Events •Collective Training •Targets (Future) •Core/Mission Skills •Core/Mission Skill Proficiency •Aggressors (Future) •Combat Leadership •MET Output Standards •Other external support •Core Model Minimum Requirements (CMMR) •Combat Leadership 10-2
    • AVIATION TRAINING AND READINESS PROGRAMMission Essential Task List (METL) T&R Program ManualTo date, all aviation communities have established unit Core and Core TECOM(ATD) is re-drafting the T&R Program Manual to more thoroughlyPlus METs. These validated and standardized Core and Core Plus METs describe aircrew readiness reporting in DRRS-MC and the Current Readinesshave been incorporated into community T&Rs as the Mission Essential Improvement Program (CR). This readiness chapter will describe theTask List. purpose and intent of both reporting venues as well as provide policy and guidance for reporting. Comparing monthly Training Ratings in DRRS-MCMission Skills and aircrew training accomplishment depicted in Aircrew Core CompetencyAll Marine aviation communities have established a framework within (ACC) reports provide a more accurate and detailed depiction of unitT&R Program Manual guidance whereby core skills are comprised of training readiness.essential events that act as enablers for higher-order skills or “missionskills.” Mission skills represent those skills that most closely represent T&R Core Model Training Report (CMTR) & Aircrew Core Competencythe METs. It is in the mission skills-to-MET correlation where a (ACC)commander can best gauge the readiness of his unit to accomplish a In response to DRRS-MC and Current Readiness initiatives, TECOM(ATD)specific MET. With this in mind, the T&R program has incorporated the has created a working CMTR and ACC model that fulfills reportingmission skills concept for aviation communities governed by the T&R guidance. Once the methodology is approved, commanding officers willprogram. be provided with access to training assessment tools within M-SHARP for use in both planning future T&R training events and in readiness reporting.MET to Core Skills/Mission Skills MatrixThe core skills / mission skills- to- MET matrix serves a valuable role inlinking unit METs to core and mission skills, thus laying a firm foundationfor both training program structure and accurate readiness reporting.This table, as depicted in each T/M/S T&R manual, represents both thebuilding block core skills and culminating mission skill that represents thetraining associated with each MET. CMTR Working Model Core METL to Core / Mission Skill Matrix (KC-130J Example) DRRS-MC HQMC PP&O Readiness Branch (POR) has replaced SORTS and DRRS-S reporting with a single method, and application tool, named Department of Defense Readiness Reporting System – Marine Corps (DRRS-MC). Among other metrics, DRRS-MC calculates a unit’s training readiness via a T-rating. The CMTR and ACC report within M-SHARP, when fully functional, will provide a near real-time picture of a unit’s aircrew readiness, as well as provide a ready-reference for the commander to use to better inform the commander’s assessments in DRRS-MC. 10-3
    • CURRENT READINESS IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMCurrent Readiness & Naval Aviation Enterprise Mission: Marine aviation The Goal: A Core Competent Unitcommanders and leaders – in concert with the Naval Aviation Enterprise (NAE) The most direct measurable output of the CR process is the production– will plan, execute, and manage the current readiness (CR) process in order to of core competent units. The design of CR, therefore, is to supportmaximize readiness of equipment and personnel. The focus must be on mission essential task (MET)-based output standards that areoptimizing material resource allocations and expenditures while minimizing consistent with a core competent unit (squadron or detachment).logistics downtime and delays. Leaders will conduct CR operations to alignMarine aviation with enabling organizations. The purpose of this alignment isto predictably and effectively achieve required levels of readiness to producecore competent aviation units (squadrons / detachments) for warfightingmissions.Goals: The goal of Marine aviation is to attain and maintain combat readinessto support expeditionary maneuver warfare while at the same time preservingand conserving Marines and equipment. Embedded within this combatreadiness goal is the ability to plan for crises and/or contingency operations,and the capacity to deploy rapidly, effectively, and efficiently on short notice. Increase aircraft readiness Key Performance Indicators (KPIs): To create consistent and integrated − Increase aircraft availability performance-based measurements, type/model/series (T/M/S) teams − Increase in-reporting (IR) rates determine which processes should be measured, what metrics would be − Decrease out-of-reporting (OR) rates used for the analysis, and which of those metrics are to be considered key − Reduce depot turnaround time performance indicators (KPIs). Reduce workload on Marines Ready for Tasking (RFT): One of the main goals of the CR CFT is being able to Understand and manage costs provide the appropriate amount of RFT equipment resources to support a Extend service life for legacy aircraft squadron’s current mission. Achieve programmed service life for new platforms Trained Maintenance Manpower: Central to producing RFT is the Improve health of organizational and intermediate level maintenance department’s technical ability to maintain aircraft. maintenance departments Maintenance core competency for the maintenance department includes, Increase sortie generation at a minimum, qualifications and licensing (CDI, CDQAR, aircraft sign off, Increase combat power etc.). Increase reliability of aircraft & components Flight Hour Cost-Per-Hour: The goal of the NAE is to produce readiness and Increase reliability of logistics process RFT aircraft while efficiently managing cost. In order to meet this goal, T/M/S teams must be aware and critical of the rate at which, and how, fiscal resources are expended. Aircraft Life Management: Proper management of aircraft utilization ensures airframes attain the expected service life. This is accomplished by managing airframe usage within an acceptable range of life-limiting parameters (flight hours, fatigue, etc.). 10-4
    • Sortie-Based Training Program Marine Corps Sierra-Hotel AviationThe Marine Corps SBTP allows squadron commanders to develop theirunit’s training exercise employment plan (TEEP) and unit training and Readiness Program (M-SHARP)readiness (T&R) requirements to train mission skill-proficient aircrews We have made great strides in the automation of objective, rules-basedand combat leaders per their unit T&R core model minimum risk management within USMC aviation’s flight scheduling and trainingrequirement (CMMR) in order to attain and maintain a T-2 level of management software. The next step on the automated trainingreadiness per NAVMC 3500.14B. A T-2 level of readiness allows a unit to management roadmap for Marine aviation is the continuedfulfill its mission essential task output standard in support of a Marine Air development and sustained use of M-SHARP by USMC aviation flying,Ground Task Force or joint force commander. MACCS, and METOC units. The fielding of M-SHARP has marked the divestiture of SARA and ATRIMS and the stand-up of a web-based,Annual Unit SBTP Submission. The annual unit SBTP forecast is developed authoritative data source for Marine aviation training andat the squadron level, then reviewed and approved by the Marine readiness. M-SHARP leverages the Navy’s web-based trainingAircraft Group (MAG)/Marine Aircraft Wing (MAW)/Marine Corps management system and aviation data warehouse concept with anInstallations (MCI)/Marine Force (MARFOR)/DCA chain of command. automated, Marine aviation-specific training and readiness system. M-DCA (APP-2) consolidates the MARFOR T/M/S inputs into a single Marine SHARP will provide Marine aircraft wings with a user-friendly, web-basedAviation SBTP by T/M/S. Unit SBTP forecasts shall be submitted by training management system. M-SHARP’s robust scheduling, eventsquadrons NLT 26 August each year for the following fiscal year (FY). tracking, and objective operational risk management capabilities areDCA (APP-2) utilizes the T&R T/M/S Core Competency Resource Models designed to help the commander prevent delinquent or unqualified(CCRM) and the MARFOR T/M/S SBTP submissions for the final individuals (or crews) from being scheduled for an event withoutdevelopment of the Marine aviation tactical aircraft (TACAIR) FHP requisite skills, proficiency, or supervision. TECOM(ATB) has assumedrequirement for DCA approval prior to submission to OPNAV N43. responsibility for the management of M-SHARP for Marine aviation.Monthly Unit SBTP Execution Submission. The monthly unit SBTP Expeditionary airfield (EAF) and aircraft rescue and firefighting trainingexecution report provides squadrons and above the data required to will also be tracked and managed via M-SHARP. This will provide thetrack unit SBTP and FHP execution. MWSS commander with a tool to assess the EAF/ARFF sections training readiness even when Marines are “FAPed” to station. M-SHARP SBTP Forecast/Execution Reports METOC forecasters and maintainers utilize M-SHARP for baseline core competencies and utilization of the readiness tracking tool to give oversight and commander verification of overall competencies and readiness. 10-5
    • FLYING HOUR PROGRAM (FHP) AND CORE COMPETENCY RESOURCE MODEL (CCRM)Marine Corps Flying Hour Program Management (MCO 3125.1B) Support (CMS) has experienced significant cost growth. In an effort to mitigate these increases, the Assistant Commandant of the Marine CorpsThe term “Flying Hour Program” refers to the allocation and obligation of funds released the ‘Marine Corps Aviation Flying Hour Program Contract Policyfrom the Operation and Maintenance, Navy (OM,N) and Operation and and Guidance’ message (312009ZMar10). This message directs that CMSMaintenance, Navy Reserve (OM,NR) accounts appropriated to the Marine related reports be submitted quarterly and that each level of commandCorps for the operation and maintenance of Marine Corps aircraft. reviews its funded contracts for efficacy and necessity and eliminate thoseMarine Corps flight operations management is composed of two elements: the without requirement. Proceeding as directed by the message will decreaseSortie Based Training Program (SBTP) and the FHP. The SBTP is the CMS costs and allow the operating forces to regain diminished skill setscommander’s execution tool while the FHP, which provides policy, guidance, resulting from CMS.and responsibilities for the execution of the Marine Corps flight hours, is theSBTP’s budgeting tool. It is important to stress that the SBTP is the foundation Core Competency Resource Model (CCRM)for all that we do, while the FHP is a measuring tool used by OPNAV to allocate The CCRM directly links the FHP, T&R syllabi, and the readiness reportingresources. All commanders shall use all available resources to ensure their system (DRRS-MC) in order to generate annual flying hour and sortiecommands are trained per the current editions of the appropriate requirements (including training, support, or operational sorties) fortype/model/series T&R manuals. Key sections of the FHP order include: maintaining required T-level readiness ratings. The Deputy Commandant for • Marine Corps Flying Hour Programs Aviation utilizes CCRM data as the primary guide/validation tool when • Marine Corps Unit CCRM Guidelines providing annual TACAIR FHP inputs to the USN OP-20 budgeting document. • Marine Corps Sortie Based Training Program CG, Training and Education Command (TECOM) Aviation Training Division • Marine Corps FHP Reporting Branch (ATB) is the custodian of the CCRM for each T/M/S. The CCRM and predictive scheduling tools are maintained on the TECOM websiteMarine Corps Flying Hour Programs (http://www.tecom.usmc.mil/atb).Schedule A: Tactical Aircraft (TACAIR) FHPDeployable active component (AC) fixed-wing, rotary-wing and tilt-rotor Marine Corps SBTP Guidancesquadrons. Activated reserve component (RC) squadrons will also be funded In recent years the Marine Corps FHP experienced a negative trend infrom the gaining MARFOR TACAIR FHP. measuring execution of SBTP baseline flight hours. The divergence betweenSchedule B: Fleet Air Training (FAT) FHP the annual CCRM training requirement and execution of SBTP flight hoursAll Marine Corps fleet replacement squadrons. has resulted in an unfavorable and pressurized budgeting environment and has put the T-2.0 flight hour requirement at risk and could lead toSchedule C: Fleet Air Support (FAS) FHP decreased USMC FHP budgets in the future if this negative trend is notDeployable and non-deployable AC operational support aircraft (OSA), SAR, corrected.HMX-1, and VMX-22 aircraft. In order to promote the generation of accurate and executable SBTPs,Schedule D: Reserve FHP HQMC Aviation, Aviation Plans, Policy, & Budget branch released the ‘FY11Deployable and non-deployable RC FW/RW/TR squadrons and OSA aircraft. Marine Corps Aviation SBTP Guidance’ message (25200ZMAY10). This message defines CCRM and SBTP, describes the utility of a new predictiveManagement of FHP Cost Growth scheduling tool to assist in the development of a unit’s SBTP, and outlinesDue to increased operational tempo necessitated by Overseas Contingency those factors that shall be factored into an accurate and executable SBTP.Operations (OCO), USMC FHP Contract Maintenance 10-6
    • FLYING HOUR PROGRAM (FHP) AND CORE COMPETENCY RESOURCE MODEL (CCRM)USMC FHP and Readiness OP-20 Flying Hour Program (FHP) Budget continued… • MARFOR requirements are validated with the T&R, CCRM and SBTPUSMC aviation expresses readiness using several metrics. These metrics are a • An aggregate USMC requirement is generated by consolidating squadronuseful tool for daily/weekly/monthly updating, while the SBTP is the basis for requirementstraining goals and mission. The FHP numbers must not draw attention away • Aggregated requirements are then submitted to OPNAV N432D (twofrom, or outweigh, Marine aviation’s focus on sortie-based training; rather, years before the execution year) and incorporated with the requirementsthey are a means to evaluating progress to combat-ready squadrons. of the Navy’s Fleet Response Plan (sortie-based flying hour requirement)The T-level metric is a threshold value used to describe readiness levels as into one OP-20 FHP budget exhibitbelonging to one of four percentage tiers. It is the primary metric and baselinevalue used to express Marine Corps FHP readiness, in aggregate. Each T-level Funding of the OP-20represents a tier of combat readiness and indicates that a certain percentage Once the OP-20 is generated, it is submitted to Congress through OPNAV N80of the Core Model Minimum Requirement baseline number for core skill and the Secretary of the Navy Financial Management Branch (FMB).proficiency crews or combat leaders has been achieved. The four FHP T-levelsand associated combat readiness percentages are as follows: Congress uses the OP-20 as guidance in appropriating funds for the FHP through annual defense appropriations bills. Once appropriated, FHP funds • T-1.0: 85% or greater combat readiness are distributed as follows: • T-2.0: 70% - 84% combat readiness • T-3.0: 55% - 69% combat readiness • FMB distributes funds to the Navy’s Budget Submitting Offices • T-4.0: Less than 55% combat readiness • Funds are passed to the FHP’s four Type Commanders − Commander, Naval Air Forces Pacific (COMNAVAIRPAC)USMC FHP: T-2.0 Mandate − Commander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic (COMNAVAIRLANT) − Commander, Naval Reserve Forces (COMNAVRESFOR) − Commander, Naval Air Forces Europe (COMNAVEUR)As stated in MCO 3500.14B, the Marine Corps is required to maintain a • The MARFORs then receive the funds in the form of an Operating Targetminimum T-level rating of T-2.0 (a 70% or greater combat readiness level). (OPTAR) under the management of the appropriate comptrollerThis level of readiness is the minimum required to rapidly and effectively • OM,N and OM,NR funds are then obligated to the Marine Corps FHP’sdeploy on short notice for OPLAN or contingency operations. four schedules (TACAIR, FAT, FAS, and Reserve).OP-20 Flying Hour Program (FHP) BudgetThe OP-20 outlines the Navy / Marine Corps aviation readiness requirementand is a Department of the Navy (DON) planning document published byOPNAV N43 for the FHP several times per year.The OP-20 FHP budget exhibit establishes the level of annual flying hoursrequired by each T/M/S and outlines the necessary level of FHP funding thatshould be appropriated in order for the Marine Corps to meet its minimumreadiness level of T-2.0. As per Marine Corps Order 3125.1B, theserequirements are determined through the following process: • Using CCRM output, Marine Forces Command, Marine Forces Pacific and Marine Forces Reserve model peacetime tactical aviation training and flight hour requirements for each T/M/S squadron. 10-7
    • MARINE CORPS FLYING HOUR PROGRAM INFORMATIONFY11 Core Competency Resource Model TACAIR FHP requirement by T/M/S T/M/S Hours AV-8B 23,639 CH-46E 17,448 MV-22B 24,158 CH-53D 6,269 CH-53E 21,069 KC-130J 18,394 AH-1W 26,872 UH-1N 8,926 UH-1Y 7,753 FA-18A/C 27,254 FA-18D 18,671 EA-6B 6,238 TOTAL 206,691 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 TACAIR 206,691 213,000 216,955 217,346 218,963 222,960 Fleet Replacement Squadron 35,607 39,512 38,106 36,532 35,710 37,345 Fleet Air Support 25,932 26,122 26,073 25,996 26,464 27,037 Reserves 26,037 28,992 29,164 29,236 29,167 29,426 USMC FHP TOTAL HOURS 294,267 307,626 310,298 309,110 310,304 316,768 10-8
    • Tactical Marine Aviation Aircraft Inventory AVG AGE PMAI T/M/S OF PRIMARY FLEET MISSION AH-1W 21 140 UH-1N 37 50 UH-1Y 2 47 CH-46E 43 119 MV-22A/B 3 130 CH-53D 41 24 CH-53E 23 152 AV-8B 15 130 F/A-18A/A+ 25 56 F/A-18C 18 83 F/A-18D 18 91 EA-6B 25 24 KC-130T 22 28 KC-130J 5 43 AH-1Z 1 19 TOTAL 1136Other AVG AGE PMAI T/M/S OF PRIMARY FLEET MISSION HH-1N 39 4 UH-3H 44 1 HH-46E 42 4 PMAI Primary Mission Aircraft Inventory: Aircraft authorized VH-3D 36 11 to a unit for performance of its mission. Defined by CJCS INST 4410.01B VH-60N 23 8 TAV-8B 22 16 and OPNAVINST 5442.8. F/A-18B 25 6 F-5F 33 1 Data obtained from PB-11 APDF Ver 105 RMD 700 (dtd 28 Jan 10) F-5N 33 11 C-20G 17 1 C-9B 36 2 UC-12B/F/W 30 /25/1 5/4/6 UC-35C/D 12 / 7 2/10 T-34C 33 3 TOTAL 95 GRAND TOTAL 1231 10-9
    • FY 11 CLASS A FLIGHT MISHAPS 30 8.00 Mishap Numbers 25 5.18 Mishap Rate 6.00 20 3.89 15 2.91 4.00 2.52 2.48 10 1.92 2.05 2.26 1.40 1.46 2.00 1.41 5 5 15 11 18 9 6 7 7 4 4 7 0 0.00 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 28-Sep-11 28-Sep-10 CLASS A FM/FM RATE COMPARISON: 7 / 2.48 4 / 1.47 FY10 MISHAPS/MISHAP RATE: 4 / 1.46 10-YEAR AVERAGE (FY01-10) MISHAPS/MISHAP RATE: 8.60 / 2.50 The Operational Risk Management Status Report Standard Requirements Training & ReportingCommand Survey (30-day Baseline/Annual) NATOPS Evaluation (18 months) CO Execute Orders (6 months prior) CMC Commanders’ CourseMaintenance Inspection (Annual/Biennial) Naval Safety Center Survey (Biennial) CO Flight Training AMO School TrainedHuman Factors Council (Quarterly) Standardization Board (Quarterly) WTI School Trained ASO School TrainedAviation Safety Council (Quarterly) Enlisted Safety Committee (Monthly) CO Aviation Safety Command Course (2 yrs) Monthly SafetygramThe requirements reflected in the ORM Matrix represent the MINUMUM LEVEL of compliance required for an aviation unit to operate safely and effectively. Report willspan all active and reserve component squadrons and will reflect compliance with the ORM & Fundamentals Campaign and applicable CMC, MCO and OPNAVINST ordersand policy. 10-10
    • MANUAL VERSION / UPDATES:ANTTP – Air Naval Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures Aviation T&R Manuals T&R Manual NAVMC Complete Update Current Last NextT/M/S Class Program Manual NAVMC 3500.14C 23 Aug 11 EST Aug 13 ANTTP Conference Conference FA-18 NAVMC 3500.50A Ch 1 14 Dec 10 Feb 12CH-46E U NOV 08 JUN 10 MAY 12 F-35B NAVMC 3500.XX TBD EST Jan 12CH-53 D/E U NOV 08 JUN 10 MAY 12 AV-8B NAVMC 3500.51A 8 Mar 11 Next T&R Conf – Feb 12AS TACSOP U SEP 10 MAY10 MAY 12 KC-130T NAVMC 3500.52B 8 Mar 11 Next T&R Conf - Dec12AH-1 W/Z U JUL 11 JAN 11 JAN 13UH-1 N/Y U JUL 11 JAN 11 JAN 13 KC-130J NAVMC 3500.53A 8 Mar 11 Next T&R Conf - Feb12 MV-22B NAVMC 3500.11B Ch 1 14 Dec 10 Next T&R Conf – Feb12USMC RW S JUL 11 JAN 11 JAN 13 EA-6B NAVMC 3500.1A Ch 1 14 Dec 10 Next T&R Conf – Jul12MV-22 U/S JUL 11 FEB 11 FEB 13 AH-1W NAVMC 3500.49 8 Mar 11* EST Sep 12KC-130 T/J U/S SEP 08 JAN 10 FEB 12 UH-1N NAVMC 3500.48 8 Mar 11* EST Sep 12AV-8B U/S SEP 08 FEB 10 FEB 12 AH-1Z NAVMC 3500.104 8 Mar 11 EST Oct 12FA-18 S MAY 05 JUN 04 TBD UH-1Y NAVMC 3500.20A 8 Mar 11 EST Sep 12EA-6B S MAR 08 FEB 10 TBD CH-46E NAVMC 3500.46A Ch 1 14 Dec 10 Next T&R Conf - Jan 12UAS U OCT 09 MAY 11 MAY 13 CH-53D/E NAVMC 3500.47A 8 Mar 11 EST Mar 13NOTES: HH-46 SAR NAVMC 3500.21 24 Apr 07 EST Dec 11• AH-1 and UH-1 incorporated Y/Z information during last conference HH-1N SAR NAVMC 3500.91 18 Mar 11 EST Mar 14• Rotary Wing TACSOP has been renamed Assault Support TACSOP• JSF NTTP design / content is being staffed through the JSF community UC-35C/D NAVMC 3500.92 18 Nov 10 EST Nov 13• USN is the model manager for FA-18A and C, and EA-6B UC-20G NAVMC 3500.93 11 May 11 EST May 14• USMC’s VMFAT-101 is model manager for F/A-18D. F-5E/N NAVMC 3500.83 24 Dec 09 EST Dec 12 C-9B NAVMC 3500.31 24 Jul 07 EST Dec 11 ACE Battlestaff TBD TBD *3rd Qtr, Fy10 UC-12W NAVMC 3500.102 13 Oct 10 EST Oct 13 UC-12B/F NAVMC 3500.30A 10 Dec 10 EST Dec 13 RQ7B UAS NAVMC 3500.34 14 Dec 10 EST Dec 12 RQ7B Maint NAVMC 3500.XX TBD EST 1st Qtr FY12* 10-11
    • MANUAL VERSION / UPDATES MACCS & Aviation Ground Support T&R Manuals T&R Manual NAVMC Complete Update TACC Operations NAVMC 3500.81 20 Oct 10 EST FY13TACC 5900 Maintenance NAVMC 3500.73 EST 1ST TBD Qtr, FY12 TAOC Operations NAVMC 3500.43 AWTG EST FY14 DC(A) CONCURTAOC 5900 Maintenance NAVMC 3500.74 TBD TBD MATC Operations NAVMC DIR 03 Apr 06 EST 3rd Qtr, Fy10 3500.98 NAVMC 3500.76 TBD EST 2ND QtrMATC 5900 Maintenance FY12* NAVMC 3500.95 8 Mar 11 EST FY14 DASC Operations NAVMC 3500.75 TBD TBDDASC 5900 Maintenance LAAD NAVMC 3500.57 IN FOR EST 4TH Qtr FY14 SIGNATU RE NAVMC 3500.38 11 Dec 07 1st QTR, FY 11 METOC METEM NAVMC 3500.62 4 May 09 12 DEC 11 AES 31 Mar 08 EAF 9 JAN 12 NAVMC 3500.45 ARFF 14 NOV 11 AOS MCO P3500.71 15 Sep 04 TBD *Initial Development Conference Next Conference 10-12
    • MISSION PLANNING SYSTEMS - JMPSDescription Functions:• Technological advances in naval aviation aircraft demand a need for • Mission Planning: expeditious, accurate, and deployable/embarkable mission planning − ATO/ACO parsing capability. The system is required to provide automated functionality and to − Takeoff/Landing data be congruent with aircraft OFP releases. Modern aircraft are increasingly − Route planning complex environments when planning and loading cryptological, − Route deconfliction/Safety of Flight communications, route information for the aircraft, weapons, and sensors. − Fuel Planning Pre-flight planning is a mission-critical enabler to several mission sets and − Weaponeering could be considered no-go criteria if it is inoperable. − Threat planning, analysis, masking• JMPS is a co-development project with the USAF. NavMPS is the DoN ACAT − Air Refueling/Air Drop planning IVT POR for mission planning and is a sub-set of JMPS and will serve to replace • Mission Briefing: Portable Flight Planning Software (PFPS) as the single source mission planning − Kneeboard cards system for USMC Aviation platforms. The mission planning system for the F- 35B is the Off-Board Mission Planning System (OMS). The JSF ORD and JSF • Mission Rehearsal: Model Specification (JMS) documents require a mission planning that utilizes − Tactical Operational Scene (TOPSCENE) JMPS as the core planning tool, to interface and integrates with off-board − Skyview planning systems. • Data Loading to Aircraft/Weapons:• JMPS is composed of: Framework (FW), Common Components (CC), and − All A/G munitions are planned & weaponeered using NavMPS aircraft Unique Planning Components (UPC). The Mission Planning • TACAIR: JSOW, JDAM, GBU, MK80 series, HARM, etc. Environment (MPE) is comprised up of CC and UPC for each specific T/M/S • Assault Support: Weapons Engagement Zones platform. − Avionics Data − Comm/Nav Loading – As aircraft OFP’s are released, each platform fields a new MPE which will − Blue Force Tracker (BFT)/Tactical Situation Awareness (TSA) interface with the JMPS architecture to account for changes or new − Communication, Navigation, Surveillance/Air Traffic Management capabilities. (CNS/ATM) – Sample capabilities include route planning, threat analysis, tactical − Tactical Aircraft Moving Map Capability (TAMMAC) graphics, Weaponeering and Stores Planning (WASP) or Weaponeering − GPS Crypto and Release Planner (WARP), and sensor planning. − Electronic Chart Update Manual (ECHUM) − Tactical Graphics/Local Points • Mission Debrief: − Mission Data Debrief Software (MDDS) − Personal Computer Debriefing System (PCDS) Data Transfer critical data Transfer of mission Device (Loader) 10-13
    • SECTION 11 --- AVIATION MANPOWERAviation Manpower Plans 11-2Enlisted Manning 11-3Ongoing Manpower Issues 11-5Manpower Changes with a Transitioning Force 11-6Pilot and NFO Training Requirements through 2020 11-9 11-1
    • Officer Health : 2011 AVIATION MANPOWER PLANS % of A + Nec B % of A+ Nec B Unrestricted Officers JUN 2011 On-Board GAR 1 1 GAR Billets BilletsAviation manpower plans are focused on finding the balance between thecompeting challenges of sustaining current operations and simultaneously 7509 (AV-8) 380 410 93% 347 110% 7523 (F/A-18) 557 593 94% 499 112%transitioning Marine aviation as we prepare for the future. As always, our 7543 (EA-6B) 81 91 89% 75 108%Marines remain the key to success as we confront these challenges. Our 7556/57 (KC-130) 368 399 92% 337 109%Marines continue to deploy at a tempo unparalleled by that of any previous all- F/W PILOT TOTALS 1,386 1,493 93% 1,258 110%volunteer force. The following information highlights the initiatives, programs, 7532 (MV-22) 304 518 59% 451 67%FSRG results of 2011, and our future manpower vision as we continue to 7562 (CH-46) 552 399 138% 311 177%transition into the future. 7563 (UH-1) 329 417 79% 350 94% 7564/66 (CH-53) 604 678 89% 573 105%Endstrength and the AvPlan 7565 (AH-1) 582 708 82% 599 97%Recently the Marine Corps has aggressively pursued an increased overall R/T/W PILOT TOTALS 2,371 2,720 87% 2,284 104%endstrength of 202,000 (202K) active-duty Marines. Concurrent to this growth, 7525 (WSO) 185 166 111% 153 121% 7588 (ECMO) 190 196 97% 157 121%Marine aviation had refined the Marine Aviation Transition Strategy (MATS), NFO TOTALS 375 362 104% 310 121%already in execution. In the fall of 2010 the Marine Corps conducted a Force 6002 (Aircraft Maintenance) 294 269 109% 212 139%Structure Review (FSR) to evaluate and refine the organization, posture and 6602 (Aviation Supply) 219 232 94% 182 120%capabilities required of America’s Expeditionary Forces in Readiness in a post- 7202 (Air CMD & Control) 177 217 82% 166 107%OEF world. These results will reverse several current growth initiatives, 7204 (LAAD) 63 43 147% 33 191%highlight our middleweight fighting capabilities and reduce overall 7208 (Air Support) 190 205 93% 172 110%endstrength. Marine aviation active structure (AC) will reduce approximately 7210 (Air Defense Control) 108 107 101% 82 132% 7220 (Air Traffic Control) 105 83 127% 69 152%11% from 202K highs, while reserve structure (RC) redistributes within. Thefuture reductions will occur systematically through FY19 and are accounted for AVN-GROUND TOTALS 1,156 1,156 100% 916 126%in the following basic reductions of 25 to 21 TACAIR squadrons, 36 to 32 rotary TABLE 3-1 Note 1: MMOA utilizes necessary A and B billets as the Healthand tiltrotor squadrons, and the elimination of 202k growth initiatives within Index vice GAR; this is due to the long Time To Train (T3,) combinedour aviation enablers. Significant to these Force Structure initiatives and with the fact that officers are not promoted by MOS.factored into the implementation strategy is Aviation’s current operationalneeds, continued transitions, and future force laydowns. The ability to draw AVIATION RESTRICTED OFFICER INVENTORYupon our current MATS has allowed Marine aviation the flexibility to adjust CWO LDO Total Restricted Officers JUN 2011accordingly with minimal impacts in all areas. On-Board GAR On-Board GAR Strength 5902 (Electronic Maint) 0 0 33 33 100%Monitoring the Manpower Inventories 5910 (Radar Officer) 12 13 0 0 92%Maintaining healthy manpower inventories provides the flexibility Marine 5950 (ATC Maint) 17 19 0 0 89%aviation requires to meet its dynamic transition and future plans. As force 5970 (Data systems) 16 18 0 0 89%shaping strategy matures, a near term rise in MOS health is expected. Within 6004 (A/C Maint. Engineer) 91 98 45 44 96%the Human Resources Development Process (HRDP) the Grade Adjusted 6302 (Avionics Officer) 94 90 45 44 104%Recapitulation (GAR) represents the requirement for each MOS. Tables 3-1 6502 (Ordnance Officer) 56 54 39 39 102%thru 3-3 depict current aviation manpower inventories and how they relate to 6604 (Avn Supply Ops Off) 44 44 0 0 100%GAR. Aviation also tracks MOS health through analysis of the First Term 6802 (METOC Officer) 26 25 10 10 103%Alignment Plan (FTAP) (Table 3-4) and the Subsequent Term Alignment Plan 7002 (Exp Airfield & ES Off) 37 38 0 0 97%(STAP) (Table 3-5). 7380 (Tacital Sys Officer) 13 13 0 0 100% TABLE 3-2 11-2
    • ENLISTED MANNING Enlisted Occupational Health : 2011Aviation enlisted health (Table 3-3) depicts individual occupational field health OCC FIELDS June 2011 GAR On Board % of GARas a percentage of the FY12 GAR. Compared to last year’s 99% aggregate, this 59XX (Electronics Maintenance) 1681 1625 97%year’s inventory of Marines has declined slightly, but remains healthy at 97%. 60XX (Aircraft Maintenance) 5368 5331 99%Our aviation inventories have kept pace with the 202K end strength growth. 61XX (RW Maintenance) 7387 7325 99%The aggressive growth of the 202K force (5000/year) raised initial concerns in 62XX (FW Maintenance) 4381 4399 100%FY09 with regard to assignable manpower inventory lagging behind demand. 63XX (Avionics OMA) 4689 4434 95%By continuing the crawl-walk-run phase-in plan which was established in FY10 64XX (Avionics IMA) 3012 3087 102%for activation of new units we continue to mitigate these concerns, and 65XX (Aviation Ordnance) 2944 2825 96%present a healthy overall picture. 66XX (Aviation Supply) 2210 2247 102%Additional indicators used in assessing the health of the enlisted force are the 68XX (Aviation Weather) 466 419 90%First Term Alignment Plan (FTAP) and Subsequent Term Alignment Plan (STAP) 70XX (Airfield Services) 2451 2308 94%re-enlistment programs. The FTAP is constrained by the FY in which a Marine 72XX (Air Control/Support) 2265 2048 90%executes his first reenlistment (Table 3-4). However, STAP is a rolling twelve- 73XX (Enlisted Flight Crew) 292 195 67%month requirement for career Marines . (Table 3-5). TOTALS 37146 36243 98% TABLE 3-3Due to the ambitious nature of the 202K growth, M&RA implemented anaggressive retention bonus plan in FY08, resulting in retention rates far First Term Alignment Plan (FTAP) : 2011surpassing those of previous years. These rates undoubtedly will change, butwill be assessed continually. Table 3-4 depicts aviation’s current FY11 OCC Lat FTAP Remain 11 FTAP FY 11% FY 10 FY 09execution at 102%. Aviation’s quota and execution remain consistent with FIELD Moves Exec 1 BS Quota Exec Quota Quotathat in previous FYs. 59XX 21 66 0 63 105% 63 61 60XX 17 212 0 211 100% 211 238 61XX 117 343 0 340 101% 340 300 62XX 14 145 0 143 101% 143 149 63XX 42 224 0 222 101% 222 209 64XX 12 125 0 120 104% 120 119 65XX 4 128 0 128 100% 128 126 66XX 2 95 0 88 108% 88 87 68XX 16 29 0 29 100% 29 24 70XX 12 95 0 91 104% 91 111 72XX 29 97 0 96 101% 96 78 73XX 15 23 0 23 100% 23 18 TOTALS 301 1582 0 1554 102% 1554 1520 TABLE 3-4 Note 1: Boat spaces (BS) are the number of Marines that a specific MOS is programmed to reenlist in a specific FY. 11-3
    • Enlisted Retention Subsequent Term Alignment Plan (STAP)The Selective Reenlistment Bonus (SRB) program has evolved to meet the OCC Zone A/B Zone C Zone D STAP STAP STAP STAP % 3demands associated with Marine aviation’s portion of the 202k growth plan. It FIELD Exec 1 Exec 2 Exec 3 Exec Remain Quota Execwill now further evolve to meet Force Structure Review Group initiatives, whenimplemented, as we move towards a smaller force. The previous growth and 59XX 27 25 10 63 21 80 79%associated program requirements challenged aviation in retaining the best, 60XX 80 70 79 244 46 273 89%hardest –to- retain Marines in critical high-demand / low-density MOSs. This 61XX 142 114 66 332 32 304 109%challenge will continue despite future end strength reductions. Expectations 62XX 67 73 40 184 56 217 85%and incentives will be modified to ensure the Marine Corps supports endstrength initiatives across all affected MOSs and ranks. 63XX 93 67 29 192 21 186 103% 64XX 60 41 29 135 17 132 102%Enlisted Time to Train (T3) 65XX 68 43 18 137 0 99 138%We work continuously within the naval aviation enterprise (NAE) to develop 66XX 51 51 18 126 0 86 147%and implement improved solutions to expedite the training and production of 68XX 15 8 4 27 0 19 142%aviation maintenance personnel. HQMC works closely with TECOM on T3 70XX 76 40 26 144 8 137 105%management for our enlisted Marines. 72XX 48 24 19 92 24 105 88%Aviation “Top 6” and Enlisted Grade Shape Review (EGSR) 73XX 7 7 6 20 2 16 125%The Marine Aviation Transition Plan applied resources to improve aviation TOTALS 734 563 344 1696 227 1654 103%safety initiatives discussed in CMC Policy Directive 1-05. Part of the directive’sintent was to provide more experience and supervision in the enlisted ranks of TABLE 3-5the QA, Maintenance Control and Safety Departments. Presently, Marine Note 1: Zone A = fewer than 6 years’ active duty.aviation’s “Top Six” inventory (E4-E9) is 63.8% of the total enlisted population. Zone B = 6-10 years’ active duty.This number reflects favorably against a Marine Corps- wide Top Six Note 2: Zone C = 10-14 years’ active duty.percentage of 55.4%; however, aviation units by their nature require NCOs to Note 3: Zone D = 14-19 years’ active duty.have more certifications and qualifications, and the ACE Top Six number isgenerally ten percent higher than that of the GCE and LCE. Forecast budgetaryconstraints have brought these ratios under closer scrutiny and will drivefuture force shaping actions. Anticipation is for very slight modifications withinaviation’s “Top 6” ratios. 11-4
    • ONGOING MANPOWER ISSUESAvPlan Implementation Strategy and FSRG Decreases Aviation Career Pay (ACP) Goals/Current StatusFollowing an in depth Force Structure Review process in late 2010 and early MARADMIN 637/09 defines the specifications relating to ACP. ACP is a special2011, the Commandant of the Marine Corps approved an overall endstrength pay that varies annually depending on the health of aviation officer inventories.reduction of the Marine Corps. This capability-focused approach will The intent is to provide a proactive, long-term aviation career incentive forsuccessfully set Marine Aviation on a post OEF roadmap highlighting our Marine aviation officers. The health of each community is analyzed using amiddleweight, expeditionary force capabilities. Meanwhile we will continue to combination of current and forecast inventories and current and forecastexecute a Marine Aviation Transition Strategy (MATS) that supports this requirements. Budget forecasts show ACP funding is set to meet the anticipatedroadmap. The combination of structure reduction initiatives in the midst of demand.significant aviation transitions will pose challenges to a stressed operatingforce. Key to the implementation of this strategy is a phased approach that Naval Flight Officer Sundown Plankeeps faith with our Marines and begins early rather then late. Based on the current aviation transition strategy, there will no longer be a requirement for USMC Naval Flight Officers in TACAIR cockpits after FY21. The F/A-18D WSO MOS (7525) and the EA-6B ECMO MOS (7588) will beEA-6B Training programmed to end as a primary MOS at a date TBD. Marine aviation is activelyUSMC EA-6B aircrew training will continue at VAQ-129 as it has for the last engaged with Manpower and Reserve Affairs to ensure officer end strength andthirty-five years. In the near future, the USN’s transition to an EA-18G force accessions provide flexibility and professional opportunities for remaining NFOs,by FY15 will require the USMC to periodically reevaluate initial EA-6B training while capitalizing on NFO MOS expertise. This expertise will be harnessed byto determine the best course of action for the Corps and Naval Aviation aligning the electronic warfare and missions systems skills in the NFOEnterprise as a whole. community with emerging requirements in the UAS family of systems (FoS), manned ISR initiatives and the F-35B program. Additionally, the sundown plan will include an increase in NFO-to-pilot transition opportunities.F/A-18A/C/D FRS TrainingF/A-18 C/D training is currently conducted by VMFAT-101, VFA-122 and VFA-106. Beginning in FY13, the USMC will cease F/A-18 C/D FRS production at TACAIR IntegrationVFA-122. Consequently, MATSG-23 will sundown concurrently with the Marine aviation has worked closely with the Navy in order to match eachdivestment of USMC participation at VFA-122. Manning and staffing will be service’s TACAIR resources to their mission requirements. In the execution ofadjusted accordingly at VMFAT-101 and MATSG-33 to support the resulting this plan, Marine F/A-18 squadrons embarked aboard aircraft carriers requireincrease in USMC production requirement at those FRSs. additional manpower to meet the demands of operating at sea. Accordingly, an updated table of organization (T/O) was developed for F/A-18 A+/C squadrons programmed for tactical air integration (TAI), with an increase of seventeen Marines . The Navy also programmed for three 57-man Intermediate Maintenance Activity (IMA) detachments to increase expeditionary capabilities for their UDP units. 11-5
    • MANPOWER CHANGES WITH A TRANSITIONING FORCE The Osprey has completed three combat deployments to Operation IRAQIHQMC Aviation (ASM), Total Force Structure (TFS) and Manpower and Reserve FREEDOM, and is on its fourth combat deployments supporting OperationAffairs (M&RA) continue to manage finite resources to meet the expanding ENDURING FREEDOM and fourth successful deployments with Marinerequirements associated with our transition plans and the operational Expeditionary Units.requirements of our force. Beginning in FY12, the CH-46E to MV-22B transition will return to a boardKC-130J Conversion selection process. This will allow for better management of the medium liftActive component VMGR squadrons have completed KC-130J transition and community as we sundown the CH-46E and transition the MV-22B intoare now fully focused on supporting operational commitments. The tables of Okinawa and Hawaii This new policy will take into account the critical balanceorganization for all three squadrons now meet the requirements of a fifteen- of building the VMM population aggressively while also continuing to meetplane PMAI. KC-130J squadrons are structured to support a nine-plane core ongoing warfighting requirements of the CH-46E. The annual DCAsquadron and up to two three-plane detachments. While this structure is transition/conversion board continues to select fixed-wing pilots, and rotary-aligned with the KC-130J T&R, it is not meant to restrict the flexibility as to wing pilots from outside the CH-46E community, for MV-22 transition.how KC-130J supports the MAGTF. The reserve component will begin itstransition to the KC-130J in FY15 and will maintain a twelve-plane PMAI with asix-plane core squadron and up to two three-plane detachments. UH-1Y/AH-1Z Conversion The UH-1Y has completed four successful deployments to OperationThe KC-130J brought changes to squadron manpower requirements by ENDURING FREEDOM with MAG-39 squadrons. In fall 2011, the first AH-1Z willreducing the number of Marines required to maintain and operate the new deploy with the 11th MEU, making it the first time a MEU will deploy with bothaircraft. Additionally, six years of KC-130J operational experience since IOC in UH-1Y and AH-1Z aircraft. In FY12, an H-1 TTU is standing up at MAG-29 to2005 positioned the community to re-evaluate its manpower requirements. begin training the first UH-1Y Marines on the east coast. A significant numberAs a result, the KC-130J loadmaster and crew chief have been merged into a of Y/Z trained Marines are now in operational units within 3d MAW. Thesingle Crewmaster MOS. addition of these Marines to the fleet will bolster the growing UH-1Y and AH- 1Z experience base.Additionally, the armed KC-130J Harvest HAWK mission requires a Fire ControlOperator (FCO) to operate the fire control station. Initial deployment Structure has been consolidated at VX-9, NAWC China Lake, and will providerequirements for this crew position will be filled by WSOs and pilots with the infrastructure for future H-1 Operational Test and Evaluation (OT&E)sensor management and weapons employment experience. Several courses of requirements. HMLAT-303 is being augmented with contract maintenanceaction are in development to develop these skill sets within the KC-130J support (CMS). The increase in FRS manpower will support both conversioncommunity and provide for a long term solution for the manning of the FCO training of fleet squadrons and increased throughput associated with thecrew activation of three additional HMLAs. Furthermore, plans are being refined to increase use of reserve personnel and units in support of the FRS and theMV-22 Transition overall H-1 transition. The MAG-29 TTU will begin training in the UN-1Y inSecond Marine Aircraft Wing’s HMM to VMM transition is complete. Marine FY12.Aircraft Groups-26 and -29 have been realigned so that MAG-26 is all tilt-rotorand MAG-29 has all rotary wing squadrons. Focus is now on transferring Because of the increased performance of the UH-1Y, in 2011 DCA changed theand/or leveraging manpower with MV-22 experience to the west coast as we PAA of the HMLA squadrons from 18 AH-1W and 9 UH-1N to 15 AH-1Z and 12continue to transition HMM squadrons to VMMs. UH-1Y. Subsequently, manpower has increased the total number of UH-1Y pilots and crew chiefs and decreased the total number AH-1Z pilots and the total number of flight line mechanics. 11-6
    • VXX Conversion UAS TransitionHMX-1 will continue the executive lift mission with legacy VH aircraft until The Marine Corps continues to institute significant changes with respectanother platform is introduced. The analysis of alternatives for the next to manpower and equipment within its UAS squadrons. The activation ofgeneration Presidential helicopter is underway. VMU-3 has helped to alleviate some of the strain on our initial squadrons. This will be further augmented by a further growth within our operational reserve UAS units. VMU-4 will continue to grow in both size and capabilityCH-53K Transition and be further augmented by the Force Structure Review Group’s decisionHX-21 will begin receiving structure to support CH-53K developmental test in to stand up new VMU-5 beginning in FY12. Additionally, a UAS OfficerFY11. Marine aviation is executing a phased manpower plan to augment VMX- PMOS POI is under development in order to further advance the creation22 as they continue the CH-53 OT&E mission. Initial structure will support OT&E of needed PMOS expertise within this community. An enhanced accessionplanning with follow-on structure to support a CH-53K operations and and lateral move plan will begin with M&RA approval in the FY12maintenance capability. In FY13, a CH-53K maintenance training support timeframe and will be tied to the delivery of STUAS systems to thedetachment will stand up in West Palm Beach, Florida. operating forces.F-35B Transition Future RQ-7B Shadow initiatives continue to support the deployable detachment structure to include the structure requirements for futureManpower requirements have been programmed to support all squadron STUAS capabilities. Initial manpower growth will be phased in beginning intransitions from legacy TACAIR TMSs (F/A-18A/C/D, EA-6B and AV-8B) to F-35B FY12 and be complete by FY14. With the rapidly developing technologiesand the activation of FRS squadrons through FY17. This programming includes and capabilities found in unmanned aerial systems, further structurethe standup of the Joint Integrated Training Center (JITC), activations of VMFA- initiatives will be needed to meet the demands of a growing community.332 and VMFA-212 from cadre status, the transition of an additional threeoperational squadrons from legacy, and the activation of two FRSs (VMFAT-501 By FY18, the MAGTF will employ UAS with an expeditionary capabilityand VMFAT-502). The JITC, located at Eglin AFB, is the site for the first F-35B exceeding that currently available from existing systems. UAS capabilityFRS and all F-35B maintenance training. It is composed of the 33d Fighter Wing will continue to expand with the possible acquisition of a Group 4- sizedstaff, the 33d Maintenance Group, the F-35B FRS (VMFAT-501), an Academic UAS in the near future. This system will exceed the current RQ-7BTraining Center, and a Maintenance Training Squadron (359 TRS). Planned capability and drive additional manpower skill requirements forsquadron transitions to F-35B begin in FY12. Aviation selected the first cadre of intelligence, weaponization and electronic warfare for continued supportJSF instructor pilots in CY09 and will convene follow-on F-35B transition to future MAGTF requirements. Tied to the creation of a PMOS Officer isselection boards to meet FRS and operational squadron staffing requirements. the need to meet this planned advancement in both capability and training requirements. The ACMC signing of a June 2011 universal needsTargeted communities for transition to F-35B are F/A-18, AV-8 and EA-6B. statement (UNS) for the weaponization of RQ-7B Shadow and furtherTransition manpower plans are designed to support manpower requirements testing of a Cargo UAS capability will also change requirements for UASfor both the introduction of F-35B squadrons and while maintaining legacy TMS manpower, training, and tactical leadership in the near future. Despitedeployment capability. VMX-22 will assume mission of F-35B OT&E. several other Force Structure Review initiatives, one thing is abundantly clear. The future of UAS within the MAGTF is growing daily. 11-7
    • Current Aviation Exchanges Country/Service Foreign Nation or Inter-service Billet with USMC Australia AH-1 (MAG-39)Personnel Exchange Program (PEP) F/A-18 (MAG-31) F/A-18 Maintenance Officer (VMFAT-101)The Marine Corps shares aviation exchange billets with our sister services, Air Traffic Control (MACG-38)allies and partners. In addition to these billets, the Marine Corps continues to Canada F/A-18 (MAG-31)expand exchange programs to share tactical experience and operational KC-130J (VMGR-252) Italy AV-8B (MAG-14)employment concepts for a new generation of aircraft, unmanned aircraft Spain AV-8B (MAG-13)systems, and C2 technology. Applicants for PEP billets are thoroughly screened United Kingdom F/A-18 (VMFAT-101)to ensure they are the most competitive and qualified individuals to represent MV-22 (MAG-26)their service and country. More information can be found on the HQMC AH-1W (MAG-39) Air Defense Controller (MAWTS-1)Aviation website. Table 3-6 depicts current USMC aviation exchanges. United States Air Force F-5 (VMFT-401) F/A-18 (MAG-31)While most exchange tours last two to three years, we are also exploring short AV-8B (MAG-13) (2)term “subject matter expert” exchanges with non-traditional partner nations. UH-1Y (MAG-39)These short term exchanges will be coordinated with MAWTS-1 and will KC-130J (VMGR-252) JTAC (EWTGPAC)encompass a wide variety of aviation communities. Air Traffic Control (MACS-1) Tactical Air Defense Controller (MACS-1) United States Army UH-1 (MAWTS-1) United States Navy F/A-18 (MAWTS-1) (2) EA-6B ECMO (MAWTS-1) (2) Country/Service USMC Billets with Foreign Nation or Inter-sevice Australia ARH Tiger (RAA) F/A-18 (RAAF) F/A-18 Maintence Officer (RAAF) Air Traffic Control/Support (RAAF) Canada F/A-18 (CAF) CC-130 (CAF) Italy AV-8B (IN) Spain AV-8B (SN) United Kingdom Typhoon F2 (RAF) Mk4 Sea King (RN) Mk7 Lynx (RM) Air Defense Controller (RAF) United States Air Force F-16 (Filled by F/A-18 pilot) (Luke AFB) F-16 (Filled by AV-8B pilot) (Shaw AFB) F-22 (Filled by F/A-18 pilot) (Nellis AFB) JTAC (AGOS/JFCC) (Nellis AFB) MC-130P (Eglin AFB) HH-60G (Davis Monthan AFB) Air Traffic Control (Eglin AFB) Tactical Air Defense Controller (Hill AFB) CV-22 (1) United States Army AH-6 (TF-160) (Fort Cambell) United States Navy F/A-18 (NSAWC) (NAS Fallon) EA-6B ECMO (NSAWC) (NAS Fallon) (2) TABLE 3-6 NOTES: (1) Pending (2) Not currently filled 11-8
    • PILOT TRAINING REQUIREMENTS THROUGH 2020Aviation Training System (ATS) InitiativesWe continue to refine our comprehensive and fully integrated training continuumfor all Marine aviation platforms. Key program initiatives include standardizationand evaluation for flight leadership and for T&R events across all tactical andtraining evolutions, to include all aircrew, maintenance and C2 personnel. In thelong term, we expect higher-quality training at reduced costs through a systemsapproach to training with an increased reliance on high-fidelity simulators. Withineach of the three active duty Air Wings, we are placing aircrew, maintenance, and C2training detachments at all major subordinate command locations. This will facilitatethe integration of tactical training across all platforms and incorporate increasedsimulation. The initial structure dedicated to fill core staff billets was complete atthe end of FY10. ATS continues its migration to the RC.Officer Time to Train (T3)Increased efficiencies throughout the aviation training continuum decreased T3 inmost communities. Table 3-8 depicts the last FY’s full time to train from The BasicSchool (TBS) to the Fleet. Time to Train 4.0 3.5 3.0 2.5 Years 2.0 FY11 1.5 1.0 0.5 0.0 AV-8B FA-18 EA-6B KC-130 CH-53D CH-53E CH-46E AH-1W/Z UH-1N/Y MV-22 WSO ECMO TABLE 3-8 MOS 11-9
    • PILOT AND NFO TRAINING REQUIREMENTS• The CAT I initial accession and NFO numbers are derived from MPP-30 officer accession models.• The CAT II,III, and IV numbers are derived from MMOA historical data and planned assignments.• Tables reflect pilot training requirements published in the OPNAV Training Requirements Letter (TRL) and are subject tochange as updated during Production Alignment Conferences (PACs) and naval aviation enterprise direction.• USMC inputs are submitted annually and are based on a ten-year forecast. Cat I Totals MARINE AVIATION PILOT TRAINING REQUIREMENT FISCAL YEAR STRIKE MARITIME ROTARY TILTROTOR TOTAL 11 85 30 184 41 340 12 84 35 158 46 323 13 87 35 169 64 355 14 85 35 168 64 352 15 80 35 168 64 347 16 83 35 168 80 366 17 86 35 168 80 369 18 91 35 168 80 374 19 97 35 168 80 380 20 97 35 168 80 380 21 97 35 168 80 380 MARINE AVIATION NFO TRAINING REQUIREMENT FISCAL YEAR STRIKE/FIGHTER STRIKE (ECMO) ATDS NAV TOTAL 11 14 14 0 0 28 12 14 14 0 0 28 13 13 14 0 0 27 14 10 12 0 0 22 15 8 12 0 0 20 16 5 5 0 0 10 17 0 0 0 0 0 18 0 0 0 0 0 19 0 0 0 0 0 20 0 0 0 0 0 21 0 0 0 0 0 TABLE 3-9 (CAT I Totals) 11-10
    • TACAIR AIRCREW TRAINING REQUIREMENTS MARINE AVIATION TACAIR PILOT TRAINING REQUIREMENT (PTR) TRAINING UNIT 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 VMFAT-101 FRS TRAINING REQ UIREMENT CAT I P ILOT 23 16 29 32 26 28 32 32 32 13 CAT II P ILOT 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 CAT III P ILOT 13 14 14 16 19 17 20 18 18 13 CAT IV P ILOT 11 18 18 17 19 19 19 14 14 8 CAT V CQ 7 4 6 7 7 8 8 8 8 3 CAT I WSO 14 14 13 10 8 5 0 0 0 0 CAT II WSO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CAT III WSO 7 7 7 7 7 6 6 6 6 6 CAT IV WSO 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 VFA-106 FRS TRAINING REQ UIREMENT CAT I P ILOT 18 18 16 12 10 4 0 0 0 0 CAT II P ILOT 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CAT III P ILOT 11 10 10 6 3 3 0 0 0 0 CAT IV P ILOT 13 12 12 6 4 0 0 0 0 0 CAT V CQ 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 VFA-122 FRS TRAINING REQ UIREMENT(PO S T FY11 PLAN UNDER DEVELO PMENT/ LEGAC Y TRAINING ENDS FY13) CAT I P ILOT 7 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CAT II P ILOT 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CAT III P ILOT 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CAT IV P ILOT 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CAT V CQ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 F/A-18A+/C /D TO TAL REQ UIREMENTS CAT I P ILOT 48 45 45 44 36 32 32 32 32 13 CAT II P ILOT 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CAT III P ILOT 24 24 24 22 22 20 20 18 18 13 CAT IV P ILOT 24 24 24 23 23 19 19 14 14 8 CAT V CQ 8 8 7 8 8 8 8 8 8 3 VMFAT-501 F-35B FRS TRAINING REQ UIREMENT CAT I 0 0 7 9 15 17 31 45 45 45 CAT II BLOCK .5 BEGINS 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CAT II BLOCK 1.0 0 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CAT II BLOCK 1.0 FMS 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CAT II BLOCK 2.0 0 0 26 35 34 43 42 41 41 46 CAT II BLOCK 2.0 FMS 0 0 2 3 5 9 9 9 9 8 CAT II U.S. (Aggregat e) 15 14 26 35 34 43 42 41 41 41 CAT II FMS (Aggregat e) 0 3 2 3 5 9 9 9 9 8 CAT III 0 0 0 0 2 7 17 25 25 25 CAT IV 0 0 0 0 6 11 9 14 14 14TABLE 3-10 CAT V (.5-1.0 UP GRD) 5 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CAT V (1.0-2.0 UP GRD) 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CAT V 0 0 0 0 9 12 12 18 18 18 VAQ -129 CAT I P ILOT 7 6 7 7 6 3 0 0 0 0 CAT II P ILOT 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CAT III P ILOT 3 3 3 3 3 2 0 0 0 0 CAT IV P ILOT 3 3 3 3 3 1 0 0 0 0 CAT I ECMO 14 14 14 12 12 5 0 0 0 0 CAT II ECMO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CAT III ECMO 10 5 5 5 5 2 0 0 0 0 CAT IV ECMO 5 5 5 5 5 2 0 0 0 0 VMAT-203 FRS TRAINING REQ UIREMENT CAT I P ILOT 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 25 25 20 CAT II P ILOT 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CAT III P ILOT 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 12 12 11 CAT IV P ILOT 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 11 11 11 11-11
    • ASSAULT SUPPORT PILOT TRAINING REQUIREMENTS MARINE AVIATION ASSAULT SUPPORT PILOT TRAINING REQUIREMENT (PTR)TRAINING UNIT 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20VMGR KC-130J TRAINING REQ UIRMENTCAT I 30 35 35 35 35 35 35 35 35 35CAT I T RANSIT ION 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2CAT II 8 4 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0CAT III 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8CAT IV 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6VMMT-204 (MV-22) FRS TRAINING REQ UIREMENTCAT I 41 46 64 64 64 80 80 80 80 80CAT I USAF (CAT I Syllabus) 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 28CAT I (T ransition) 35 36 28 28 28 10 10 10 10 10CAT II (Series Conversion) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0CAT III 0 1 1 2 10 10 10 10 10 10CAT IV 2 3 3 4 0 0 0 0 0 6CAT V (FMS) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0HMMT-164 (CH-46E) FRS TRAINING REQ UIREMENTCAT I 22 7 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0CAT II 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0CAT III 19 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0CAT IV 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0FMS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0HMHT-302 (CH-53D & CH-53E) FRS TRAINING REQ UIREMENTCAT I CH-53D/E 60 60 60 65 65 65 65 65 59 42CAT I CH-53K 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 12 18CAT I (T ransition) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0CAT II (CH-53D) 10 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0CAT II (CH-53E) 6 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8CAT II (CH-53K) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 26 26CAT III 18 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8CAT IV 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0TABLE 3-11This table reflects pilot training requirements published in the OPNAV Training Requirements Letter (TRL).USMC inputs are submitted annually and are based on a ten-year forecast. 11-12
    • LIGHT ATTACK PILOT TRAINING REQUIREMENTS MARINE AVIATION LIGHT ATTACK PILOT TRAINING REQUIREMENT (PTR)TRAINING UNIT 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20HMLAT-303 (UH-1/AH-1) FRS TRAINING REQ UIREMENTUH-1N:CAT I 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0CAT II 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0CAT III 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0CAT IV 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0UH-1Y:CAT I 26 31 33 35 35 35 35 35 35 35CAT II (N to Y) 30 36 20 19 19 19 19 19 19 19CAT II 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3CAT III 10 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18CAT IV 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0AH-1W:CAT I 61 50 56 56 53 50 47 47 47 20CAT II 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0CAT III 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20CAT IV 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0FMS 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0AH-1Z:CAT I 6 10 10 12 15 18 21 21 21 48CAT II (W to Z) 10 15 13 16 19 26 33 33 33 47CAT II 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 2 2CAT III 0 2 4 4 6 6 6 6 6 6CAT IV 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0TABLE 3-12This table reflects pilot training requirements published in the OPNAV Training Requirements Letter (TRL).USMC inputs are submitted annually and are based on a ten-year forecast.HMLA-773 has been conducting all CAT III UH-1N production since FY09. 11-13
    • SECTION 12 --- MARINE AVIATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PLANAviation Science and Technology (S&T) Strategic Guidance 12-2Aviation S&T Relationships 12-2Marine Corps-specific Aviation Science and Technology Objectives (STOs) 12-3 12-1
    • AVIATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY STRATEGIC GUIDANCEMarine aviation is an integrated and essential component of the Marine (2) Battlefield Situational Awareness: Improvement in the ability toAir-Ground Task Force, supporting and sustaining naval and joint forces know and comprehend the location, intent, and actions of blue/redthroughout the range of military operations. Aviation resources must be forces, non-combatants, environment condition, terrain, and obstaclesavailable to the MAGTF/joint force commander regardless of the in the area of operational responsibility. These improvements includeoperational scenario, austerity of engagement, or level of lethality. Due increased situational awareness for embarked Marines whileto the complexity and expense normally associated with aviation combat maneuvering.and support systems, component extensibility / upgradeability is key toensure future utility regardless of the threat or operational environment. (3) Lethality: Improvement in the ability to precisely deliver a spectrum of intended effects (lethal or non-lethal).The VisionNow more than ever, as we execute the Commandant’s Vision and (4) Battle Command: Improvement in the ability of the commander toStrategy 2025 in complex, hybrid environments, we must be well- decide on a course of action and execute command measured inpostured to remain the nation’s force in readiness, regardless of the response time.operational context. To this end, the aviation vision is for a network-enabled and digitally-interoperable expeditionary aviation combat (5) Affordability: Reduction in development, acquisition, operating andelement postured to execute responsive, persistent, lethal and adaptive support cost while maintaining or increasing capability.full-spectrum operations as directed by the MAGTF or joint forcecommander. (6) Supportability/Maintainability: Improvement in reliability, availability and maintainability.Aviation S&T Strategic GuidanceThis chapter serves to articulate Marine Corps-unique S&T needs to (7) Training: The efficiency with which commanders/staff, pilots,those agencies devoted to aviation S&T priorities. Aviation focal points operators and maintainers are initially and continuously trained toinclude both S&T program opportunities and legacy S&T investment proficiency.category priorities. (8) Footprint: Reduction in the weight and volume of the personnel,Key Program Challenges Major aviation program areas with opportunity materiel, equipment and supplies that support an aerial system andfor high-payoff S&T investments are: must be moved. (1) Data links and Information/Capability Management Networks (2) Heavy Lift Replacement (HLR) (9) Deployability: Reduction in the time, effort, and support systems to (3) Electronic warfare (EW) prepare, transport, and restore a force capability. (4) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) and associated payloads (10) Mobility: The ability to responsively maneuver and transportLegacy Investment Category Priorities These are prioritized categories troops, supplies and equipment on the battlefield in complexin terms of current aviation-related S&T technology terrains/sea states.modernization/transition/insertion as well as future aviation programs. Aviation S&T Relationships(1) Survivability/Safety: Improvement in the ability to avoid detection,tracking and engagement in a complex threat environment and survive Relationships with the below-listed agencies are essential for thehit/crash. Marine Corps S&T IPT to drive adequate aviation leverages, share unique leverage opportunities, and ensure an overall, balanced Marine Corps aviation S&T investment. 12-2
    • AVN STO 2: Advanced Electronic Warfare (EW) systemsNaval Aviation Enterprise (NAE). The leadership of the NAE publishes a Develop technologies that are compatible with Marine Corps follow-onbiennial S&T Plan and its own science and technology objectives (STOs) electronic attack (EA) platforms as the platform requirements are refined.to provide guidance to the NAE. Marine Corps aviation is dependent Develop multi-function, transceiver arrays that enable future EW as wellupon the NAE for much of its S&T investment and coordinates as as provide adequate bandwidth, SIGINT and ISR and Next Generationappropriate for development efforts of mutual Navy and Marine Corps Jammer technologies. Software Reprogrammable Payload (SRP) is a singlebenefit. common payload module that is flexible and reconfigurable to support simultaneous missions and applications making maximum use of availableOffice of Naval Research (ONR) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). bandwidth and ensuring interoperability within joint standards andMarine Corps drives research primarily via the Marine Corps S&T IPT, but protocols providing commonality across platforms. Collaborative On-linealso through a direct relationship with ONR and NRL. Reconnaissance Provider Operationally Responsive Attack Link (CORPORAL) was a Joint Capabilities Technology Demonstration (JCTD)Air Force Research Lab (AFRL) and Army Research Lab (ARL). Key S&T that demonstrated providing "on-demand" collaborative situationalpartners providing insight into cross service opportunities for awareness and kinetic and non-kinetic fires to the small units target areacollaboration across a wide variety of platforms, programs, and interests. of interest. It consisted of plug-and-play, software reprogrammable, scalable, IP-based, and open-architecture non-kinetic fire solutions whichDefense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Provides cutting- will outpace traditional point solutions, accommodate existing legacyedge research applicable to all of DOD with potentially large payoffs for systems, and provide a bridge to future operational systems, enablingMarine aviation. machine-to-machine collaboration and coordination. With the completionArmy Research, Development and Engineering Command (ARMDEC). of the JCTD, the instantiation of the demonstrated network capability willResponsible, by charter, for rotorcraft S&T. This is a key relationship as become the lead element of the MAGTF EW transition.rotorcraft S&T investment has been minimal for over a decade. AVN STO 3: Sand- and dust-penetrating radar, providing precision (landingMarine Corps-specific aviation STOs quality) navigation video in brown-out, white-out and dust-out visibility conditionsAVN STO 1: Collaborative networking Develop technologies that enables passive obstacle detection at range (e.g., uncharted wires/cables) and enables precision support of distributedDevelop technologies that facilitate and provide for a network-enabled operations in unprepared landing zones for current rotary wing and tiltand digitally- interoperable expeditionary aviation combat element rotor aircraft, as well as supporting technology transition into future UAS.postured to execute responsive, persistent, lethal and adaptive full- Develop complementary technologies to precision quality navigation inspectrum operations. brown-out/dust-out conditions that enables precise, landing quality, non- visual air and groundspeed reference. 12-3
    • AVN STO 4: Command and Control (C2) data fusion and networking AVN STO 8: Ground-based C2 and surveillance systemsDevelop technologies to support data fusion to improve sensor tracking of The concept of active aperture array is critically dependent on thetactical aircraft and UAS as well as the fusing of data from the various ground availability of compact and minimum weight, low consumption and highand intelligence system employed by the MAGTF. The most significant reliability transmit/receive (T/R) modules. Develop technologies thatchallenge for aviation C2 is data fusion. The requirement statement in the provide the thermal margins required to meet mission radar performanceCAC2S CPD describes data fusion as fusing data from real time sensors/ near for the T/R modules using of state of the art, air-cooled technology.real time TADILs and non-real time data components to deliver an adaptive Develop manufacturing techniques that can produce high quality, micro-situational display. Develop a robust data network established with common miniature RF circuits (T/R modules) that are not susceptible to stress anddatabases that push near-real time updates to C2 operators and aircraft. cracking during production. Develop technologies that support theOvercome security and IA requirements with multiple data standards and calibration of an ambient air-cooled active electronically scanned arraysecurity levels. Develop a single system that can interface with both current (AESA).ground C2 and intelligence systems and has communication channels withadequate capacity to transmit and receive terabytes worth of data. AVN STO 9: Advanced laser systems suitable for countermeasure, sensor, and attack applicationsAVN STO 5: Standardized force tracking system Develop laser enabling technologies including multi-scan mirrors; highDevelop technologies that provide 100% assured, covert, real-time power/high efficiency optical amplifiers and switches; dual/multi bandidentification of friendly forces for fratricide avoidance as well as battlefield laser systems; lightweight open and closed-loop IRCM systems; and highcoordination, maneuver deconfliction, command SA, future re- duty cycle systems. Resulting technologies must be applicable to bothsupply/CASEVAC et cetera, during future distributed operations. Incorporate rotary and fixed wing air vehicles, ground based motor vehicles andtracking technologies applicable to red-force/HVT (classified). provide exceptional reliability. Systems developed should interoperate with existing air-vehicle subsystems with minimal integration effort andAVN STO 6: Group 4 Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) provide countermeasure, sensor and attack capabilities.Develop an expeditionary, all-weather, high endurance, multi-missionUAS capable of operating from austere locations and providing AVN STO 10: Scalable, light weight, interference cancellation system andnetworked, interoperable systems to enhance the MAGTF and joint force adaptive/cognitive radio technologies for both co-situated RF emitters andcommander’s battle-space awareness. Further refinement and development RF saturated environments to eliminate VHF, UHF, SATCOM RFof Unmanned System Interoperability Profiles (USIP) standards for aircraft interference between multiple radio and electronic attack systems.configuration, payload interfaces, data Develop low-cost interference cancellation technologies andtransmission, and UAS control will enable seamless integration adaptive/cognitive radio systems to enable assured communications andbetween manned/unmanned systems and command and control networks. information distribution for emerging platforms and systems as well asAdvancements in standard interfaces will allow for interchangeable, mission- technology transition for legacy platforms that suffer communicationstailored payloads such as electro-optical/infrared; electronic warfare; degradation with multiple communications systems or jamming.communications relay ; signals intelligence; synthetic aperture radars such asground moving target indicators; laser designators; hyperspectral sensors, AVN STO 11: Net-enabled weaponslight detection and ranging (LIDAR); wide area airborne surveillance and Develop technologies that enable aviation ordnance to rapidly join thenetwork enablers. battlefield network in order to allow terminal control, ISR, and bombAVN STO 7: Advanced multi-function EW transceiver damage assessment (BDA). Additionally, develop small form factorLeverage next generation jammer (NGJ) technologies to develop capabilities jammers (e.g., digital RF Memory (DRFM) systems) capable of beingcompatible with Marine Corps follow-on EW concepts (e.g., system-of-systems utilized in ordnance, artillery, or expendables.distributed EW, including low observable systems) as the system requirementsare refined. Multi-function transceiver arrays potentially enable future EW aswell as increasing bandwidth access, SIGINT and ISR capabilities. 12-4
    • AVN STO 12: Cargo UAS AVN STO 16: Advanced rotor/prop technologies for performance acrossDevelop advanced UAS vertical lift technologies in order to provide force wider envelopesustainment to multiple company-level operations over a widely dispersed Develop advanced technologies for rotors/props as components of assaultarea. Explore autonomous and semi-autonomous line of sight (LOS) and support propulsion as well as tactical UAVs. As rotorcraft/helicopters (MV-beyond line of sight (BLOS) UAS control in remote deployed environments 22/VUAV) requirements grow in terms of hover load and harshto facilitate navigation and cargo delivery during 24/7 operations. Cargo environments (heat/dust/high altitude), as well as top-end speed,UAS platforms are required to operate at high density altitudes, delivering advanced rotor performance enhancement (dynamic blade shaping) willmultiple in-stride cargo drops with a range threshold of 110 nautical miles garner performance as well as efficiency (fuel/load savings). Develop V-22and an objective of 365 nautical miles, reducing the number of ground capability enhancements to sustain performance KPPs and improve hightransport-delivered items. altitude operations. V-22 design is based on tropical day at 3000 ft/91.5º F. OEF and other potential deployment locations require lift well beyondAVN STO 13: UAS Universal Ground Control Station (UGCS) this ambient pressure/temperature. Develop technology that canDevelop UAS Universal Ground Control Station (UGCS) with Type I increase vertical lift by at least 2000 lbs, increase operational radius by atencrypted Tactical Common Digital Link (TCDL) capable of controlling least 40 nm, and preserve 10,000 lb load KPP.USMC and Joint UAS Family of Systems. Advancement in UGCSinteroperability enables ground control of current and future UAS AVN STO 17: Small form factor, lightweight expeditionary ordnance forplatforms to provide increased operational capability and scalable UAS fixed and rotary wing aircraftoptions to the war fighter. It will also facilitate the rapid development and Develop technology supporting a family of small, lightweight expeditionaryacquisition of system compatible UAS platforms. ordnance for both fixed and rotary wing aircraft. Given the logistic challenges of transporting aviation ordnance to expeditionary forwardAVN STO 14: Active kinetic and non-kinetic aircraft self-protection operating bases (FOBs), as seen in Iraq and Afghanistan, we need small,Develop technologies such as high energy liquid and fiber laser systems lightweight ordnance that can be transported overland or by aircraft (e.g,and continued investment in technologies which enabled systems such as KC-130) to austere sites and then loaded quickly and easily by minimalTactical Aircraft Directable Infrared Countermeasures (DIRCM). Develop personnel. Small form factor ordnance, on the order of 50-250 lbstechnologies that enable “unlimited magazine” self-protect capabilities explosive equivalent, will further increase number of weapons fixed andagainst both IR SAMs and RPGs while reducing requirement for magazine rotary wing aircraft can deliver during a single sortie while both scaling(e.g., flares). Additionally, investigate Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) and effects and minimizing collateral damage. Develop technologies that canHigh Power Radio Frequency (HPRF) technologies development for both enable basic ordnance to have a variety of fusing, guidance and propellingoffensive and defensive lethal and non-lethal effects. packages thereby increasing functionality of this family of ordnance.AVN STO 15: Radio Frequency (RF) countermeasure, decoy, and AVN STO 18: Low collateral damage/low energy weaponsexpendables systems Develop technology supporting a family of low collateral damage/lowDevelop technologies related to RF countermeasures applicable to fixed energetic weapons. Existing methods of obtaining low collateral damageand rotary wing aircraft. Systems include towed decoys, munitions include reducing the amount of explosive filler of existingreleased/launched decoys, RF jamming systems, and RF expendables. weapons. Develop technologies to improve accuracy thereby reducing theDevelop both active and passive RF systems that contribute to, and risk of collateral damage when an appropriate lethality warhead and fusecollaborate with, the EW system-of-systems construct in an EW battle- are applied. Develop technologies that ensure weapon fusing and weaponmanaged environment as well as provide offensive RF capabilities. yield is electable from within the cockpit.Develop technologies that assure that RF systems can interoperate with“blue” force systems in all domains and environments. 12-5
    • AVN STO 19: Cost effective mass memory AVN STO 24: Variable-speed air refueling drogueDevelop improvements for digital map and other avionics systems capable Develop technologies that enable refueling drogues to refuel fast tacticalof higher speed data transfer, as well as sensor data/information storage, aircraft as well as slower rotorcraft.retrieval, and dissemination compatible with airborne and shipboardenvironmental conditions. Develop technologies that enable autonomous AVN STO 25: Aviation technologies that increase the capacity of aviationoperations with comprehensive information onboard. Information assetsstorage onboard autonomous platforms reduce the risk in distributed and Develop technologies for rotary wing and heavy-lift applications tonet-centric operations against an EW-capable adversary where link increase survivability and decrease the weight of aircraft in order toinformation is potentially denied. increase performance of rotary wing transport aircraft. Development of unmanned alternatives to manned helicopters for the delivery of logisticsAVN STO 20: Distributed networking of aviation simulators. support with reduced risk to manned aircraft is also desired.Develop simulators and technologies to enable aviation Marines to trainthe way they fight. This includes engaging the senses in realistic,challenging, and rapidly reconfigurable scenarios which allows scenario-based training and mission rehearsal. The goal is to optimize theapplication of simulation training across the live/virtual/constructive (LVC)training construct throughout Marine aviation.AVN STO 21: Multi-function, low-drag VHF, UHF, and SATCOM(broadband) antennaeDevelop technologies that enable reduced airframe antennae and reducedairframe signature, including conformal arrays and active elements, ascommunications and data link requirements grow, while allowingcommunications growth without additional apertures.AVN STO 22: Composite materials in expeditionary environmentsDevelop technologies for health monitoring of composite structuresenabling “condition based maintenance” and “predictive failure” ofcomposite structures on aircraft in order to reduce time in depot-levelmaintenance facilities as well as reducing NDI. The increased use ofcomposite structures requires an enhanced capability to rapidly makerepairs to these structures in all environmental conditions (heat, cold,sand, humid, etc.).AVN STO 23: Lightweight De-ice/Anti-ice capability for aircraftDevelop technologies to provide a lightweight all de-ice/anti-ice capabilityfor both rotor blades and fuselage that reduces both weight and electricalpower requirements. Current de-ice/anti-ice capabilities are heavy due topower requirements for heating and wiring. 12-6
    • SECTION 13 --- AVIATION TRAINING SYSTEM (ATS)Aviation Training System (ATS) Plan 13-2Marine Aviation Training System Site (MATSS) 13-3Marine Corps Aviation Simulator Master Plan (MCASMP) 13-5Marine Aviation Distributed Virtual Training Environment (ADVTE) 13-10Marine Corps Common Visual Database (MCCVDb) 13-13AH-1 and UH-1 Aircrew Training Systems Roadmaps 13-16MV-22 Aircrew Training Systems Roadmap 13-17CH-53 D/E/K Aircrew Training Systems Roadmap 13-18CH-46 and VH Aircrew Training Systems Roadmap 13-19UAS and Marine Common Aircrew Trainer (MCAT) Systems Roadmap 13-20KC-130 and AV-8B Aircrew Training Systems Roadmap 13-21F/A-18 and EA-6B Aircrew Training Systems Roadmap 13-22F-35B Aircrew Training Systems Roadmap 13-23 13-1
    • AVIATION TRAINING SYSTEM (ATS) PLAN ATS Focus ATS integrates processes and programs for training that institutionalizeToday’s dynamic operational environment requires Marine aviation to focus Operational Excellence across all Marine aviation. “Operational Excellence”its training more effectively and efficiently in order to achieve and sustain involves 1) increased combat readiness; 2) decreased cost of training –the highest levels of combat readiness. The Aviation Training System (ATS) efficient and affordable; and 3) preservation of personnel and assets – Riskintegrates Marine aviation training processes and structures into a single, Mitigation through reduction in mishap causal factors from supervisory,integrated training system, links training costs with readiness, and spans all procedural, and human error. T&R Manuals are foundational sourceMarine aviation communities . Development of an integrated training documents for implementing ATS. The intent of ATS is to:system requires institutionalizing processes that support our missions and • Provide operational commanders with a current, responsive and relevantproviding on-time delivery of tactically relevant training. With Training and training system for aircrew, aircraft maintenance, aviation ground supportReadiness (T&R) as its foundation, ATS provides the MAGTF Commander and C2 personnel.with core and mission skill proficient, combat ready units. Integrated ATS • Develop a holistic training system across every Marine aviation communityprocesses, governed by policy and supported by appropriate resources, throughout the training continuum that supports aircrew (pilot / NFO /provide the catalyst for incremental training system improvements. ATS enlisted), operators and maintainers.integrates and coordinates policy, manpower, equipment, and fiscal • Assist in the standardization of Marine aviation communities.requirements of post initial accession training for Marine aviation officers • Develop concurrency management processes to ensure the training systemand enlisted personnel as well as initial accession aircrew training (Core Skill (curriculum, courseware and training devices) remains relevant.Introduction) for aviation units that conduct T/M/S specific aviation training • Address training and safety issues through Systems Approach to Training-(e.g. Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS), KC-130J Aviation Training Unit derived curricula and improved use of ORM/CRM principles through Risk(ATU)). ATS processes and procedures shall be applicable to all current and Resource Management (RRM).future Marine aviation training programs to include Naval or joint-level • Utilize Marine Aviation Training Systems Sites (MATSS) to facilitate the ATSprograms in which the USMC participates. ATS is outlined in the governing program.policy MCO/NAVMC Dir 3710.6 and NAVMC 3500.14. The ATS model isdepicted in the following figure. ATS Processes ATS is process intensive and includes the following: GOVERNING • Standardization and evaluation: process of training toward and achieving DOCTRINE, POLICIES & DIRECTIVES certifications, qualifications and designations consolidated and standardized LIVE VIRTUAL CONSTRUCTIVE under the MAW ATS structure. This is applicable to flight leadership and non- LEARNING ENVIRONMENT TRAINING TRAINING TRAINING  Trng Req’ts aircrew certifications, qualifications and designations and Contract Instructor ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENT TMP / ATS IG MGMNT (CI) certifications, Naval Air Training and Operating Procedures TRNG TTF / OAG - Instructor-led - Aircraft - Part Task Trainers - Scenario-based  Trng Info (Web-based) - Computer Aided - Vehicles - Full Flight Simulator Training Instruction (CAI) - Self-paced - Operational Equipment - Distributed Mission - Mission Task Trainer TMS LMS Standardization (NATOPS) Instrument training and evaluation, recurring - Ranges Operations (DMO) - Computer Based Training (CBT)  Cert/Desig/Qual generic training such as Instrument Ground School (IGS), Crew Resource FLSE & EVAL - Web-accessed Cmbt Ldr Management (CRM), Operational Risk Management (ORM), and basic Navy STAN - Publications NATOPS / Inst  TSC  CCM  MTT Occupational Safety and Health (NAVOSH) or Naval Aviation Maintenance MAW ATS / MATSS Program (NAMP) training. MITIGATION HQMC / SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT ACQUISITIONS ACQUISITIONS  ORM • Concurrency Management (CCM): process whereby a change in tactics, RISK  CRM  RRM aircraft/operational systems configuration, publications or procedures is evaluated to identify the impact of the change upon training requirements. Upon identification of these training requirement impacts, appropriate and RESOURCES timely changes are made to curricula, courseware and training devices to TRAINING & READINESS PROGRAM ensure concurrency with operational systems and doctrine. (SAT DERIVED CURRICULUM) 13-2
    • MATSS OVERVIEW• Training Information Management Systems: process that integrates The most visible evidence of ATS implementation at each MAW is thethe employment of multiple information systems under a training Marine Aviation Training System Site (MATSS). While ATS as a whole isinformation architecture. Resources that support the management and process intensive, the MATSS, the focal point of ATS execution under theintegration of training information are Training Management Systems operational control of the Marine Aircraft Wing (MAW), is resource and(TMS), Learning Management Systems (LMS), and the ATS website product intensive. ATS resources available at the MATSS include simulatorsmaintained by Aviation Training Division (ATD) at TECOM. The TMS and training devices, web-based training and learning managementtracks T&R progression and helps commanders ensure that training is systems, academic courseware, electronic classrooms, and the military,conducted in accordance with appropriate orders and regulations, civilian and contractor manpower to support, analyze, and provide input tocurrency and qualification requirements are met and ORM principles are improve training system performance. ATS products of MATSS effortsproperly applied. The TMS for aircraft maintenance training is the include: 1) simulator and academic resource usage optimization; 2) aircrewAdvanced Skills Management (ASM). Marine Sierra-Hotel Aviation Standardization and Evaluation; and 3) aircraft platform and communityReadiness Program (MSHARP) is the authorized aviation training Training Management Team issue advocacy. The MATSS construct ismanagement system to be used to track all training governed by aviation currently migrating across Marine aviation while ATS products areT&R manuals. For the F-35B the Autonomic Logistics Information continually analyzed for ways to improve Marine aviation unit readiness.System (ALIS) TMS is the approved TMS for aircrew and maintenance. With increased USMC and Joint-level awareness for ATS, the ability toAn LMS functions as an electronic repository of specific courseware and leverage common solutions across the various platforms and communitiestechnical manuals. The LMS for Marine aviation is the Marine Corps will result in significant cost savings by freeing funds for other requirementsAviation Learning Management System (MCALMS). The ATS website to enhance training across Marine aviation and the MAGTF.serves as a CAC enabled portal for access to other resources and traininginformation management systems such as the LMS. MATSS Activation / IOC Timeline• Risk Mitigation: process that includes risk assessment, risk decision MATSS Activation IOCmaking, and implementation of effective risk controls. Emphasis placed • New River Activated IOC 3d MAW 2d MAWon risk mitigation and aviation fundamentals during all aspects of • Beaufort Activated IOCtraining is required in developing and fostering a climate that promotes • Cherry Point Activated IOCflight discipline and adherence to established procedures and • Miramar Activated IOCrequirements. Such a climate leads operational excellence and • Camp Pendleton Activated IOCmitigation of mishap causal factors. Training devices allow the control ofspecific elements in scenarios that enhance the exercise of risk • Yuma Activated IOCmanagement abilities. Risk mitigation is a by-product of professionalism 4th MAW 1st MAW • Iwakuni Activated IOCand safe practices and must be stressed in all aviation training. • Futenma Activated IOC• Training Management Process (TMP): provides an effective forum for • Kaneohe Bay Activated IOCthe operating forces to identify training issues across the DOTMLPF • Fort Worth Activated Q4FY12spectrum as the impetus for requirements generation and training • JB McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst Activated Q4FY12improvement. The TMP helps determine common solutions to aviationtraining issues, eliminating redundant “stovepipe” solutions which are Training Future / Summarywasteful and inefficient. The TMP is focused on the needs of thewarfighter through platform and community Training Management For Marine aviation, ATS is risk mitigation that represents a game-changingTeams (TMT) and supported by higher headquarters, the acquisition opportunity. Continued attention and accountability at all levels is required.community and industry. All efforts are targeted at improving combat readiness and the preservation of assets and people leading to operational excellence. 13-3
    • MARINE AVIATION TRAINING SYSTEM SITE 1ST MAW ATS 2D MAW •MATSS Iwakuni •MATSS Cherry Point •MATSS Futenma •MATSS New River •MATSS Kaneohe Bay •MATSS Beaufort 3D MAW ATS •MATSS Miramar •MATSS Camp Pendleton •MATSS Yuma 4th MAW •MATSS Ft Worth •MATSS JB McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst 13-4
    • MARINE CORPS AVIATION SIMULATOR MASTER PLANMCASMP RequirementsMarine Corps Aviation Simulator Master Plan (MCASMP) policy has been set byDCA since Dec 2001. All new simulators will function as a system of tacticallyrelevant networked trainers. All new simulator procurements shall be ENHANCED PILOT & AIRCREWcompatible with this Simulator Master Plan at a minimum. The following are SIMULATOR TRAININGstanding requirements:• CONUS bases: section of networked simulators NETWORKING• OCONUS & reserve bases: minimum of one simulator CAPABILITY CAPACITY• Marine Corps Common Visual Data Base (MCCVDb via Navy Portable SourceInitiative (NPSI))• Tactical Environment (TEn) : threat, emitters, weapons flyouts, USMC & jointair & ground interoperability.• Common hardware approach across all T/M/S and community simulators toensure distributed/networked MAGTF and joint simulator training is possible. MULTI-SHIP CREW CONCEPT• Developed IAW current and/or draft T&R, Maneuver Description Guide MAGTF CONCEPT(MDG), and NATOPS manuals.The goals of MCASMP are to reduce overall procurement and sustainment Figure 1.0training costs by procuring training devices and training media (courseware,curriculum, and syllabus) with common hardware and software systems inorder to avoid the cost of developing new or platform unique type-systemsand to pursue only the most promising developmental and maturetechnologies for training, avoid increased cost, and mitigate operational risks.Marine Aviation simulator strategy outlines an increased reliance on simulationto augment flight training and readiness. The vision, strategy, and end statedriving future simulator procurement is depicted in Figure 1.0. The foundationfor simulator key performance parameters will be based on the ability of thetraining device to provide and support a multi-ship capability for similar anddissimilar platforms, the integration of aircrew training, and the ability foraviation systems to be networked with other aviation, ground, and future C2systems to support MAGTF level integrated training. At the micro-level, theability of CONUS and OCONUS systems to satisfy capacity, capability, andnetworking requirements will be essential for achieving the end state ofenhanced pilot and aircrew simulator training (Reference Figure 2.0). Figure 2.0 13-5
    • SIMULATOR TRAINING SYSTEMS System Name Training Function RW FW Visuals Full Non- Network Capability (Fidelity) Motion MotionWST Weapon System Trainer A high-fidelity motion-based training device that supports AH-1W KC-130J X X TEn (connects to(HIGH) 1000-6000 Level T&R training to include familiarization, CH-46E EA-6B ADVTE VIA TEn) networked and tactical flight operations, night vision, FLIR, CH-53E instrument, shipboard operations, and emergency CH-53D procedures.FMS Full Mission Simulator High fidelity, non motion, Weapons Systems Trainer for full F-35B X X JSF Unique Classified(HIGH) mission employment pilot training.FFS Full Flight Simulator A high-fidelity motion-based training device that supports AH-1Z X X TEn (connects to(HIGH) 1000-6000 Level T&R training to include familiarization, UH-1Y ADVTE VIA TEn) networked and tactical flight operations, night vision, FLIR, MV-22 instrument, shipboard operations, and emergency procedures.FTD Flight Training Device A high-fidelity fixed-platform training device that supports AH-1Z X X TEn (connects to(HIGH) 1000-6000 Level T&R training to include familiarization, UH-1Y ADVTE VIA TEn) networked and tactical flight operations, night vision, FLIR, MV-22 instrument, shipboard operations, and emergency procedures.CFTD Containerized Flight A high-fidelity containerized training device that supports MV-22 X X TEn (connects to(HIGH) Training Device 1000-6000 Level T&R training to include familiarization, CH-53E/K ADVTE VIA TEn) networked and tactical flight operations, night vision, FLIR, AH-1Z instrument, shipboard operations, and emergency UH-1Y procedures. Note: Although the CFTD is considered a “non-motion” system, “secondary motion” is used to simulate the vibrations unique to helicopter flight, giving pilots additional cueing in certain regimes such as take-off and landing.TOFT Tactical Operational Provides training operation of the aircraft’s various systems, FA-18 X X Linked TOFTs at(HIGH) Flight Trainer normal and emergency procedures. Also provides training in Beaufort, Miramar and radar intercept, weapons delivery, radar imagery, radar Iwakuni. Will connect warning, high speed anti-radiation missile (HARM) system, to ADVTE via Navy A/G weapons delivery, and electronic attack. NASMP 1.4RNAWST Radar Night Attack Provides pilots with the ability to obtain training associated AV-8B X X TEn (will connect to(HIGH) Weapons System Trainer with both basic and advanced flight and mission tasks and to ADVTE VIA TEn operate the tactical and mission equipment including summer FY12) avionics and weapon systems within their full operating envelope in day and night modes of operation.TTT Team Tactics Trainer Fixed-base, aft cockpit (ECMO 2 and 3 positions) simulation EA-6B N/A N/A X Networked to Front(HIGH) station, and an instructor station. Provides basic weapon Seat Trainer. TEn system training for new flight crews and advanced implementation on proficiency training for combat qualifications. contract 13-6
    • SIMULATOR TRAINING SYSTEMS System Name Training Function RW FW Visuals Full Non- Network Capability (Fidelity) Motion MotionDMRT Deployable The DMRT is arranged internally with two side-by-side cockpits with F-35B X X JSF Unique Classified(HIGH) Mission an Out-The-Window (OTW) FOV 108°H x 50°V visual system. The Rehearsal DMRT uses the same mission system software as the aircraft and is a Trainer close comparable match to the larger land-based only Full Mission Simulator (FMS).OF/NT Operational Full fidelity simulation of the front cockpit (Pilot and ECMO 1 EA-6B X X Networked to Back Seat(HIGH) Flight/ positions). Includes a night-dusk-day visual system, 6 degree of Trainer. TEn Navigation freedom motion system, Digital Radar Landmass System, and off implementation on Trainer board instructor station. Supports air-to-air refueling, low level contract flight, and carrier operations.APT Aircrew Medium fidelity, non motion, Aircrew Procedures Trainer for full AH-1W KC-130T X X TEn (connects to ADVTE(MED/HIGH) Procedures mission employment pilot training UH-1N VIA TEn) Trainer CH-46E CH-53E VH-3D VH-60NOFT Operational Full featured training simulator with an out-the–window visual MH-53E C-130T X X TEn (connects to ADVTE(HIGH) Flight Trainer display system and a six-degree-of-freedom motion system. (Navy) (Navy) VIA TEn) Intended for general flight training as opposed to specialist tactics *MH-53E does not and weapons training. connect to ADVTECMS PTT Cockpit A PC-hosted desktop training device that utilizes high-fidelity aircraft MV-22 N/A N/A N/A N/A(LOW) Management software and flight vehicle simulations to support 1000 Level T&R System -Part training tasks to include cockpit familiarization, NATOPS start- Task Trainer up/shut-down checklists, and cockpit management system operation.CFS /WST Containerized A trailer mounted full fidelity simulation of the front cockpit (Pilot EA-6B X X Not TEn equipped(LOW) Flight Station/ and ECMO 1 positions) with an Instructor Station. Weapons System TrainerICLE Interactive A full-cockpit classroom training device that utilizes high-fidelity MV-22 N/A N/A N/A N/A(LOW) Cockpit aircraft software, flight vehicle simulations, and aircraft hardware Learning and controls to support 1000 Level T&R training tasks to include Environment cockpit familiarization, NATOPS start-up/shut-down checklists, cockpit management system operation, cockpit communications, CRM, and instrument flight.FuT Fuselage Containerized, non-motion, and fully encapsulated design. The KC-130T/J N/A N/A N/A N/A(LOW) Trainer Fuselage Trainer (FuT) is required to mirror the KC-130J cargo compartment in functionality to include a functional dual rail system capable of supporting normal loads and 463L pallets, two (2) operable winches, litter and seat setup, an operable cargo ramp and door, operable paratroop doors.MTT Multi-Task The MTT is a PC-based, deployable, part-task trainer with HOTAS AV-8B X N/A N/A N/A(LOW) Trainer and OTW (front) scene. Though originally a AN/APG-65 radar trainer, capabilities now include weapons, sensors, CAS and a full PVI representation. 13-7
    • MARINE COMMON AIRCREW TRAINER (MCAT) SYSTEM System Name Training Function RW Visuals Full Non- Network Capability Motion MotionMCAT Marine High fidelity, non motion, Weapons Systems Trainer for full CH-53E/K X X TEn (connects to ADVTE Common mission employment rear cabin Enlisted Aircrew training. MV-22 VIA TEn) Aircrew UH-1Y Trainer JOINT TERMINAL ATTACK CONTROLLER SIMULATOR SYSTEM System Name Training Function Visuals Full Non- Network Capability Motion MotionSAVT Supporting The SAVT trains indirect fire, call for fire, and Type I, II, and III X N/A X The SAVT currently a Arms Virtual Close Air Support (CAS) capabilities. In support of T&R stand-alone system; Trainer (SAVT) changes, simulation can be used to replace 33% of live fire future initiatives for events in support of currency training for Type I & II controls. TEn equipped and SAVT approved by JCAS ESC. ADVTE connection UAS SIMULATOR SYSTEM System Name Training Function Visuals Full Non- Network Capability Motion Motion RQ-7B Institutional Full replication of RQ-7B UAS Control Station. Sensor displays N/A N/A N/A TEn Implementation IMS Mission are fed by both terrain and simulated forces available in the FY12 (will connect IMS Simulator simulation database. Will include weapons fly out if platform #4 in Yuma to ADVTE is eventually armed. VIA TEn) MAINTENANCE TRAINERS 13-8
    • IWAKUNI(1ST MAW) F/A-18D TOFT F/A-18C TOFT (From Atsugi) USMC SIMULATOR LAYDOWN EA-6B WST(FY14) KANEOHE BAY (1ST MAW) MCGUIRE-DIX-LAKEHURST(4th MAW)FUTENMA(1ST MAW) KC-130J CPT(FY13) CH-53D WST(FY13) AH-1W APT KC-130J FuT(FY16) UH-1Y CFTD (FY14)CH-53E APT UH-1Y FTD(FY12) KC-130J OBST(FY16) AH-1Z CFTD (FY17)KC-130J WST AH-1Z FTD (FY16) F-35B FMS(CY14) CH-53E CFTD (FY15)CH-46E APT (FY15) MV-22 CFTD (FY13) F-35B FMS(CY14) CH-53/MV-22/UH-1 MCAT/CFTD(FY17)CH-53/MV-22 MCAT/CFTD(FY15) MV-22 CFTD (FY13) F-35B DMRT(CY14)MV-22 CFTD(FY11) CH-53E CFTD(FY12) F-35B DMRT(CY15)MV-22 CFTD(FY11) CH-53/MV-22/UH-1 MCAT/CFTD(FY14) CHERRY POINT(2d MAW) CH-53E EAET (FY12) AV-8B WST EA-6B OF/NT(FY14) AV-8B WST EA-6B TTT(FY20) PENDLETON(3d MAW) AV-8B WST EA-6B OT/NT(FY20) AH-1W WST STEWART ANGB (4th MAW) AV-8B MTTs(x15) EA-6B WST(FY20) AH-1Z FTD GUAM(1ST MAW) KC-130J CPT(FY13) KC-130J WST AH-1Z FFS TBD KC-130J WST(FY15) RQ-7 IMS UH-1Y FFS KC-130J FuT(FY17) HH-46E APT(FY19) UH-1Y CPT KC-130J OBST(FY17) EA-6B TTT(FY12) UH-1Y CPT KC-130J CPT(FY13) KC-130J FuT(FY16) AH-1Z CPT KC-130J OBST(FY16) KC-130J HH(FY17) AH-1Z CPT F-35B FMS(CY19) F-35B FMS(CY19) AH-1W APT 29 PALMS(3d MAW) Whidbey Island) QUANTICO F-35B FMS(CY19) F-35B FMS(CY19) CH-46E WST(FY17) EA-6B WST(USN) F-35B FMS(CY20) F-35B FMS(CY21) UH-1Y FTD(FY12) RQ-7 IMS VH-60N APT F-35B DMRT(CY19) F-35B DMRT(CY20) MV-22 CFTD(FY14) RQ-7 IMS VH-3D APT F-35B DMRT(CY21) F-35B DMRT(CY22) MV-22 CFTD(FY14) MV-22 CFTD(FY13) F-35B DMRT(CY23) F-35B DMRT(CY24) MV-22/UH-1 MCAT/CFTD(FY13) MV-22 CFTD(FY13) MV-22/UH-1 MCAT/CFTD(FY17) NEW RIVER(2d MAW) MV-22/UH-1 MCAT/CFTD(FY17) UH-1Y FTD UH-1Y/AH-1Z CMS(FY12) MV-22 FFS MV-22 FFS MIRAMAR(3d MAW) MV-22 FFS MV-22 CFTD KC-130J WST MV-22 FTD MV-22 CFTD F/A-18D TOFT BEAUFORT(2d MAW) MV-22 CFTD MV-22 CFTD F/A-18D TOFT F/A-18C TOFT MV-22 CFTD MV-22 CFTD F/A-18C TOFT F/A-18D TOFT MV-22 ICLE MV-22 CMS PTT F/A-18C TOFT F/A-18D TOFT MV-22 CMS PTT CH-53E WST F/A-18C TOFT F/A-18C TOFT CH-53E WST CH-53E APT F-35B FMS(CY13) CH-46E WST(FY13) YUMA(3d MAW) F-35B FMS(CY13) CH-53E APT AV-8B WST CH-53/CH-46 MCAT –P1/APT CH-53E CFTD (FY14) F-35B FMS(CY14) AV-8B WST WARNER ROBINS(4th MAW) F-35B FMS(CY14) CH-53E EAET CH-53K CFTD (FY20) FORT WORTH(4th MAW) AH-1W WST(FY19) AV-8B MTTs(x11) AH-1W APT(FY19) F-35B FMS(CY15) CH-53K CFTD (FY21) F/A-18C TOFT UH-1N APT(FY13) RQ-7 IMS F-35B FMS(CY16) KC-130J CPT(FY13) KC-130J FuT(FY16) C-130T OFT (USN) CH-46E CMT(FY19) F-35B FMS(CY12) F-35B FMS(CY16) KC-130J OBST(FY16) KC-130J HH(FY17) F-35B FMS(CY12) KC-130T APT 4th MAW (Other) F-35B FMS(CY16) UH-1Y FTD(FY13) CH-53/MV-22 MCAT- P2/APT(FY11) C-130T CPT(FY18) (USN) F-35B FMS (CY 22) (Location TBD) AH-1Z FTD(FY14) F-35B FMS(CY12) F-35B DMRT(CY14) CH-53/MV-22 MCAT/CFTD(FY15) KC-130J CPT(FY13) F-35B FMS (CY 22) (Location TBD) AH-1Z FTD(FY15) F-35B FMS(CY15) F-35B DMRT(CY15) CH-53/MV-22 MCAT/CFTD(FY15) KC-130J WST(FY16) MV-22 CFTD(FY14) (Location TBD) CH-53K CFTD(FY14) F-35B FMS(CY16) F-35B DMRT(CY16) CH-53E EAET (FY12) KC-130J FuT(FY17) MV-22 CFTD(FY14) (Location TBD) CH-53K CFTD(FY16) F-35B FMS(CY17) F-35B DMRT(CY18) F-35B FMS(CY17) F-35B FMS(CY19) KC-130 OBST(FY17) RQ-7 IMS(FY12) (Camp Pendleton) CH-53K CFTDFY17) F-35B DMRT(CY13) F-35B FMS(CY18) F-35B FMS(CY19) CH-53K CFTD(FY18) F-35B DMRT(CY13) F-35B FMS(CY18) F-35B FMS(CY20) CH-53K CFTD(FY19) F-35B DMRT(CY15) Note 1: Laydown does not depict future re-direction of systems F-35B DMRT(CY19) F-35B DMRT(CY22) CH-53/MV-22/UH-1 MCAT/CFTD(FY12) F-35B DMRT(CY16) (Reference platform specific simulator roadmaps). F-35B DMRT(CY20) F-35B DMRT(CY23) CH-53/MV-22/UH-1 MCAT/CFTD(FY16) F-35B DMRT(CY17) Note 2: External variables and newly identified requirements may F-35B DMRT(CY20) F35B DMRT(CY24) CH-53/MV-22/UH-1 MCAT/CFTD(FY17) F-35B DMRT(CY17) adjust projected “planned new build” strategy. MV-22 REAR CABIN PTT(FY12) Note 3: FY/CY identified represents year of planned funding CH-53E EAET (FY12)Legend execution. See platform specific simulator roadmaps for planned CH-53K AMSPTT (FY17) Existing Systems Planned New Build (#)=Planned execution year delivery dates. TBD Planned Device Disposal CH-53/MV-22/UH-1 MCAT/CFTD(FY18)(Location TBD) 13-9
    • MARINE AVIATION DISTRIBUTED VIRTUAL TRAINING ENVIRONMENT (ADVTE)Networked Training Live/Virtual/Constructive (LVC) GoalsNetworked training began with the execution of the Marine Corps Aviation Increased readiness using higher-fidelity networked simulators toSimulation Master Plan (MCASMP). Implementation began with a study for support T&R and LVC training.CONUS capability which concluded Nov 07. MATSS FOC will • Systems training capability outside of aircraft for section andincorporate Network Exercise Command Center (NECC) hubs, which will be division level training. linked to other MATSS, MEF simulation centers, and to the Joint National • Improved flight safety through enhanced CRM opportunities inTraining Capability (JNTC) through nationwide network infrastructure. These networked training. command posts will be used to develop, plan, rehearse, execute and review • Lower costs (in APN and OM&N).scenario-based network training sessions for air-to-air (ACE), air-to-ground • MAGTF integration.(MAGTF), for T&R credit, service-level, and joint exercise events. 13-10
    • MARINE AVIATION DISTRIBUTED VIRTUAL TRAINING ENVIRONMENT (ADVTE) 1st MAW 4st MAW Edwards NECC Quantico SAS MEF TECG TEn NECC MOC NECC NECC SAS SAVT MOC NECC NECC AV-8B JBDS UAS IMS ADVTE Equipment Description FUTURE ADVTE ADVTE is the USMCs Warfighter focused version of the USAF’s Phase Description DMON (Distributed Mission Operations Network) and USN’s NCTE (Navy Continuous Training Environment). Phase I Establishes initial connectivity between MCAS Cherry NECC Network Exercise Control Center (NECC) are configured per Point and MCAS New River. Installation of MCAS Cherry location and function as an exercise planning and control Point and MCAS New River NECCs. center, provides: 2D/3D visualizations of tactical entities; communication, joint brief/debrief capability, and VTC Phase II Establishes initial connectivity from MCAS Miramar and capability; integration point for DVTE; HLA/DIS protocol support MCAS Camp Pendleton to the ADVTE Cloud. Installation to facilitate Marine Air Command and Control System (MACCS) of MCAS Miramar and MCAS Camp Pendleton NECCs. participation in networked training events. Phase III Establishes initial connectivity from MCAS Beaufort, SAS System Administer Station (SAS) is a workstation location used MCAS Yuma, and MAGTFTC Twentynine Palms to the for network configuration management, Fault management and ADVTE Cloud. Installation of NECC equipment at MCAS NON -ADVTE Equipment Description network monitoring activities. Yuma and MCAS Beaufort. MOC F/A-18 (Training Systems) Mission Operations Center at MCAS Beaufort and MCAS MiramarTest IV (Phase Comprehensive Network Performance Assessment with IV) Simulators across all ADVTE Locations. AV-8B JBDS AV-8B Joint Brief/Debrief Station at MCAS Yuma UAS IMS Unmanned Aircraft System Institutional Mission Simulator SAVT Supporting Arms Virtual Trainer 13-11
    • MARINE AVIATION DISTRIBUTED VIRTUAL TRAINING ENVIRONMENT (ADVTE)• Aviation Distributed Virtual Training Environment (ADVTE) • Network Exercise Control Center (NECC) = Training System = Marine Aviation-specific network connectivity “Hub” - Provides instructor/operator and observer stations and Tactical Environment – ADVTE is an encrypted, closed-loop, persistent, simulation network under (TEn) functionality USMC administrative and operational control . - Provides 2D/3D visualization from any geographic location or tactical - Enables interoperability between multiple USMC Aviation Training Devices in environment entity. order to facilitate distributed mission training. - Provides simulated tactical radios with the ability to communicate on multiple - Provides capability to link and train virtually with other Services Joint Training nets, Point to Point VTC Capability. and Experimentation Network (JTEn) -(MAGTF GCE/USAF/Joint(JTEn) - Digitally capture for playback data streams from selectable audio and video - ADVTE Wide Area Network simulation data packet traffic moves across channels to support Joint Brief/De-Brief requirements. Homeland Defense Network (HDN) circuits and connects the base ATS training - Integrates with existing Deployable Virtual Training Environment (DVTE) locations. capability.• Homeland Defense Network (HDN) = Persistent Wide Area • Tactical Environment (TEn) = non-proprietary software Network circuits that all ADVTE data traffic (visual/audio) application that models a variety of threat systems, moves across sensors, and weapons.• Base Demarcation Point (DEMARK) = Provides the bridge - USMC “Owned” TEn provides doctrinally relevant, physics-based, real-time modeling and threat correlation. node to move off station - TEn is an HLA (High Level Architecture) compliant networking gateway with Federation Object Model (FOM) compatibility with both JFCOM and NASMP• NODE* = Secondary/Tertiary connection points (nodes) FOMs. used as required to bridge to DEMARK - Provides Simulator with capability to link to same site or offsite systems through the NECC. - TEn Version 4.0 or higher required for ADVTE connectivity ADVTE TEn Simulator 1 D TEn Simulator 1 N E D N Network Network E TEn Exercise O M HDN M O Exercise TEn Control D E A D E Control f Simulator 2 Center * A R * Center Simulator 2 K TEn R TEn Additional Additional Simulators K (Typical MCAS) SITE 1 SITE 2 Simulators NODE* * As Needed 13-12
    • MARINE CORPS COMMON VISUAL DATABASE (MCCVDb)Origins of MCCVDbThe concept of the Marine Corps Common Visual Database (MCCVDb) These standard formats support the exchange and reuse of commonoriginated from the Marine Corps Aviation Simulator Master Plan (MCASMP) datasets in simulators throughout the United States Navy, Marine Corps, andpolicy, which required all newly acquired simulators to function as a system Army, independently of the proprietary runtime software and databaseof tactically relevant networked trainers. The MCCVDb was initially format used in the image generators offered by vendors in the commercialdeveloped for and installed in a series of five Weapon Systems Trainers market. The reuse and updating of NPSI datasets results in significant cost(WST)s delivered to the USMC in the mid-90’s as a means to minimize reduction in the acquisition of simulator databases, contributes to databaseinteroperability issues among training systems. The term MCCVDb initially correlation (commonality) across USMC ATS trainers thereby minimizingreferred to, collectively, as the East Coast and West Coast United states interoperability issues during networked training events, and serves tovisual databases installed those same five Weapon Systems Trainers (WST)s. continue the evolution and relevance of the MCCVDb.The five trainers featured a common visual system solution which included acommon image generator (IG), display system, and run-time visual The MCCVDb provides ATS simulators with commonality with respect to thedatabases. The databases installed in each WST were exact copies of each following visual/sensor database content and features:other and were rendered and displayed by Image Generators and projectors •Geographic regionof the exact same make and model. As a result, the training scenes across •Terrain surface (terrain mesh and elevation)these five training systems looked very similar and each was truly correlated •Imagery (two dimensional surface features)to each other. That was the origin of the MCCVDb concept. •Fixed 3D features (buildings, vertical obstructions, etc.). •Landing Zones (LZs, CALs, etc) •Terrain Flight (TERF) routesPresent state of MCCVDb •Moving modelsThe current MCCVDb has evolved significantly and consists of a collection of •Material Attribution (not derived from NPSI)visual and sensor databases comprising various geographic regions both inand out of the continental United States (CONUS and OCONUS) that is Currently, the MCCVDb comprises of a set of stand-alone individualproduced from common source files. The MCCVDb is now a comprehensive databases corresponding to the following geographic regions:USMC Aviation Training System (ATS) visual database product consisting of 1. Eastern united Satescommon selected geographic regions installed and integrated, per specific 2. Western United Statesplatform training requirements, in nearly every USMC Aviation Training 3. West pacific (Westpac)System simulator. The MCCVDb products remain common, based on 4. Afghanistancommon source files. To enhance interoperability and minimize visual 5. Iraq and the Gulfdatabase correlation issues across networked trainers, commonality 6. Horn of Africa (HOA)between the visual and sensor databases is achieved to a large extent by the 7. Southeast Asia (4 Quadrants)reuse of “common” source datasets available from the NAVAIR Portable 8. Hawaii (under development)Source Initiative (NPSI) repository. NPSI is a NAVAIR (PMA-205) funded 9. Other regions (small DBs)service that collects, inspects, catalogues, stores, and distributes refinedsource data to be used in the development of simulator visual and sensordatabases. NPSI also provides guidelines based on commercially acceptedstandard formats for the various source data types used to publish runtimedatabases. 13-13
    • MARINE CORPS COMMON VISUAL DATABASE (MCCVDb) FIGURE 1: Approximate Extents of MCCVDb geographic regionsThe outlined boxes in the map above represent the approximate extents of the main geographic regions currently covered by the MCCVDb. 13-14
    • MARINE CORPS COMMON VISUAL DATABASE (MCCVDb) MCCVDb database geographic region key code for AvPlan The table below provides the proposed key code to be used in the platform specific aircrew training systems and the list of database geographic regions installed in each USMC ATS training device. Visual Data Base Database Geographic Area Name General geographic region and countries/cities included Key CodeNumeric Alphabetic 1 EUSA Eastern United States Eastern United States 2 WUSA Western United States Western United States 3 WPAC West Pacific Japan, Korean Peninsula 4 Iraq Iraq and the Gulf Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, Northern Oman, United Arab Emirates, Persian Gulf, Arabian Gulf, Strait of Hormuz, Gulf of Oman, 5 Afgh Afghanistan Most of Afghanistan, Northwestern Pakistan, South Eastern Turkmenistan, Southern Tajikistan 6 HOA Horn of Africa Yemen, Somalia, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, Northern Kenya, Read sea, Gulf of Aden. 7 SEA South East Asia Northern Australia, Indonesia, Philippines, Taiwan, Mainland Southeast Asia (i.e. Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia, Singapore), part of southeast China. (delivered as four separate quadrants) 8 Hawi Hawaiian islands Includes Hawaii, Maui, Lanai, Molokai, Oahu, Kauai, and Nihau (principal islands) 9 MWTC Bridgeport Mountain USMC Mountain Warfare Training Center, Bridgeport Mountain, CA (winter version) 10 Pend Camp Pendleton High resolution imagery limited to MCB Camp Pendleton area provided as an inset in FSI’s CONUS Database 11 CONUS Continental U.S. Entire continental U.S. developed by L-3 Link for the F-18 trainers common visual database 12 NEUS Northeast United Sates Northeastern United States (NC, WV, VA, PA, MD, NJ, NY, MA, VT, NH) 13 Kirt Kirtland AFB Kirtland Air Force Base and vicinity (small database - approximately one geocell) 14 Alsk Alaska KC-130J database from Air Force (runtime only) includes: portions of Alaska 15 Okin Okinawa Island of Okinawa only (does not include mainland Japan or Korean peninsula) 16 Med Mediterranean Southeastern France (small database – approx. 1 geocell training area surrounded by 1 geocell generic area skirt) 17 Pnma Panama Panama Canal, cities of Panama and Colon (small database –1 geocell tng. Area surrounded by 1 geocell skirt area) 18 Nrwy Norway Northern Norway (small database – approx. 1 geocell training area surrounded by 1 geocell generic area skirt) 19 Hait Haiti KC-130J database from Air Force (runtime only) includes: Haiti 20 Aust Australia KC-130J database from Air Force (runtime only) includes: Parts of Australia 21 Japn Japan KC-130J database from Air Force (runtime only) includes: Japanese mainland excluding Okinawa 22 MA#1 USAF Mission Area 1 KC-130J database from Air Force (runtime only) includes: Little Rock AFB, Kessler AB, AR, MS, LA) 23 MA#2 USAF Mission Area 2 KC-130J database from Air Force (runtime only) includes: Southwest U.S. (partial areas of CA, NV, AZ, NM, CO) 24 MA#3 USAF Mission Area 3 KC-130J database from Air Force (runtime only) includes: Afghanistan 25 MA#4 USAF Mission Area 4 KC-130J database from Air Force (runtime only) includes: Undisclosed location 26 MA#5 USAF Mission Area 5 KC-130J database from Air Force (runtime only) includes: Korean peninsula (north Korea, south Korea) 27 WDC Washington DC Washington DC and vicinity (small database - approximately six geocells) 28 NYC New York New York City and vicinity (small database - approximately four geocells) 29 MWTE North-Midwest Urban Training Northern-Midwest Urban Training Environment includes city of Chicago and vicinity Environment (small database - approximately sixteen geocells) 30 WUTE Western US- Urban Training Western USA/Southern California urban training Environment includes city of Los Angeles (small database - Environment approximately sixteen Geocells) 31 SEUS Southeast United States Southeastern U.S. includes portions of FL, AL, LA, KY, NC, GA 00 Other Other small databases – runtime only – 13-15
    • H-1 AIRCREW TRAINING SYSTEMS ROADMAP APMTS: Mark Elliott PH: 301-995-2789 e-mail: mark.elliott@navy.mil Type Last Tech Ref FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 T/M/S COG Name Db TEN IA Cert Sim Date 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4CAMP PENDLETONAH-1W WST 2F136A-2 PSI/NPSI Note-1 v4.0 Oct 2005 Aug 2011AH-1W APT 2F170-1 Ft. Rucker Note-3 v4.0 Mar 2005 2012AH-1Z FTD 2F197-1 NPSI Note-2 v4.0 New 2013AH-1Z FFS 2F215 NPSI Note-2 v4.0 New 2013UH-1N WST 2F161 NPSI Note-2 v4.0 Nov 2010 Not ReqdUH-1Y FTD 2F196B-2 NPSI Note-2 v4.0 New (Lot 3) 2013UH-1Y FFS 2F206 NPSI Note-2 v4.0 New 2013UH-1Y CPT 2C84 N/A N/A New Sep 2011AH-1Z CPT 2C83 N/A N/A New Sep 2011UH-1Y CPT 11H184 N/A N/A New Sep 2011AH-1Z CPT 11H185 N/A N/A New Sep 2011Y/Z CMS TBD TBD TBD New TBDNEW RIVERAH-1W WST 2F136A-1 PSI/NPSI Note-1 v4.0 Oct 2005 May 2010UH-1Y FTD 2F196-1 NPSI Note-2 v4.0 New 2011AH-1Z FTD 2F197B-2 NPSI Note-2 v4.0 New (Lot 3) 2016UH-1Y FTD 2F196B-4 NPSI Note-2 v4.0 New (Lot 4) 2016AH-1Z FTD 2F197B-3 NPSI Note-2 v4.0 New (Lot 4) 2018UH-1N APT 2F175 NPSI Note-2 v4.0 Jul 2008 Jun 2010WARNER ROBINS AFBAH-1W APT 2F170-2 NPSI Note-2 v4.0 Mar 2005 In WorkJB MCGUIRE-DIX-LAKEHURSTAH-1W WST 2F136 NPSI Note-2 v4.0 Oct 2005 In WorkAH-1W APT 2F170-3 NPSI Note-2 v4.0 Mar 2005 In WorkUH-1Y CFTD 2F196B-5 NPSI Note-2 v4.0 New (Lot 4) 2017AH-1Z CFTD 2F197B-5 NPSI Note-2 v4.0 New (Lot 4) 2020KANEOHE BAYAH-1W APT 2F170-1 NPSI Note-2 v4.0 Jan 2012 In WorkUH-1Y FTD 2F196B-3 NPSI Note-2 v4.0 New (Lot 3) 2014AH-1Z FTD 2F197B-4 NPSI Note-2 v4.0 New (Lot 4) 2019Roadmap Legend Trainer Operational Note 1: VITAL-9 Image Generator (IG) with gaming areas: EC, WC, NY, Bridgeport,Okinawa, Mediterranean, Panama, and Norway New Build Note 2: VITAL-X IG with gamng areas : NPSI (EC, WC, Bridgeport, Iraq, Afghanistan) Trainer Down for Mod/Upgrade Note 3: Aechelon IG with gaming areas: NPSI (EC, WC, WestPac, Iraq, Afghanistan, Southeast Asia, and Horn of Africa Planned Device Disposal Trainer Relocation 13-16
    • MV-22 AIRCREW TRAINING SYSTEMS ROADMAP APMTS: Incoming July 2011 PH: (301) 757-8157 e-mail: Last FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 Type Sim COG Name Db TEn IA Cert Tech 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4NEW RIVER Ref FFS #1 2F182 NPSI, Note 2 v4.0 2008 2010 FFS #2 2F182 NPSI, Note 2 v4.0 2008 2011 FFS #3 2F182 NPSI, Note 2 v4.0 2011 2011 FTD #1 2F183 NPSI, Note 2 v4.0 2011 2011 CFTD #1 2F200 NPSI, Note 2 v4.0 2011 2010 CFTD #6 2F200 NPSI, Note 2 v4.0 2010 2010 ICLE 2F212 N/A v4.0 2011 -CMS PTT #1 2C81 N/A N/A 2009 -MIRAMAR CFTD #2 2F200 NPSI, Note 2 v4.0 2009 2009 CFTD #3 2F200 NPSI, Note 2 v4.0 2009 2009 CFTD #4 2F200 NPSI, Note 2 v4.0 2010 2009 CFTD #5 2F200 NPSI, Note 2 v4.0 2010 2009CMS PTT #2 2C81 N/A N/A 2009 -FUTENMA CFTD #7 2F200 New Build Oct CFTD #8 2F200 New Build NovQUANTICO/HMX-1 CFTD #9 2F200 New Build Jan CFTD #10 2F200 New Build AprKANEOHE BAY CFTD #11 2F200 New Build Sep CFTD #12 2F200 New Build NovCAMP PENDLETON CFTD #13 2F200 New Build Mar CFTD #14 2F200 New Build Jun4TH MAW CFTD #15 2F200 New Build Oct CFTD #16 2F200 New Build Jan Note 1: VITAL-9 Image Generator (IG) with gaming areas: EC, WC, NY, Bridgeport,Okinawa, Mediterranean, Panama, and Norway Note 2: VITAL-X IG with gamng areas : NPSI (EC, WC, Bridgeport, Iraq, Afghanistan) Note 3: Aechelon IG with gaming areas: NPSI (EC, WC, WestPac, Iraq, Afghanistan, Southeast Asia, and Horn of Africa *Notes* (These databases include:) 1 - NY, Okinawa, Mediterranean, Panama and Norway 2 - East & West Coasts, Bridgeport, Afghanistan and Iraq 3 - Pendleton, Atlanta and New Orleans Roadmap Legend Trainer Operational New Build Trainer Down for Mod/Upgrade Planned Device Disposal Trainer Relocation 13-17
    • CH-53D/E AIRCREW TRAINING SYSTEMS ROADMAP Training IPTL: Maj Kate E. Fleeger PH: 301 757-0827 e-mail: kate.e.fleeger@navy.mil COG Last Tech FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 T/M/S TYPE SIM Db TEn IA Cert Name Ref Date 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 NEW RIVER CH-53E WST 2F174-1 NPSI v4.0 May 08 Dec 09 Oct Jan CH-53E APT 2F190-1 NPSI v4.0 Dec 10 Jul CH-53E EAET TBD TBD TBD NA New Build Oct FUTENMA CH-53E APT 2F171 NPSI v3.2 May 10 Oct MIRAMAR CH-53E WST 2F174-2 NPSI v4.0 May 08 Jul Oct CH-53E APT 2F190-2 NPSI v4.0 Aug 11 CH-53E CFTD 2F-TBD TBD TBD NA New Build Oct CH-53E EAET TBD TBD TBD NA New Build Oct KANEOHE BAY CH-53D WST 2F121 NPSI v3.2 May 07 Oct CH-53E CFTD & EAET 2F220 TBD v4.0 NA New Build Jun Oct CH-53E APT 2F190-2 NPSI v3.2 May 07 Oct JB MCGUIRE-DIX-LAKEHURST CH-53E CFTD 2F-TBD TBD TBD NA New Build Oct CH-53K AIRCREW TRAINING SYSTEMS ROADMAP Training IPTL: Maj Kate E. Fleeger PH: 301 757-0827 e-mail: kate.e.fleeger@navy.mil FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 T/M/S TYPE SIM 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 NEW RIVER CH-53K CFTD New Build Oct CH-53K CFTD New Build Mar CH-53K CFTD Jul New Build Mar CH-53K CFTD New Build Mar CH-53K CFTD New Build Mar CH-53K AMSPTT New Build Jan MIRAMAR CH-53K CFTD New Build CH-53K CFTD New BuildRoadmap Legend Trainer Operational New Build Trainer Down for Mod/Upgrade Planned Device Disposal Trainer Relocation 13-18
    • Roadmap Legend Trainer Operational New Build Trainer Down for Mod/Upgrade Planned Device Disposal Trainer Relocation 13-19
    • 13-20
    • AV-8B AIRCREW TRAINING SYSTEMS ROADMAP APMTS: Brian Trago PH: 407-380-4719 e-mail: brian.trago@navy.mil Last Tech FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 T/M/S Type Sim COG Name Db Ten IA Cert Ref 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4CHERRY POINTAV-8B WST 2F150A NPSI Note-2 v4.0 ongoingAV-8B WST 2F150C NPSI Note-2 v4.0 Mar-11AV-8B WST 2F150E NPSI Note-2 v4.0 May 10YUMAAV-8B WST 2F150D NPSI Note-2 v4.0 Dec 09AV-8B WST 2F150B NPSI Note-2 v4.0 Dec-10Roadmap Legend Note 1: VITAL-9 Image Generator (IG) with gaming areas: EC, WC, NY, Bridgeport,Okinawa, Mediterranean, Panama, and Norway Trainer Operational Note 2: VITAL-X IG with gamng areas : NPSI (EC, WC, Bridgeport, Iraq, Afghanistan) New Build Note 3: Aechelon IG with gaming areas: NPSI (EC, WC, WestPac, Iraq, Afghanistan, Southeast Asia, and Horn of Africa Trainer Down for Mod/Upgrade Planned Device Disposal 13-21 Trainer Relocation
    • USMC EA-6B AIRCREW TRAINING SYSTEMS ROADMAP APMTS: John Potts PH: 301-904-2615 e-mail: john.potts@navy.mil Last Tech FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 T/M/S Type Sim COG Name Db Ten IA Cert Ref 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4WHIDBEY ISLANDEA-6B WST(USN) 2F187 N/A XFER TO CHP?CHERRY POINTEA-6B OF/NT 2F185 FY10EA-6B TTT 15E43 FY11EA-6B WST 2F187EA-6B OF/NT 2F143 v4.0 FY08EA-6B TTT 15E22C N/AEA-6B WST 2F188 N/AIWAKUNIEA-6B WST 2F178 N/A FY10Roadmap Legend Trainer Operational New Build Trainer Down for Mod/Upgrade Planned Device Disposal Trainer Relocation 13-22
    • 13-23
    • SECTION 14 --- MARINE AVIATION LOGISTICS PLANMarine Aviation Logistics Support Plan (MALSP) 14-2Aviation Logistics Transformation 14-3Aviation Logistics Transformation: End-to-End Alignment 14-4Aviation Logistics Transformation: MALSP II 14-5Aviation Logistics Transformation: Enablers 14-6Aviation Logistics Transformation: Information Technology (IT) Strategy 14-7Aircraft Material Condition & RESET Program 14-8 14-1
    • MARINE AVIATION LOGISTICS SUPPORT PROGRAM (MALSP)MALSP: Contingency Support Package (CSP) Descriptions:MALSP was the foundation of support for the Marine ACE during Fly-In Support Package (FISP) – The FISP provides organizational-level remove-and-Operations DESERT SHIELD and DESERT STORM, and it has continued replace spare parts to support the initial 30 days’ sorties at combat flying hourto support the ACE in Iraq and Afghanistan. utilization rates. The FISP is deployed with the fly-in echelon (FIE) and/or flight ferry (FF) of the deploying ACE and is critical to enabling initial combatCSPs identify aviation logistics support for Marine contingency operations.requirements. CSPs provide the necessary people, supportequipment (SE), mobile facilities (MFs) and spare/repair parts for each Common CSP (CCSP) – The follow-on to the FISP and/or RESP, the CCSP is theMAG/MALS. The spare/repair parts are computed at the combat baseline core capability of the intermediate-level support of the deployingutilization rate for a 90 day duration. CSPs ensure that adequate Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron (MALS). The CCSP is subdivided into fixed-common and peculiar support is available for separate/sustained and rotary-wing CCSPs.operational commitments when attached to a “host” MALS.The Remote Expeditionary Support Package (RESP) is the most Peculiar CSP (PCSP) – Also a follow-on to the FISP, the PCSP is unique to the type/model/series aircraft (number and type) and combines with the CCSP totailorable element of MALSP, consisting of the FISP, people, MF, and form the MALS intermediate-level capability. CCSPs and PCSPs combine toSE for a thirty-day duration. In order to capture the composition of a provide 90 days of combat flying hours depth of sustainment.RESP, a workbook has been designed for each T/M/S aircraft. Eachworkbook will capture data that will enable planners to access quickly Follow-On Support Package (FOSP) – The FOSP is a deployable intermediate-levelthe 80% solution for current and future deployments alike. Each capability that due to its size and footprint may be phased to a theater ofcurrent readiness T/M/S team lead will be responsible for the input operation, depending on mission requirements and mission duration.and upkeep of the respective RESP workbooks. Training Support Allowance (TSA) – The TSA is a thirty-day support packageIt is critically important during our transformation to MALSP II that specifically tailored to support a Fleet Replacement Squadron. As such, the TSACSPs and the RESP concept leverage all AIRSpeed lessons learned to does not deploy.increase aviation readiness and the flexibility and effectiveness ofaviation logistics support. Remote Expeditionary Support Package (RESP) – The RESP combines with FISP spares and provides personnel, SE, and additional MFs tailored to sustain the ACE during the first thirty days of operations until the CSPs arrive in theater. MEU Expeditionary Support Package (MESP) – The MESP are O-level -only spare parts packages built to a standard MEU deckload at a 30-day combat utilization rate. MESPs are owned, accounted for, stored, and managed at MALS designated by HQMC ASL. Deployment of a MESP requires the MEU Commander to request sourcing from the applicable Marine Forces (MARFOR). MARFORs, with concurrence of the Theater Commander, will direct MESP reconstitution and redeployment upon completion of the operation. 14-2
    • AVIATION LOGISTICS TRANSFORMATIONMarine Corps aviation logistics continues to transform its business MALSP II is transforming Marine Aviation’s logistics capability frompractices and processes through End-to-End (E2E) Alignment. As a a historical data based “push” system to a modern demand drivencenterpiece of the USMC Aviation Transformation Strategy, E2E “pull” system. MALSP II, with its focus on decreasing forwardAlignment directly impacts the underlying processes that support logistics footprint and increasing logistics chain responsiveness andcurrent readiness goals and objectives from CONUS sites to austere performance, is beginning to evolve as a critical enabler of Marineexpeditionary environments. E2E Alignment provides the Aviation operations widely distributed across uncertain austeresquadron commander with a “systems of systems” approach to expeditionary operational environments. During 2011, MALSP IIplanning, scheduling, and executing the Sortie Based Training focused on completing a demand-pull nodal logistics proof ofProgram (SBTP) in order to achieve greater levels of core concept (POC) in the Horn of Africa (HOA) region, obtaining andcompetency and ultimately, increased combat power. A focused sustaining critical information technology (IT) known as theand vigorous Continuous Process Improvement (CPI) program, E2E Expeditionary Pack-Up Kit (EPUK) for detached and deployedharnesses “best of breed” practices from the Theory of Constraints operations. The MALSP II Project Office is also working with the(TOC) and Lean Six Sigma (LSS) in order to institutionalize demand- NAE Aviation Allowance Working Group (AAWG) on the future ofpull logistics across the entire aviation logistics chain in support of logistics inventory allowancing processes and procedures inoperational requirements. support of the Deputy Commandant for Aviation’s MALSP II’s initial operational capability goal of not later than the end of theE2E’s focus on the production and replenishment of “Ready fourth quarter of FY 2014.Mission Sets” by Marine Aviation Logistics Squadrons, organicdepots, and original equipment manufacturers establishes The Marine Corps aviation and ground logistics communities haveconditions for successful migration toward the Marine Aviation embarked on different, but similar logistics transformation andLogistics Support Program II (MALSP II). In linking the critical modernization efforts in an effort to better support currentinitiatives of E2E Alignment and MALSP II together, Marine aviation operational demands, find efficiencies required to maintainis postured to support legacy, transition, and future platforms. capability with fewer resources, and to be better prepared for an uncertain future. Aviation’s MALSP II and the ground logisticsOver the past year, the E2E Alignment process was initiated at five modernization (LogMod) efforts, while necessarily unique in somesquadron sites, with seven other squadrons progressing towards aspects, present opportunities for alignment, interface, inter-actual implementation of the Designs. E2Eis scheduled for operability, and integration that will improve the overallimplementation in at least four new squadrons during the coming performance of the MAGTF. MAGTF logistics integration (MLI)year, while also being completed in the remainder of squadrons seeks to identify and exploit these opportunities in ways that willcurrently in the Design phase. E2E Alignment continues to gain positively impact logistic support to naval forces. MLI provides amomentum across Marine Aviation and will enable all of the forum for constant and dynamic engagement between the twosupporting logistics agencies that will support MALSP II “pull” logistics communities, and a pathway to the ultimate goal of bettersystems across nodal logistics support chains. support to the warfighter. 14-3
    • AVIATION LOGISTICS TRANSFORMATION: END-TO-END (E2E) ALIGNMENTE2E Alignment is AVLOGs fundamental new business process. It isbased on CPI concepts that combine proven TOC and LSS E2E - Synchronizing the Logistics Chainmethodologies into a fully integrated and cohesive solution set.E2E is the key process enabler for CR and MALSP II. It is aligned tothe Marine Corps Vision and Strategy 2025 and the MaritimeStrategy. It also supports Naval Aviation Enterprise (NAE), MarineAviation Executive Readiness Board (MAERB) andtype/model/series team goals.E2E is an integrated application of TOC and LSS to improve theeffectiveness and efficiency of Marine Aviation Organizational (O),Intermediate (I), and Depot (D) level units. Implementation of thisnew business process at the MALS was the first step. E2Eencompasses a holistic view of Marine aviation, which includesgarrison flight lines, depot artisans, NAE logistics providers,deployed Operating Bases, Enroute Support Bases (ESB) andParent Marine Aviation Logistics Squadrons (PMALS). E2E alignsand synchronizes all supporting activities towards common currentreadiness goals, which provides highly reliable, flexible andeffective logistics support capability to Marine aviation operationalcore capable units.E2E Alignment is implemented to a keenly developed ‘blueprint’ E2E is firmly fixed in our institution. It is gaining momentum asbased on the TOC, demand-pull logistics, and buffer management Marine Aviation fully understands the returns on investments inprinciples. It is underpinned by focused and aggressive CPI applied stabilizing O-level activities’ consumption demand signals and sharingacross the entire Marine Corps, in efforts to identify and eliminate this critical information across a synchronized demand-pull logisticswaste, variation, and redundancy. system. E2E at its mature end-state will support current readiness goals, set conditions for supporting core capable units in austereE2E Alignment is deployed aggressively across Marine Aviation expeditionary environments via MALSP II, and ultimately providewith current focus centered on designs and implementations at Marine Aviation with exceptional world-class logistics supportflying squadrons. One type model series (T/M/S) has been capability it demands.completed, and three T/M/S are currently underway to date with agoal to engage all T/M/S by FY2014. 14-4
    • AVIATION LOGISTICS TRANSFORMATION: MALSP IIMarine Aviation is transforming to posture itself for operations in MALSP IInew and uncertain austere expeditionary environments. MarineAviation Logistics (AVLOG) is aligning its concepts of operations andsupport to ensure it is ready to meet both current and futurechallenges across the range of military operations. AVLOGprovides organizational and intermediate levels of aviationmaintenance, supply, ordnance, and avionics support to the ACE.AVLOG’s strategy to improve its responses to requirements isbased on the successful parallel design, implementation of E2EAlignment, and synchronization with MALSP II.MALSP II is AVLOG’s austere expeditionary logistics support andsustainment solution to new and demanding requirements. Itsupports Marine Corps Vision and Strategy 2025, and the MaritimeStrategy. MALSP II transforms austere expeditionary aviationlogistic support capabilities by providing more responsive, agile,flexible and sustainable solutions through properly sized forwardoperational footprints that are synchronized across a demand-pullnodal logistics chain. This will ensure the ACE and MAGTF aresupported across the range of military operations (ROMO). two Aviation Logistics Support (T-AVB) Ships, Maritime Prepositioning Force (MPF) ships, Marine Corps Prepositioning Program - Norway (MCPP-N) assets,MALSP II alignment and synchronization with E2E relies upon CPI and future Geographic Prepositioning Program (GPP) capability for aviationinitiatives of LSS, TOC and demand “pull” buffer management, support equipment.monitoring, analyzing and adjusting principles instead of the legacyscheduled “push” system of the past. The nodes in a MALSP II In 2010, an ESB was established in Bahrain to support a MALSP II demand-pulldemand-pull nodal logistics chain may include the PMALS; an nodal logistics chain proof of concept (POC). This POC is supporting aEnroute Support Base (ESB); a Main Operating Base (MOB); and a detachment of USMC CH-53Es at the Horn of Africa (HOA). The demand-pullForward Operating Base (FOB). MALSP II’s maintenance concept is nodal logistics chain consists of a PMALS (MALS-29), an ESB in Bahrain, and theto conduct all non-essential intermediate level maintenance at the FOB in HOA. This POC has: measured performance; refined buffer sizing andPMALS, and only deploy limited maintenance capability to forward management methodologies; leveraged and tested transportation networksnodes in response to requirements not met by material and time for speed and reliability; introduced and tested new logistics informationbuffers. During high intensity conflicts, the MALSP II demand-pull technologies such as the Expeditionary Pack-Up Kit (EPUK); developed thenodal logistics chain may be augmented with maintenance doctrine and standard operating procedures required to identify, select, stand-capability, material and time buffers from: up, and operate an ESB; and identified additional requirements related to MALSP II. Plans are to expand on the POC success with initial roll-out of new capability during 2011 and 2012 in support of aviation operations in the CENTCOM AOR. Introduction of the new demand-pull nodal logistics chain is on the way to initial operational capability (IOC) no later than 4Q FY14. 14-5
    • AVIATION LOGISTICS TRANSFORMATION: ENABLERSAviation Logistics Support Ship – T-AVBUSMC aviation currently employs two dedicated AviationLogistics Support Ships (T-AVBs). The ships providededicated sealift capability for the rapid movement of theUSMC aviation intermediate level (I-level) maintenancefacilities to sustain fixed and rotary-wing aircraft. The hulllife for these two ships expires in 2019 and 2020respectively, resulting in potential critical capability loss forMarine aviation. The future T-AVB represents AVLOG’sinitiative to plan for and ensure this critical capability ismaintained. AVLOG’s future T-AVB activities are focused onvalidating future requirements ensuring continuation of Geographic Prepositioning Program – GPPfunding support. Forward geographic prepositioning of equipment is an HQMC initiative which is fully complementary to MALSP II and its family of systems. GPP uses forwardMaritime Prepositioning Force – MPF (T) operating sites, and a diverse array of more austere cooperative security locationsThe MPF is currently a deployment option optimized for to preposition equipment and supplies in critical regions and along keyMajor Combat Operations (MCO). Ship loads, concepts of transportation routes. This concept is an important aspect of the MALSP II doctrineemployment, and the notional Marine Expeditionary Brigade as it will ensure that equipment and supplies are available to support and sustain(MEB) structure are all oriented toward the MCO. A rapid deployment of the ACE. AVLOG will fully embrace and support the GPPcomprehensive approach of modernizing the MPF is required initiative and leverage its capability to enable the success of E2E AIRSpeed andto ensure this strategic capability will better support current MALSP II.and future requirements of the Geographic CombatantCommander’s (GCC). MPF Transition, MPF (T) will Expeditionary Delivery System – EDSincorporate the use of three Break Bulk Supply and The MALSP II doctrine demands a highly flexible and responsive delivery system forAmmunition (T-AKE) ships as well as the introduction of the aviation maintenance repair facilities, parts, supplies and support equipment. TheMobile Loading Platform (MLP). Expeditionary Delivery System (EDS) will satisfy this requirement with a delivery solution which is comprised of a stronger, light weight and modular family of containers and support packages. Key components of the system include standardization, scalability, right sized modules and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) compatibility, features which will facilitate organic lift and handling capabilities and ultimately satisfy the fundamental requirements for flexibility, agility and rapid response. AVLOG will participate in the evolution of EDS and leverage its concept to ensure its capability is an integral part of the overall MALSP II solution. 14-6
    • AVIATION LOGISTICS TRANSFORMATION: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT) STRATEGYMarine Aviation Logistics Enterprise Information Technology (MAL-EIT) Navy Tactical Command Support Systems (NTCSS)IT is a critical transformation enabler of AVLOG expeditionary Introduced in Apr 1995, NTCSS is a multi-application program providingcapabilities and will serve as a forcing function throughout the transition standardized tactical support information systems capability to afloat, deployed,process. MAL-EIT is the suite of future AVLOG IT tools required for and shore-based Navy and Marine Corps activities. NTCSS incorporates Aviation,employment of new MALSP II austere expeditionary capabilities. MAL- Surface, and Subsurface Maintenance, Supply, Inventory, Finance, andEIT Initial Operational Capability (IOC) is planned for no later than (NLT) Administrations. NTCSS is the primary automated logistics system supporting4QFY14 and Full Operational Capability (FOC) NLT 4QFY16. Marine Aviation. The USMC version of NTCSS is fully deployable and capable of supporting the ACE’s Intermediate Logistics needs in any theater of operation. ItIOC NLT 4QFY14 (One Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron) also provides O-level squadrons with automated maintenance management capability ashore, afloat, or forward deployed. NTCSS supports the MarineExpeditionary Pack-Up Kit (EPUK): the detached and deployed Aviation Logistics Support Program (MALSP and MALSP II) and includes theexpeditionary requisitioning capability that provides issue/stow/receipt, following functionality:automated data entry into NALCOMIS, and near-real-time data exchangewith up-line tiered repositories via Gateway Servers for core capable Relational Supply (RSupply)units deployed in austere expeditionary environments. Is the system for supply control, requirements processing, parts ordering and tracking, inventory management, and financial management.Next Generation Buffer Management System (NGEN BMS): an integratedweb based tool developed to manage and monitor in near-real-time both Optimized Intermediate Maintenance Activity (OIMA) Naval Aviation Logisticsphysical and time buffers across the MALSP II demand-pull nodal logistics Command/Management Information System (NALCOMIS)chains. Is the day-to-day maintenance management tool for Intermediate level production control, Quality Assurance, Supply, History Retrieval, AssetNGEN BMS Interface with AIRSpeed Analysis Tool (AAT): ability to analyze Management Operational Readiness Reports, and includes individual repairableplanned versus actual time and physical buffers in near-real-time across components requisition and documentation.the MALSP II demand-pull nodal logistics chains, analyze multipletransportation patterns to understand how they are performing, convey Optimized Organizational Maintenance Activity (OOMA) Naval Aviation Logisticsbuffer health status information between nodes and the P-MALS, and Command/Management Information System (NALCOMIS)provide the P-MALS alerts when there are vulnerabilities in designed Is the day-to-day maintenance management tool for aviation squadrons and othertime and physical buffers due to insufficiencies. O-level maintenance activities that provides Flight Data Recording, Asset Management, Maintenance Control, Quality Assurance, Logs and Records –FOC NLT 4QFY16 (Thirteen Marine Aviation Logistics Squadrons) Technical Publications that encompasses end items such as aircraft, repairables and equipment component repair. The current release of version 5.11 interfacesLogistics Planning Tool (LPT): identifies initial outfitting of material for with F-AME (F-18 Automated Maintenance Environment) the F-18 smart aircraftdeployments, automates container and pallet configuration entries for application, to provide enhanced tracking of critical data.TPFDD, automates Remote Expeditionary Support Package (RESP) andContingency Support Package (CSP) development and planning. NTCSS Way Forward The current release of NTCSS (Viking) is migrating the Intermediate MaintenanceOptimizer: modeling to determine initial MALSP II demand-pull nodes for Activity (IMA) applications to a Common Operating Environment (LINUX) as welloptimal distribution and buffering based on demand history (NIIN by as providing a complete hardware refresh. Nineteen MALS and COOPs wereNIIN), determines starting list of parts per contingency scenario. completed during FY 2010 -11. The Viking Upgrade provides a new ISO Certified Mobile Facility to all deployable USMC aviation units. 14-7
    • AIRCRAFT MATERIAL CONDITION & RESET PROGRAMAircraft Material Condition RESET Program VisionThe responsibility to maintain, preserve, and enhance the Enhance the material condition of USMC aircraft and reduce thecapability of aircraft rests with O-level squadrons and I-level maintenance burden on our Marines using a holistic approach:activities that provide essential aviation logistics support. • Develop the process for requirements determination.Professionally maintained and ‘healthy’ aircraft will promote • Include specification development, budgeting, contracting, scheduling, andsafe operations and ensure maximum aircraft reliability, execution.performance, and combat capability. To that end, aircraft • Develop performance metrics, policy and plans.material condition goals and a standardized policy of limitingoutstanding maintenance discrepancies for each T/M/S aircraft Current Situationare directed. Source selection during Dec 08/ Jan 09 resulted in selection of two primary contractors, Defense Support Systems (DS2) and PKL Services (PKL):Aircraft Material Condition Goals• Maintains all squadrons at 100% PMAI. Lot 1: F/A-18, EA-6B, AV-8B performed by DS2• Achieve readiness goals for MC/FMC rates as specified in Lot 2: KC-130J performed by DS2CNAFINST 4790.2 series Chapter 17.2.1. Lot 3: AH-1W, UH-1N, CH-53D/E performed by PKL• Adhere to depot level induction requirements. Lot 4: CH-46E performed by PKL• Increase priority of corrosion prevention and treatment.• Ensure “A” status aircraft do not remain in non-flying status Five year contract (Base contract plus nine six month options).for more than sixty days (aircraft should be flown before sixtydays elapse.) RESET Program Elements• Require annual training for aircrew and maintenancepersonnel in corrosion identification and prevention. PRESET: Will be performed on all aircraft (including operational spare aircraft) identified for deployment in support of OCO. PRESET will commence noGoals for Maximum Number of Awaiting Maintenance earlier than 180 days prior to deployment and complete no later than 30Discrepancies days prior to deployment. (Event duration 14 days)• F/A – 18 A/C/D, AV-8B, UH/AH-1………………. 10 IN THEATER SUSTAINMENT: Will be performed on all aircraft that are• CH-46E ……………………………………………. 15 assigned OCONUS on extended rotation (more than 1 year) to ensure aircraft• MV-22, KC-130J …………………………………. 20 are maintained to “preset Condition” before their subsequent return to• KC-130F/R/T, CH-53-D/E…………………… 25 CONUS. (Event duration 30 days) RECONSTITUTION: Will be performed on all aircraft returning from OCO have at least 60 days of consecutive land-based operations in those operational areas. The Reconstitution will commence no earlier than the first day upon return from deployment, and will be completed no later than 180 days from the date the aircraft returned to CONUS. (Event duration 21 days) 14-8
    • SECTION 15 --- MARINE AVIATION GROUND SUPPORT PLANMarine Wing Support Groups / Marine Wing Support Squadrons – Force Structure 15-2ChangesMarine Aviation Ground Support Plan: Capability Enhancements 15-5Future of Aviation Ground Support 15-7 15-1
    • MARINE WING SUPPORT GROUP / MARINE WING SUPPORT SQUADRON – FORCE STRUCTURE CHANGES FORCE STRUCTURE CHANGES AGS TO THE ACE CONTINUES The Force Structure Review Group (FSRG) conducted a capabilities- Assessment based assessment to review the active, reserve and civilian • Efficiencies are created in the ability to prioritize, plan, and allocate manpower requirements of the Marine Corps. From this effort the MAW AGS/CSS resources. FSRG recommended force structure changes in order to meet CMC • MAG COs, Aviation Ground Support Departments, MWSS COs and directives to lighten the MAGTF and align to middleweight force HQMC APX will provide synchronized advocacy for AGS/CSS. initiatives. • Management of resources and training will continue in order to build/sustain MWSS combat formations. We are in the process of working through those changes, and some • AGS specific FAP requirements aboard Marine Corps Air Stations will have been implemented, as reflected below and on the wing continue. organizational charts: • CONUS/WestPac EAF maintenance and AGS support at MCASs will continue. Deactivate 4 MWSG HQs Military Police (3 x Active Component, 1 x Reserve Component) The deactivation of the MAW MP company creates the need to  MWSG-17 M00132 – 14 MO 40 ME 3 NO 4 NE revalidate the MWSS security mission in support of the ACE. Military  MWSG-27 M00317 – 14 MO 40 ME 3 NO 4 NE police assigned to the ACE Site Commander assist in developing  MWSG-37 M00375 – 14 MO 40 ME 3 NO 4 NE airbase ground defense and airfield security plans. Additional MP  Total Pax: 42 MO 120 ME 9 NO 12 NE essential tasks include security services, crime prevention, law (162 total Active Component Marines) enforcement, and education/training to recognize, counter, and  TFSD authorized 14 personnel from the active component prevent criminal and terrorist activity. MWSG structure to be retained and realigned to MAW Staff. Retention of 42 total Marines – divests 120 Marines. The ACE’s ability to execute the following security responsibilities is  MWSG-47 M00133 – 6 MO 12 ME(AC)/0 MO 9 ME(AR)/12 MO critical: 201 ME (SMCR)/3 NO 3 NE (SELRES)  Flight line, entry control points, and physical security surveys • Deactivate 4 x MP Companies – MAW structure loss.  Transportation security • Realign 13 x MWSS’s under the Marine Aircraft Groups.  Temporary detainee holding facilities • Retain and realign 14 x MWSG Billet Identification Codes (BICs) to  Incident response and command MAW staff. Includes retention of an 8040 Colonel to head the  Intra-base traffic control Aviation Ground Support Department (AGSD). Core subject matter expertise for air base ground defense (ABGD). • Loss of EOD BICs from the MWSD-24 (K-Bay) Table of Organization. Integration of MPs in the ACE provide training and personnel for critical airfield security services while setting conditions to enhance the expeditionary fighting capability of the ‘middle weight force’ of tomorrow. 15-2
    • MARFORPAC/1st MAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART FOR AGS SUPPORT 1st MAW MP COMPANY CAMP FOSTER MWHS-1 CAMP FOSTER MAG-12 MAG-36 MAG-24 MWSG-17 IWAKUNI FUTENMA MCAF K-BAY CAMP FOSTER (RJOI) (ROTM) (PHNG)MWSS-171 (RJOI) MWSS-172 (ROTM) MWSD (PHNG) MARFORCOM/2d MAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART FOR AGS SUPPORT 2d MAW MWHS-2 MP COMPANY (NKT) CHERRY POINT RJOI – MCAS Iwakuni, Japan MAG-14 MAG-29 MAG-26 MAG-31 MWSG-27 ROTM -MCAS Futenma, OkiCHERRY POINT NEW RIVER NEW RIVER BEAUFORT CHERRY POINT PHNG – MCAF K-Bay, HI (NKT) (NCA) (NCA) (NBC) (NKT) NKT – MCAS Cherry Point, NC NCA – MCAS New River, NCMWSS-271 (NKT) MWSS-274 (NKT) MWSS-272 (NCA) MWSS-273 (NBC) NBC – MCAS Beaufort, SC NKX – MCAS Miramar, CA NFG – Camp Pendleton, CA MARFORPAC/3d MAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART FOR AGS SUPPORT NYL – MCAS, Yuma NXP – SELF, 29 Palms, CA 3d MAW MIRAMAR MWHS-3 MP COMPANY (NKX) MAG-11 MAG-39 MAG-16 MAG-13 MWSG-37 Deactivate MIRAMAR PENDLETON MIRAMAR YUMA MIRAMAR (NKX) (1) (NFG) (NKX) (NYL) (NKX) Active UnitMWSS-373 (NKX) MWSS-372 (NFG) MWSS-374 MWSS-371 (NYL) 29 PALMS,CA (NXP) 15-3
    • MARFORRES/4th MAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART AGS SUPPORT MARFORRES 4th MAW NEW ORLEANS MAG-41 MAG-49 JRB FT WORTH JB McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst (NFW) (WRI) MWSS-471 (-) MWSS-473 (-) MWSS-472(-) MINNEAPOLIS (NKX) (WRI) MWSS-471 DET A (JST) MWSS-473 DET A (FRESNO) MWSS-472 DET A (WPA) MWSS-471 DET B (MTC) MWSS-473 DET B (NFW) MWSS-472 DET B (CEF) NKX – MCAS Miramar, CA WPA – Wyoming, PA CEF – Westover ARB, MA MTC – Selfridge ANGB, MI WRI- McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst JST – Johnstown Co., PA NFW – JRB Ft Worth, TX 15-4
    • MARINE AVIATION GROUND SUPPORT PLANMARINE WING SUPPORT SQUADRONS (MWSS) Capability EnhancementsMission Operational, training, and equipment enhancements continue toProvide essential aviation ground support (AGS) to all components keep AGS relevant as Marine Corps future operational and logisticsof the aviation combat element. concepts evolve. Enhancements in these areas include:Aviation Ground Support • Resetting and reconstituting OEF forces/equipment, positioningConsists of ground support functions required (less aircraft supply, AGS capability to better support future contingencies andmaintenance, and ordnance) for sustained air operations at air bases operational/training requirements.and forward operating bases. AGS is a critical expeditionary enablerfor Marine aviation. AGS is comprised of 13 functions: • Participating as the AGS element in Enhanced Mojave Viper (EMV), Mojave Viper (MV), and Lava Viper exercises for improved pre- • Internal airfield communications deployment preparation and integrated MAGTF training. • Expeditionary airfield services (EAF) • Airfield Rescue and FireFighting (ARFF) • Expansion of AGS capability, to include the establishment of a • Aircraft and ground refueling Marine Wing Support Detachment (MWSD) in support MAG-24 and • Explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) Marine aviation units operating in Hawaii and Guam. Expanded operations and training will eventually require the expansion of the • Essential engineer services MWSS detachment to a full squadron. MWSD-24 activation • Motor transport (MT) milestones establish IOC as 3rd Qtr FY12 and FOC as 2nd Qtr FY 13. • Field messing facilities • Routine and emergency sick call and medical functions • Maritime Prepositioning Force (MPF) capability sets to enable the • Individual and unit training ACE commander to employ measured AGS capabilities to support • Chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) aviation operations ashore or sea based. defense • Security services • Next generation airfield matting surface technology will meet • Air Base Commandant functions operational requirements of new T/M/S platforms and reduce logistical burden of legacy Airfield Matting (AM-2). • Advanced airfield lighting is smaller, self-contained and less maintenance intensive than current lighting systems. Solar powered lighting solutions will be researched and developed to reduce overall energy consumption and fuel source reliance. 15-5
    • MARINE AVIATION GROUND SUPPORT PLANCapability Enhancements - continued• Prevent brown-out conditions and decrease FOD hazards in • Advocate and support DOTMLPF solutions to lighten the load onaustere landing zones or air sites through proactive dust warfighters; reduce overall footprint; lessen energy consumptionabatement measures. Assist expeditionary airfield (EAF) and and dependence on fossil fuels; and achieve greater energyengineer Marines with soil stabilization, sub base and base layer efficiency in combat zones and expeditionary environments. Thisconstruction, and surface seal for construction of airfields and includes:helicopter landing zones. Increase current equipment allowances  Efficient electrical generation at FOBs and FARPs;and influence technology required for current operations in OEF,  Lighter, more efficient rechargeable batteries andfuture operations, and contingencies around the world. battery chargers;  Individual power generation;• Fund and field a new aircraft and structure fire fighting truck (P-  Improved tentage/billeting (energy efficient structures);19 replacement) providing state-of-the-art rescue and aircraft fire  Flexible expeditionary electrical distribution grids andfighting capabilities to permanent and expeditionary airfields power/load management systems;throughout the Marine Corps.  Use of water purification units to include light weight, low power, scalable water purification and effective• Field the Expeditionary Field Kitchen and Enhanced Tray Ration distribution;Heating System, increasing the capability to prepare a wider  Use of solar, wind, and fuel alternatives; andvariety of rations and provide the means to prepare, deliver, andserve hot meals in forward deployed areas.  Effective waste management practices. •Remain engaged in ground mobility initiatives that improve our• Receive and employ RQ-11B Raven Unmanned Aircraft Systems motor transportation speed, agility, and mobility in a complex,(UAS) and incorporate this capability into unit TTPs, SOPs, and ambiguous battlefield, against irregular forces and in a wide varietyAGS doctrine. Leverage UAS to improve accuracy and timeliness of operational environments. This includes platforms like the Jointof Base Recovery After Attack (BRATT) , airfield damage repair, Light Tactical Vehicle, Internally Transportable Vehicle, Mediumand initial airfield assessments. Tactical Vehicle Replacement, Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicle, and Logistics Vehicle System.• Support the family of Material Handling Equipment (MHE)program maintaining material handling and transportation • Provide fuel for highly mobile and flexible helicopter and fixed-support capabilities within the MWSS. Develop and field a ground wing operations in a dispersed posture. Includes bulk liquidcargo handling "system" that increases the velocity of the transportation, storage, and distribution capabilities and a forceintermodal transfer of parts and supplies, instead of relying on structure to support ACE operations. A self mobile fuel storagelegacy equipment and valuable Marine manpower to do the job dispensing capability under static, hot or cold refueling methods,(i.e. , EBFL Sky Trac). Ideally, a CH-53K will have an internally- and pantograph systems for hot pit refueling/defueling of fixed wing,transportable, tactically designed, all-terrain lifting/moving rotary wing and tilt rotor aircraft.capability. 15-6
    • MARINE AVIATION GROUND SUPPORT PLANThe Future of Aviation Ground Support Force ProtectionAs the MAGTF projects power ashore during expeditionary By employing lighter, more capable, and mobile equipment, the MWSSoperations, those units ashore will be operational for short periods of will provide uninterrupted AGS. Through focused training of Air Basetime requiring responsive logistical and aviation ground support Ground Defense (ABGD) platoons and military police integration, MWSS(AGS). Reducing the time it takes to set up and provide AGS and units will provide the ACE commander with seamless airfield serviceslogistics support ashore and the capability to move on short notice and airbase support. Equipment capability enhancements will lightenwill be key characteristics of future MWSSs. the overall footprint ashore and increase the ability to rapidly displace and relocate to support disparate operations. Central to MWSS overallACE Maneuver force protection is the ability to leverage MEF MPs and increaseThe ACE must have a robust AGS capability to deploy rapidly and mobility to reduce overall vulnerability.support the aviation requirements of the MAGTF and JTF commander.AGS capability must be measured; that is, precise amounts of fuel, Logistics Integrationammunition, logistics, and ACE-specific services must be at a time and The integration of all logistical assets ashore will be a critical enabler.place of the ACE commander’s choosing. The MWSS will maintain its Interoperability between the logistics combat element (LCE) and MWSScore capability to operate one FOB and two FARPs simultaneously. must be seamless. The MAGTF Logistics Integration (MLI) initiativeEmbedded within the MWSS will be task-organized and -equipped between aviation and I&L will ensure AGS is inclusive in logisticscapability sets (internal to the squadrons and loaded aboard MPF modernization (LOGMOD). This integration will encompass ground andships) that can be employed quickly for ACE mission tasking. aviation logistics processes, C2, and mission planning.ACE Command and Control Interoperable AGSKey to the effective sustainment of the ACE and MAGTF fight will be Current and future theater operations necessitate the integration of allgreater integration into the ACE C2 information architecture. The service engineers and aviation support capabilities for full-spectrumMWSS Aviation Ground Support Operations Center (AGSOC) will joint engineer and ground support functions. From combat and generalconnect to the ACE command information network and provide engineering to aviation support-specific functions, service organizationsincreased situational awareness to higher and adjacent commands to are sharing the battlefield and expanding joint capabilities to address arapidly support expeditionary operations. broad range of operational requirements. Enhanced capability serviceAdditionally, the airfield operations section (fuels, AARF, EAF, EOD) integration yields a successful combination of USAF large scale airfieldprovides unique expeditionary flexibility for aviation assets and the pavement capability and USMC austere expeditionary airfieldsupported units in austere environments. installation and maintenance capability in OEF. 15-7
    • Expeditionary Airfields MARINE AVIATION GROUND SUPPORT PLANBackgroundThe Expeditionary Airfield Family of Systems (EAF FoS) is a package capability thatfacilitates the rapid construction of expeditionary airfields near battle areas to provideair support for MAGTF operations. In any land-and-sea military / contingency operation,the rapid assembly of a temporary airfield provides ground units with the distinctadvantage of continuous air support on foreign soil. The Marine Corps has employedseveral types of expeditionary airfields since World War II. Initial research used woodenplanking for the runway surface. Later, during the Korean conflict, aviation engineersinstalled pierced steel planking (PSP), known as “Marston matting” at expeditionaryairfields. Today, airfield surfacing packages include AM-2 matting and accessories,arresting equipment, lighting and terminal guidance. As T/M/S aircraft evolve andmodernize, development of next generation expeditionary airfield equipment willremain a critical requirement.EAF 2000 concept (Current EAF)The present concept was developed to provide the Marine Corps a baseline EAFdesign and the resource requisite for planning and execution purposes. EAF 2000encompasses the assets to construct a 3,850 ft runway, parallel taxiway, hot refuelingpits, 78 parking spaces (including 3 x transport aircraft (KC-130)), and supports Jointoperations up to a C-17 aircraft. It also includes two sets of arresting gear and VisualLanding Aid and Lighting Systems. The Marine Corps (NAVAIR) maintains six total EAF2000 packages (3 on MPF).EAF 2025 concept (Future)Combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan have highlighted aviation’s expeditionarycapability through the employment and establishment of EAFs. The EAF 2000 concepthas served the Marine Corps well. However, with the introduction of the MV-22,concern over foreign object debris and dust abatement, optimal operational layout ofthe EAF, and future fielding of the JSF the EAF 2000 concept has become outmoded. Inorder to remain America’s expeditionary force in readiness and enable disparateaviation operations, the EAF FoS must evolve. This effort includes a three prongedfocus: •Supporting current contingencies with AM-2 and accessory inventories while reconstituting and resetting our stocks; •Testing and fielding new surfacing systems and the next generation of AM-2 mating and airfield lighting; •Positioning EAF assets across the FMF to best support force structure initiatives for the “middle weight “ force. 15-8
    • SECTION 16 --- MARINE CORPS AIR STATION FACILITIES UPGRADE / MILCON PLANMilitary construction (MILCON) projects are key and essential in We must also remain vigilant and we must guard againstrealization of the Commandant’s vision for Marine Corps encroachment to our air stations and associated air space.aviation. Required MilCon projects allow basing and effectivelyachieving IOC dates for introducing new weapon systems such The MilCon and Japanese Facilities Improvement Program (JFIP)as the MV-22 and JSF to the operational fleet and training projects listed in the following tables represent projectscommands. required for AvPlan realization, air safety or required to address some deficiencies. The project tables represent a snapshot inMILCON designs will focus on flexibility of use to allow new time, are subject to change and include pure AvPlan and regularweapon systems, squadron relocations, and re-designations to Air Station projects. Projects shown are not prioritized orserve MAGTF requirements as they evolve over time. Our new identified with associated costs to a specific program year.weapon systems have much greater range and capabilities thanlegacy platforms, and as a result use of our ranges and air spacemay differ.Our air stations and air facilities must remain viable. Wherepossible, we will use our existing physical assets as a bridge tothe full funding of our MILCON programs. The introduction ofJSF and ongoing transition to the MV-22 during the FY11-21timeframe will require additional MILCON resources to ensurewe mitigate programmatic and operational risk to both MarineCorps aviation and the Marine Corps as a whole. We can acceptsome risk in order to drive forward with our modernization ofthe force, but the resources must eventually be found torecapitalize our air stations. As part of the transition planningprocess, we know that we must work around obstacles by usingtemporary facilities, expeditionary assets, and increasedmanpower to accomplish the mission. 16-1
    • MCI EAST QUANTICO AIR FACILITY MCAS CHERRY POINT MCAS BEAUFORTP406 AIRCRAFT FLIGHT SIMULATOR (OFT) P164 MARINERS BAY LAND ACQ P444 PILOT TRAINING & SIMULATOR FACILITYP611 BEQ P136 BEQ P454 AIRCRAFT HANGAR - VMFATP612 MESS HALL P148 MISSILE MAGAZINE P420 INDOOR FITNESS FACILITYP1406 ATC TX/RX RELOCATE P176 STATION INFRASTRUCTURE UPGRADES P433 AICUZ LAND ACQUISITIONP647 ATFP GATE UPGRADE P601 ARMORY P442 VERITCAL LANDING PADS F35BP660 FUEL FARM AND HYDRANTS P163 MASS-1 COMPOUND P465 AIRCRAFT HANGAR - VMFAT MCAS NEW RIVER P658 FITNESS CENTER P472 AIRFIELD SECURITY UPGRADESP683 MV-22 MAINTENANCE HANGAR P134 MOBILIZATION AND ATFP IMPROVE P456 SIMULATED LHD DECKP687 MV-22 MAINTENANCE HANGAR P173 MWCS DETACHMENT FACILITY P459 RECYCLING/HAZWASTE FACILITYP705 AIRCRAFT MAINT HANGAR/APRON P147 ELECTROICS VAN PAD P464 AIRCRAFT HANGAR - VMFAT 2P710 CALA ADDITION P149 MISSILE MAINTENANCE FACILITY P427 GROUND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT SHOPP726 REGIONAL COMM STATION P199 JSF HANGAR P453 TOWNSEND TARGET LAND ACQUISTIONP690 STATION ARMORY P129 MACS2 OPERATIONS AND MAINT FAC P457 CRYOGENICS FACILITYP711 IPAC FACILITY P130 MOTOR TRANSPORT AND COMM SHOP P458 LAUREL BAY FIRE STATIONP676 CH-53K MAINTENANCE TRAINING P222 JSF SECURITY P475 AIRCRAFT HANGAR - VMFAP717 RECREATION CENTER P210 MCALF BOGUE AIRFIELD IMPROVE P471 MAG-31 HEADQUARTERSP729 OPERATIONAL TRAINER P197 JSF HANGAR P462 F-35B AIRCRAFT ASSUALT STRIPP709 ORDNANCE MAGAZINE P204 TRAINING AND SIMULATOR FACILITY P445 EXPEDITIONARY AIRFIELDP728 C-12 MAINTENANCE HANGAR P207 GROUND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT SHOP P446 F35-B AIRFIELD PAVEMENT MODP559 RUNWAY EXTENSION P205 VERTICAL LANDING PAD IMPROVE P440 AIR EMBARKATION FACILITYP669 FUEL HYDRANT UPGRADE P206 ARM/DEARM PADS P461 MARINE & FAMILY READINESS CENTERP674 CORROSION CONTROL HANGAR P203 AVIATION ARMAMENT SHOP P477 JET FUEL STORAGE CAPACITY EXPANDP730 V-22 IMC/P HANGAR P200 JSF HANGAR AND MAG HQ TELEPHONE BUILDINGP724 LIBRARY & EDUCATION CENTER P202 SUPPORT EQUIPMENT STORAGE P481 MRAP STORAGE & MAINT FACILITYP713 THEATER P209 ENGINE MAINTENANCE FACILITY P482 MACS-2 VEHICLE STOR & MAINT FACP718 CHRIMP WAREHOUSE P201 JSF HANGAR & STC TOWER/AIRFIELD OPS P483 CONSTRUCT RUNWAY OVERRUNSP706 SQUADRON WAREHOUSE P484 JSF MAINTENANCE TRAINING FACILITYP635 OSPREY SUPPORT CENTER P480 UPGRADE COMM INFRASTRUCTUREP721 MALS ADDITION MWSS 273 COMPLEXP712 DOUGLASS GATE SECURITY UPGRADE FACILITIES MAINTENANCE COMPLEXP389 GROUPD HEADQUATERS MAG-29 ORDINANCE CONTROL BUNKERSP489 STATION HQ BUILDINGP514 PROPERTY CONTROL FACILITY 16-2
    • MCI WEST MCAS YUMA MCAS YUMA (CONT.) MCAS MIRAMAR (CONT.) YU460 AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE HANGAR YU527 WATER SURVIVAL TRAINING FACILITY P224 TRANSMITTER BUILDING YU533 SIMULATOR FACILITY JSF YU577 ALF FACILITY JSF PHS III P233 RUNWAY 24L PHASE 2 YU573 IMA FACILITY JSF YU531 TACTICAL AIR COMMAND CENTER P198 JSF MAINT HANGAR PH 1 (OF 3) (JSF) YU546 UTILITIES UPGRADE JSF YU572 COMPOSITE REPAIR FACILITY JSF P199 COMPOSITE REPAIR/MAINT FAC (JSF) YU578 MALS-13 VAN PAD RELOCATION JSF YU585 RUNWAY UPGRADES F-35B P206 HANGAR 0 APRON EXPANSIONYU447A YU447 HANGAR UPGRADE JSF YU493 RUNWAY 3R/21L EXTENSION P207 AIRCRAFT RINSE FACILITY (JSF) YU583 COMM INFRASTRUCTURE UPGRADE JSF YU532 SECURITY ACCESS CONTROL FACILITY P216 RUNWAY 24R PHASE 1 YU545 DBLE AIRCRAFT MAINT HANGAR JSF YU112 POST OFFICE P218 HELIPAD AND PARKING APRON (JSF) YU535 AIRCRAFT MAINT HANGAR JSF YU419 LIFELONG LEARNING/LIBRARY CENTER P221 WASH RACK PHASE 1 (OF 3) (JSF) YU575 ALF FACILITY JSF PHS I YU450 RELIGIOUS ED CENTER ADDITION P222 VERTICAL LANDING PADS (JSF) YU566 CALA HELO YU580 FLIGHT LINE PARKING STRUCTURE JSF P237 AIRFIELD PARKING GARAGE YU378 SECURITY OPERATIONS FACILITY YU570 AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE HANGAR P201 JSF MAINT HANGAR PH 2 (OF 3) (JSF) YU596 HANGAR 95 RENOVATION YU505 LHA DECK REPAIR P228 WASH RACK PHASE 2 (OF 3) (JSF) YU539 ENLISTED DINING FACILITY JSF YU515 HARRIER ROAD OPERATIONS P234 RUNWAY 24R PHASE 2 YU504 CONSOLIDATED STATION ARMORY YU614 AIRFIELD POWER & LIGHTING P202 JSF MAINT HANGAR PH 3 (OF 3) (JSF) YU501 FIRE STATION YU616 LOX/N2 FACILITY P229 WASH RACK PHASE 3 (OF 3) (JSF) YU502 MALS 13 PROPERTY CONTROL FACILITY YU619 F-35 MAINTENANCE TRAINER FACILITY P235 LHD PAD SHOULDERS YU364 PHYSICAL FITNESS CENTER YU617 MALS-13 BUILDING UPGRADES MCAS PENDELTON YU591 WATER TREATMENT PLANT YU552 MACS-1 DET OPS BUILDING PA109 CNATT/FRS - AVN TRAINING AND BEQ YU612 VMX-22/CH53K OT & E MAINT HANGAR MCAS MIRAMAR PA111 MALS-39 MAINT HANGAR EXPANSION YU538 BACHELOR ENLISTED QUARTERS JSF P152 APRON/TAXIWAY EXPAND (MV-22) PA114 MV-22 DOUBLE HANGAR REPLACEMENT YU446 CONSOLIDATED EOD FACILITY P185 HANGAR 4 (MV-22) PA116 MV-22 AVIATION PAVEMENT YU579 AVIATION MAINT EQUIP WAREHOUSE P192 MAINTENANCE HANGAR 7 (MV-22) PA117 MV-22 AVIATION FUEL STORAGE YU587 TAXIWAY & APRON UPGRADES F-35B P181 HANGAR 5 MODIFICATION (MV-22) PA113 MV-22 AVIATION SIMULATOR BUILDING YU568 CLC-16 RELOCATION P189 OPERATIONS AND TRAINING FACILITY PA042 AVIATION DEPARTURE IMPROVEMENTS YU576 ALF FACILITY JSF PHS II P209 RUNWAY 24L PHASE 1 PA101 MAIN GATE SECURITY IMPROVEMENTS YU602 CALA MAINTENANCE FACILITIES P225 AIRFIELD TAXIWAY PA106 TROOP TRAINING ACCESS STRUCTURE YU551 AIRCRAFT MAINT HANGAR JSF P205 PLESS AVE ROAD EXTENSION PA119 EXPAND HANGAR 23144 FOR HMLA YU598 CONSOLIDATED CHILLER FACILITY P204 VEHICULAR BRIDGE (JSF) PA120 EXPAND HANGAR 23170 FOR HMLA YU558 MAIN GATE CANNON COMPLEX P210 SIMULATOR FACILITY (JSF) PA123 INTERSECTION SAFETY IMPROVE YU542 MWSS-371 RELOCATION P190 TACTICAL AIR CONTROL FACILITY PA118 AVN WAREHOUSE GROUND SUPPORT YU536 MAG/MALS/MCAS HQ FACILITY JSF P191 TACTICAL AIR CONTROL FACILITY PA121 PERIMETER PARKING YU503 TRANSIENT BEQ P194 ARMORY BASE PENDELTON YU421 STUDENT BARRACKS QUARTERS P193 BEQ PE1180 32 AREA RESERVOIR YU589 F-35 VTOL PADS P223 RECEIVER BUILDING PE1015 MASS-3 OPERATIONS COMPLEX YU600 F-35 MBIT PADS P225 AIRFIELD TAXIWAY 16-3
    • HAWAII & JAPAN MCAS KBAY OKINAWA MCAS FUTENMA MCAS IWAKUNI (CONT.)P822 MCAS OPERATIONS COMPLEX PXX1 UPGRADE MAIN GATE MC165-T CVW-5 HANGAR & PH I APRONP904 MV-22 HANGAR & INFRASTRUCTURE PXX2 DEMO AND REPLACE BARRACKS 219 MC166-T CVW-5 AIRCRAFT HANGAR & PH II APRONP889 INTERIM CONSOLIDATED AID STATION P211 UPGRADE BUILDING 520 MC167-T CVW-5 MAINT HANGAR & PH III APRONP905 AIRCRAFT STAGING AREA (MV-22) P201 AIRFIELD SECURITY FENCE MC168-T CORR CONTROL HANGAR & WASH PADP913 MAG-24 ARMORY EXTENSION P204 RUNWAY TAXIWAY SHOULDERS IMP. MC175-T CONSOLIDATED MAINTENANCE HANGARP914 MV-22 WASHRACK P203 MATS & ANCILLARY EQUIP STORAGE MC158-T OPERATIONAL TRAINERS COMPLEXP916 MV-22/HMLA WAREHOUSE PXX3 DEMO & REPLACE BLDG 652 MC156-T MAG-12 GEN STORAGE WHSE & SHEDSP863 HMLA HANGAR RENOVATION P207 AIRCRAFT PARKING APRON MC948-T AIRFIELD FIRE TRAINING FACILITIES PH 2P910 BACHELOR ENLISTED QUARTERS PH I P206 APRON JOINT UPGRADES MC255-T FLIGHT LINE INFRASTRUCTREP884 MISSION SUPPORT FACILITY (ATS) PXX4 TYPE II MAINT HANGAR MC320-T FLIGHT LINE PERIMETER FENCINGP887 MV-22 LANDING ZONE IMPROVEMENTS P205 RUNWAY OVERRUN MC194-T JP5 FUEL STORAGEP836 MAG-24 HQ AND PARKING BUILDING OKINAWA CAMP FOSTER MC305-T LOX STORAGEP864 MALS AIRCRAFT MAINT EXPANSION P302 CONSTRUCT HELIPAD (BUILDING 1) MC156-T MAG-12/CVW-5 GENL STOR WHSE & SHEDSP885 MWSS HQ AND SUPPORT FACILITIES MCAS IWAKUNI MC908-T HAZARDOUS CARGO LOADING AREAP049 NAVY -- P-8 HANGAR & TRAINING FAC MC0201-T MAG-12 DUAL SQUAD HANGAR PH 1 P995 MC-0421 HANGAR IMPROVEMENT NORTHP907 MV-22 PRKG APRON/INFRA (2ND SQD) MC0421-T MAG-12 DUAL SQUADRON HANGAR PH2 P996 VTOL PAD NORTHP911 BACHELOR ENLISTED QUARTERS PH II MC150-T MALS-12 AV MAINT FAC & VAN COMPLEX MC159-T MAG-12 / CVW-5 HQ BUILDINGP067 NAVY -- P-8 HANGAR & TRAINING FAC MC0404 MALS-12 CONTROLLED HUMIDITY WHSE MC0135 STATION AIRCRAFT MAINT HANGARP908 MV-22 HANGAR (2ND VMM SQND) MC155-T MALS-12 HUSH HOUSE & ENGINE TEST MC263-T CVW-5 MAINTENANCE TEST AREAP912 BACHELOR ENLISTED QUARTERS PH III MC909-T TACTICAL AIRCRAFT DIRECT FUEL STA P1003 OP TRAINING COMPLEX IMPROVEMENTSP891 CH-53K INFRASTRUCTURE UPGRADES MC250-T CVW-5 AIMD AVIATION MAINT FACILITY P1004 AIRFIELD SECURITY UPGRADESP883 ACCESS ROAD/UNDERPASS RUNWAY MC164-T STATION/VISITING AC APRON & SUPPORT P945 TYPE III HYDRANT FUELING SYS (DESC)P882 DEMO HANGAR 105 & TAXIWAY IMPRV MC169-T CVW-5 HUSH HOUSE & ENGINE TEST CELL P1000 MC-0421 HANGAR IMPROVEMENT SOUTHP883 RUNWAY UNDERPASS MC157-T FLIGHTLINE FIRE STATION P1005 VTOL PAD SOUTH OKINAWA IE SHIMA MC0447 EAST UTILITY PLANT P950 BULK FUEL STRG TANKS- PACOM (DESC)P801 IE SHIMA UPGRADES JSF MC152-T MAG-12 WASH PAD MC936-T STATION AIR CARGO TERMINAL OKINAWA MARINE WING LIAISON KADENA MC170-T VMGR-152 AIRCRAFT MAINT HANGAR P951 PROVIDE T-5 CAPABLE PIER (DESC)P803 MOD MWLK ACFT MAINT HANGAR JSF MC171-T VMGR-152 SUPPLY / STORAGE COMPLEX P1002 MC-0201 HANGAR IMPROVEMENT SOUTHP804 SUNSHADES & PARKING JSF MC172-T VMGR-152 CORROSION CONTROL HANGAR P940 ALT TRUCK FUEL RECEIPT SYSTEM (DESC)P807 MAINT BLDG & PARKING JSF MC173-T VMGR-152 APRON, WASHRACK & RINSE P1001 MC-0201 HANGAR IMPROVEMENT NORTH 16-4
    • SECTION 17 --- PLATFORM QUICK REFERENCE “QUAD” CHARTSFixed-Wing Aircraft 17-2Rotary-Wing and Tiltrotor Aircraft 17-9Presidential Support Aircraft 17-18Operational Support Aircraft 17-19Unmanned Aircraft Systems 17-25Expeditionary Enablers 17-29 17-1
    • Program Description Program Update – October 2011The Joint Strike Fighter brings strategic agility, operational flexibility and • F-35B has accomplished more than 200 vertical landingstactical supremacy to the MAGTF and represents the centerpiece of Marine • F-35B has flown more than 500 sorties and over 650 flight hoursaviation transformation. The F-35B unites 5th generation stealth, precisionweapons and multi-spectral sensors with the expeditionary responsiveness of a • F-35C has flown more than 145 sorties and more than 200 flight hoursShort Take-off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) fighter-attack platform. The F-35C • VMFAT-501 scheduled to receive its first F-35 in November 2011provides additional flexibility and persistence operating from aircraft carriers. • USMC F-35B basing Record of Decision, December 2010 • MCAS Ready for Operations (RFO) dates for all F-35B squadrons are definedThe F-35 in 2015: in accordance with DCA Memo for the Record dtd. 15 May 2010.• 50 aircraft delivered into Marine Corps service (43 F-35B & 7 F-35C) • Yuma RFO: 1 May 2012• 3 USMC squadrons in place • Beaufort RFO: 1 Jan 2014• 1st UDP deployment complete • Iwakuni RFO: 1 Mar 2014• 1st MEU detachment underwayThe F-35B in 2017: 5 projected deployments (3 MEU, 2 UDP)F-35 B/C Lightning II • Combat radius: F-35B = 450 nm; F-35C = 600 nmTransition Task Force (TTF) and Cross Functional Teams (CFT) • Internal fuel: F-35B = 14,000 lbs; F-35C = 20,000 lbsTTF #9: October 2011 in Arlington, VA ; TTF #10, spring 2012 • Ordnance load-out: 18,000 lbs. across 11 weapons stations• CFT 1: Test and Training • Internal carriage: F-35B 2 x 1,000 lb. class + 2 x AIM-120• CFT 2: Organization and Manpower AMRAAM F-35C 2 x 2,000 lb. class + 2 x AIM-120 AMRAAM• CFT 3: Maintenance/Logistics • Max gross weight: F-35B = 61,500 lbs; F-35C = 70,400• CFT 3B: Installations/Facilities/Environmental • Cruise speed w/ attack payload: .94M / Top speed: 1.6M• CFT-4: Requirements • Offensive systems: APG-81 radar, Electro Optical Targeting System (EOTS)• CFT 5: Autonomic Logistics Information System (ALIS) integration • Defensive systems: advanced Electronic Warfare / Electronic ProtectionSite Activation Task Force (SATAF) standing organizations (EP/EW), electro-optical Distributed Aperture System (DAS)• MCAS Yuma, AZ: SATAF Conference #4, Dec 2011 • Network systems: LINK-16, VMF, Multi-function Advanced Data Link (MADL)• MCAS Iwakuni, Japan: SATAF Conference #4, Feb 2012 • Very low observable, 360° integrated fused sensor information• MCAS Beaufort, SC: SATAF Conference #5, Mar 2012 Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-2
    • Program Descriptions Program Updates MAGTF EW Mission: Support the MAGTF Commander by conducting airborne EA-6B - Transition to ICAP III began 7 April 2010 electronic warfare, day or night, under all weather conditions during • PMAI remains 20 expeditionary, joint, or combined operations. Increase combat survivability of • Transition to be complete by 2012 ground forces, assault support and strike aircraft & weapons by denying, • Total ICAP III aircraft inventory 32 degrading, disrupting the enemy’s ability to target and engage our forces. CORPORAL JCTD EA-6B • Technical Demonstration 3– Spring 2011 • 4 Squadrons of 5 aircraft • Final Report August 2011 • Transition to ICAP III to be complete Jun 2012 • Begin MAGTF EW Transition with Extended Use (EU) Phase • Program of Record into 2019 SRP Intrepid Tiger II (ALQ-231) • First SRP has been completed • MEU focus (AV-8B, F/A18, AH/UH-series helos) • Delivered to NRL • 80 pods for counter-comms and IW RF target sets • Component cards installed; CORPORAL JCTD completed May 2011 • payload in system-level checks • Transitioning capabilities to MAGTF EW • Outside organizations using • Distributed ISR and EW on organic UAS • SDK to develop apps • 48 Shadow 200 (eventually on Group 4 UAS) SRP – Multi-function, reprogrammable RF deviceEA-6B Prowler and AEA Systems • Combat Radius – 30 min. out; 1 hr. 45 min.MAGTF EW TOS; 30 min RTB; • Approving ICD and writing CDD • 20 min. reserveEA-6B • Weapons Stations - 5 • Complete ICAP III transition as soon as practical • Periodically revisit requirement for a FRS at MCAS Cherry Point • Empty Weight – 34,000 poundsIntrepid Tiger II • Max Gross Weight & Use Payload – 61,500 pounds • Complete QRA Fall 2011 • Top Speed – Subsonic • Operational assessment with AV-8B in Cherry Point • Deploy with AV-8B to OEF in FY-12 • Cruise Speed w/ Attack Payload – 0.86 IMN with Stores • Add Electronic Warfare Support (ES) capability in 2012 • Offensive Systems – ALQ-99 Tactical Jamming System (TJS) with ICAP II; ALQ-218CORPORAL JCTD Receiver and ALQ-99 pods with ICAP III; USQ-113 Communications Jammer; AGM- • Begin MAGTF EW Transition in 2011 88 HARM; LITENING Pod; ALE-43 Bulk Chaff Pod; • Integrate SRP beginning in 2012 • Defensive Systems – ALE-47SRP • Develop EA functionality in 2011-2012 • Network Systems - Multi-functional Info Distribution System (MIDS) with Link 16; • Begin production and fielding of EA devices in 2011-2012 Multi-mission Advanced Tactical Terminal / Integrated Broadcast System (MATT/IBS) Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-3
    • Program Description Program Update •FA-18A+/C/D Inventory Issues VMFA Mission: Support the MAGTF Commander by destroying surface targets • SLAP Phase II, SLEP Phase A and B complete and enemy aircraft, and escorting friendly aircraft, day or night under all • Phase C (Kit installs) begin in 2012 weather conditions during expeditionary, joint, or combined operations. •ECP-583 (A++, C+) • A+: 61 aircraft identified, 56 current total (5 attrition) F/A-18 • C+: 30 aircraft identified (19 in AMARG storage) • Active: 12 Squadrons / 177 Aircraft • ECD: FY12/16 • FRS: 1 Squadron / 45 Aircraft •APG-73 RUG II Expand 4/5 (FA-18D) • Reserve: 1 Squadron / 13 Aircraft • All-weather enhanced target resolution capability • Total: 235 Aircraft •ATARS (FA-18D) • SHARC funding through intel community / MARCORSYSCOM Enduring Missions Both Coasts •LITENING • TAI: 3 squadrons • Gen 4 with LTIP • UDP: 8 squadrons •Electronic Warfare • PCS: 1 squadron •ALQ-126 replacement •ALQ-165 (Land based) Contingency Operations •ALQ-214 (TAI units) • TBD •Weapons •APKWS - 2012F/A-18A-D Hornet •Combat radius: 500+ nm (900+ km)FA-18 Inventory managed to support JSF transition • Seating capacity/crew options: • Cadre Active/Reserve Squadrons • Model F/A-18A++/C: one-seat (pilot-only)Structural Life Management Program Goals (minimum) • Model F/A-18D: two-seats (pilot/WSO) • SLEP Phase B complete • Dimensions: length 56 ft (17.1 m), wing span 40 ft (12.3 m), height 15.3 ft (4.7 m) • 6,000 hrs  10,000 hrs • Propulsion: two F404-GE-402 engines, each with 18,000 pounds of thrust • Top speed: Mach 1.8 • 2000 Traps  2700 (1500 B/D) • Aircraft gross weight: 24,000-25,000 lbs • 8,300 landings  14,500 (20,000 B/D) • Armament: Air – Air • .78 FLE  1.0 FLE (via 421 CBR+) • AIM-9, AIM-120, AIM-7, 20mm GunMission System Goals to meet AVPLAN Requirements • Armament: Air – Ground • G4 LITENING - Flight Clearance granted • 20mm Gun, Rockets, GP bombs, Laser Guided, GPS weapons, Dual Mode • Sensors: • Digital CAS Interoperability – Gen 5 radio with 27X • APG-65/73 RADAR, Litening FLIR, Advanced Tactical Air Reconnaissance • JHMCS - Complete System (ATARS on F/A-18D only) • LINK 16 - Complete • Electronic Warfare: • AIM-9X Block II - 2012 • ALE-39 / 47, ALQ-126B / 165, ALR-67v(2) / v(3) Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-4
    • Program Description Program UpdateVMA Mission: Support the MAGTF Commander by destroying surface targets and • Planned out of service date extended to 2026escorting friendly aircraft, day or night under all weather conditions during • Advanced Tactical Data Link (ATDL)expeditionary, joint, or combined operations • CORPORAL JCTD to assess feasibility of TTNT waveformAV-8B: • Military Utility Assessment Spring 2011 •Active: 7 Squadrons/105 Aircraft • Gateway to ISR network •FRS: 1 Squadron/29 Aircraft • Vision is common TACAIR ATDL through LITENING •Test: 5 Aircraft • Helmet Mounted Cueing System •FS Custody: 5 Aircraft (Day attack configuration) • Validated Deliberate UNS •Total: 144 Aircraft • POM-14 Issue Sheet • Airborne VMF Terminal (AVT) – RDT&E funded, procurement TBDEnduring Missions Both Coasts • Digital Video Recorder – funded drop-in replacement •MEU: 12 Aircraft deployed/12 in work ups • IFF Mode 5/S – funded replacement for current APX-100 •UDP: 6 Aircraft deployed ISO 31st MEU • Stores • AIM-120 A/B – Fleet intro in fall of 2011Contingency Operations: • APKWS - JCTD underway with AV-8B as threshold platform •OEF: 10 Aircraft to enduring commitment • Intrepid Tiger II – 2011 Early Operational Capability in OEFAV-8B Harrier •Airframe/Engine Sustainment Combat Radius: ~300NM (500NM w/tnks) • Close Ready Basic Aircraft (RBA) gap • Readiness Management Program/IMC turnaround Weapons Stations: 7 • Sustain Engine Readiness Empty Weight: 14,912 lbs • Material availability/Sustained production • Attrition Recovery Max Gross Weight: 32,000 lbs •Tactical Relevance Propulsion: Rolls Royce F402-RR-408 turbo fan providing 23,400 pounds of thrust • H6.0 OFP Upgrade • Digital Improved Triple Ejector Racks (enables 10xGBU-38) Top Speed: 585 KCAS/1.0 IMN • ALE-47 Integration •Cruise Speed w/ Attack Payload: 0.75–0.85 IMN • APG-65 23X Integration • H6.1 Maintenance upgrade Armament: 500/1000lb GPS/Laser/General Purpose Bombs, CBU-99/100, CBU-78, • MSC/WMC Processor Upgrade MK-77, 2.75/5.0 inch rockets, AGM-65E, AIM-120B, AIM-9M, GAU-12 • LITENING Gen 4 and P & P II Integration Sensors: APG-65 RADAR, AN/AAQ-28 LITENING Pod, NavFLIR, Dual-mode tracker • AGM-65E self-lase capability • GBU-54 Laser JDAM In Weapon LAR full integration Electronic Warfare: ALE-39/47 ECM, ALR-67 RWR, ALQ-164 DECM Pod • H6.2 Maintenance upgrade • RNP/RNAV (GPS approach) Network Systems: Automatic Target Handoff System, LITENING C-band video • Mission Planning update downlink, Intrepid Tiger II Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-5
    • Program Description Program Update Mission: Support the MAGTF commander by providing air-to-air refueling and • USMC Program of Record: 79 KC-130J aircraft (PAI) assault support. The installation of the Bolt-on/Bolt-off Harvest HAWK ISR • 3 Active Squadrons of 15 KC-130Js (PMAI) Weapon Mission Kit enables the KC-130J to conduct intelligence, surveillance, • 2 Reserve Squadrons of 12 KC-130Js (PMAI) reconnaissance, target acquisition, indirect and direct fires adjustment, • 1 Test Asset (PDAI) battlefield damage assessment and destroy surface targets day or night • 9 Pipeline Assets (BAI) under all weather conditions during expeditionary, joint, or combined operations. • 44 KC-130J aircraft delivered as of the date of this publication. • 2 additional aircraft are on contract to deliver by the end of CY11. • 1 aircraft on contract for delivery in FY13. • 47 total aircraft delivered or on contract is 32 aircraft short of POR •1 aircraft is programmed for procurement in FY12 •8 aircraft programmed in the POM-13FYDP (FY13-17)KC-130J Hercules • Range (20,000-lb Payload) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,250 nm Enlisted Aircrew Consolidation: POA&M to combine the KC-130J Loadmaster • Empty Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91,000 lb and Crew Chief into a single MOS “Crewmaster”. • Fuel Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58,500 lb • Maximum Normal Takeoff Weight (2.0g). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164,000 lb 4th MAW KC-130J Transition: POA&M to transition Reserve Component • Maximum Cruise Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320 kts VMGR squadrons from the KC-130T to the KC-130J aircraft, beginning in • Cruise Ceiling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25,000 ft FY15. • Fuel Offload @ 1200nm / 20,000 ft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30,000 lb • Passenger Capacity (Ground Troops) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Harvest HAWK Fire Control Operator: POA&M to source, train and sustain the • Paratroop Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Harvest HAWK Fire Control Operator (FCO) crew position. • Air Ambulance Litter Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Defensive Electronic Countermeasures: • Radar Warning Receiver (RWR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .AN/ALR-56M • Advanced Missile Warning System and Laser Detecting Set .. AN/AAR-47(V)2 • Advanced Countermeasure Dispenser System (CMDS) . . . . . . . . . AN/ALE-47 • Advanced IR Countermeasure System . . . . . . . . . . . . . AN/ALQ-157 version 2 Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-6
    • Program Description Program Update Mission: Support the MAGTF commander by conducting intelligence, Status: The capability first deployed in support of OEF in October, 2010 and surveillance, reconnaissance, target acquisition, indirect and direct fires has experienced overwhelming success in theater. Feedback from supported adjustment, battlefield damage assessment and destroying surface targets units is outstanding. Three kits have been delivered to the Fleet to provide day or night under all weather conditions during expeditionary, joint, or continuous support for OEF. combined operations. Description: In response to an Urgent Universal Need, the USMC integrated a bolt-on/bolt-off ISR/weapon mission kit for use on existing KC-130J aircraft. This mission kit is designed to re-configure any KC-130J aircraft rapidly into a platform capable of performing persistent targeting ISR from a AN/AAQ-30 Targeting Sight System mounted on the aft portion of the left hand external fuel tank. Additionally, the mission kit enables the aircraft to deliver precision fires using HELLFIRE and Griffin munitions. This mission kit is designed as a complementary capability that takes advantage of the aircraft’s extended endurance.KC-130J Harvest HAWK • Combat Radius . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 nm • Endurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8+hrs • Maximum Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 kts Future TSS Upgrades: POA&M to integrate a Laser Spot Tracker, Production • Operational Ceiling . . . . . . . . .25,000 ft IR Pointer and IR Energy Filter into Production TSS units. Systems: • Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AN/AAQ-30 Target Sight System (TSS) FLIR/Camera, Future upgrades: 3rd Gen Mid Wave FLIR with Color Camera optimizes D/R/I ranges, Laser Range •Recover left hand air-to-air refueling pod by relocating HELLFIRE Finder and Designator •Recover external tank fuel by relocating sensor. •Add suppressive fires capability. •Fire Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lockheed Martin Littoral Combat Ship Fire Control Station (FCS), SOCOM Battle Management System (BMS) . Weapons: (2 Air to Ground Weapons Stations) • (4) Wing mounted AGM-114P HELLFIRE – 28lb warhead • (10) Ramp launched Griffin SOPGM – 13lb warhead •Interoperability: . . . . . . . . . .AN/ARC-210 Havequick / SINCGARS Radio, UHF frequency hopping system, SATCOM, Rover IV Down Link Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-7
    • Program Description Program Update Mission: Support the MAGTF commander by providing aerial refueling, KC-130J Transition: 4th MAW KC-130Ts will be retired as KC-130Js are assault support, day or night, under all weather conditions during delivered in (3) plane detachment increments. The first (2) KC-130Js are expeditionary, joint, or combined operations. planned to deliver during FY15. VMGR-452 (Newburgh, NY) will transition to the KC-130J first, followed by VMGR-234 (Ft Worth, TX). • Projected IOC (8 KC-130Js): • VMGR-452 – FY18 • VMGR-234 – FY22 • Projected FOC: (12 KC-130Js): • VMGR-452 – FY25 • VMGR-234 – FY26KC-130T Hercules • Enlisted Aircrew Consolidation: POA&M to combine the KC-130T • Range (20,000-lb Payload) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,000 nm Loadmaster and Flight Mechanic into a single MOS “Crewmaster”. • Empty Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87,000 lb • Fuel Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58,500 lb • KC-130T Parts Obsolescence: POA&M to identify parts with Diminishing • Maximum Normal Takeoff Weight (2.0g) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155,000 lb Manufacturing Sources and Material Shortages (DMS –MS) and to provide • Maximum Cruise Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 kts options for sustainment or sourcing through completion of the KC-130J • Cruise Ceiling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25,000 ft transition. • Fuel Offload @ 1200nm / 20,000 ft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30,000 lb • Passenger Capacity (Ground Troops) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 • 4th MAW KC-130J Transition: POA&M to transition Reserve Component • Paratroop Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 VMGR squadrons from the KC-130T to the KC-130J aircraft, beginning in • Air Ambulance Litter Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 FY15. Defensive Electronic Countermeasures: • Tactical Systems Operator Sundown: POA&M to manage sundown of • Radar Warning Receiver (RWR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AN/APR-39A(V)2 existing inventory of Warrant Officer and Enlisted Tactical Systems Operators. • Advanced Missile Warning System and Laser Detecting Set . . AN/AAR-47(V)2 • Advanced Countermeasure Dispenser System (CMDS) . . . . . . . . . AN/ALE-47 • Advanced IR Countermeasure System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AN/ALQ-157A(V)1 Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-8
    • Program Description Program Update Basics Aircraft Status IOC: FY07 •138 of 360 production aircraft have been delivered as of Jun 11 FOC: FY17 • 2 of 9 aircraft complete with Block A to Block B modification process Procurement Objective: 360 2d MAW Block Upgrades • Transition complete, 6 FOC VMMs • Block B: Improved reliability / maintainability, wing tanks, retractable • MEU / OEF rotations ongoing probe 3d MAW • Block C: Weather radar, upgraded Environmental Control System, Aircraft Survivability Equipment enhancements, Troop Commander Situational • VMM-161 FOC Apr 2011 Awareness device, and new standby flight instruments • 3 VMMs in transition 1st MAW • 1st VMM to Okinawa ~ Oct 2012 •Hawaii EIS ROD ~ Mar 2012MV-22B Osprey CFT 1 (Doctrine and Training) • West Coast / WESTPAC Transition Strategy • Combat Radius: 2+30 en route, 30 min TOS (~325nm) CFT 2 (Organization and Manpower) • Empty Weight : 35,000lbs • West Coast / West PAC / Reserve Transition Strategy • Max Gross Weight: 52,600lbs VTOL / 57,000lbs STO • Squadron PCS manpower flow • Payload: Internal / External - 24 passengers / 12 litters / 12,500lbs CFT 3 (Material and Facilities) • Top Speed: 280 KCAS • West Coast Environmental Impact Statement (Training) • Cruise Speed: 262 KCAS • WESTPAC Environmental Impact Statement • Defensive Systems: AAR-47 B(V)2, APR-39 A(V)2, ALE-47, M240D 7.62 / • WESTPAC and Reserve basing and facilities strategy GAU-16 Tail Gun, GAU-17 IDWS • West Coast facilities Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-9
    • Program Description Program Update Mission: Conduct expeditionary medium-lift assault support, to include combat • IOC: 1964 troop assault, transportation of personnel and supplies, Tactical Recovery of • Planned retirement: 2017 Aircraft and Personnel, and casualty evacuation in support of sea-based and • Inventory: 133 CH-46E, 3 HH-46E sustained operations ashore. Conduct search and rescue. • Targeted Sustainment upgrades to engines, avionics, and drivetrain in order to keep the aircraft safe, reliable, and relevantCH-46E Sea Knight • Combat Radius: 75 nm • The CH-46E is standing down concurrently with MV-22B standup • Mod efforts underway to upgrade ASE (LAIRCM) • Max Gross Weight: 24,300 lbs • Payload: up to 4,000 lbs • Cruise Speed: 120 kts • Defensive Systems: AAR-47, ALE-47, ALQ-157, APR-39, 2 x XM-218 .50 cal Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-10
    • Program Description Program Update The Huey is the most successful military helicopter ever produced, with • Sundown for the UH-1N began in 2010 with the first aircraft flown to more than 16,000 delivered since 1956. Deliveries of the UH-1N to the Davis- Monthan for retirement. Marine Corps began in 1971 and completed in 1979. Transition from the UH-1N to the UH-1Y is well underway and will complete in FY13 for the • Approximately two aircraft will be retired per month until completion, active component and in FY15 for the reserve component. and only survivability and forward fit initiatives will be pursued until the end of its service life. • Current inventory (Sep 11) is 46 UH-1Ns.UH-1N Huey BRITE Star Block II • Combat Radius*: 63 nm • 126 Systems on contract • Weapons Stations: Two • Five systems delivering each month • Systems forward fit to the UH-1Y • Empty Weight: 7,200 lbs • Outstanding IR and FLIR detection, recognition, and identification capabilities • Max Gross Weight: 10,500 lbs to include sensor fusion • Useful Payload (HOGE): 3,352 lbs Foreign Military Sales (FMS) • Cruise Speed: 100 kts • Several government agencies and foreign partners have expressed interest in obtaining retired USMC UH-1Ns. • Offensive Systems: 2.75-inch rockets, fixed forward or crew served 7.62mm/GAU-17A/ gun and or crew served M240D/GAU-16 machine guns. • Defensive Systems: AAR-47, ALE-47, ALQ-144, and APR-39 * (Mission radius with four fully loaded combat troops) Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-11
    • Program Description Program Update The H-1 Upgrades Program, comprised of the UH-1Y and AH-1Z, is a single • The UH-1Y achieved its Initial Operational Capability (IOC) on 08 Aug 08 and was Acquisition Program which leverages 84% commonality of major components, granted Full Rate Production (FRP) approval on 17 Sep 08. enhancing deployability and maintainability while reducing training requirements and logistical footprint. • Successfully completed first MEU Deployment (July 09), began sustained OEF deployment with a full squadron component of nine aircraft in Oct 2009, and The “Yankee Forward” procurement strategy was initiated to prioritize rejoins MEU Deployment cycle alongside AH-1Z in early FY12. replacement of the aging UH-1N (35 year average age) with UH-1Ys as quickly as possible. • MARFORPAC conversion to UH-1Y will complete in FY12, MARFORCOM completes in FY13, and MARFORRES completes in FY15. Procurement objective is 160 UH-1Ys, with FY16 planned as the last year of USMC UH-1Y procurement.UH-1Y Yankee 89 UH-1Ys (Lots 1-8) on contract • Combat Radius*: 129 nm • 47 aircraft delivered to date (as of Sep 11) • Weapons Stations: Two • MAG-39 UH-1Y conversion complete • Empty Weight: 11,700 lbs BRITE Star Block II • Max Gross Weight: 18,500 lbs • Forward fit from UH-1N • Use Payload (HOGE): 5,930 lbs Advanced Precision Kill Weapon System (APKWS) integration • Cruise Speed: 147 kts • Provides first precision targeting capability for UH-1 • Offensive Systems: 2.75-inch rockets, fixed forward or crew served 7.62mm/GAU-17A gun and or crew served M240D/GAU-16/GAU-21 machine guns • Defensive Systems: AAR-47, ALE-47, and APR-39 * (Mission radius with eight combat loaded troops, 5 minute mid-mission HOGE, 10 minutes on station, and 20 minute fuel reserve) Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-12
    • Program Description Program Update • AH-1Ws are currently being outfitted with the Night Targeting System UpgradeThe U.S. Marine Corps has been flying the AH-1W Super Cobra since 1986, with (NTSU), a 3rd Generation Targeting FLIR with Laser Designator / Rangefinder andthe last of the AH-1Ws delivered in 1998. Though the AH-1W will be replaced color TV camera, which has made significant contributions to the quality ofby the AH-1Z, the aircraft will remain in service until 2021. Currently 127 AH- offensive air support provided during Operation Enduring Freedom.1Ws are planned for “remanufacture” into AH-1Zs. • 90 AH-1Ws have been outfitted with the Tactical Video Data Link (TVDL) system, enabling aircrews to send and receive sensor Full Motion Video (FMV) in C, L, and S Bands in support of reconnaissance and close air support missions.AH-1W Super Cobra Work continues to increase the combat capability of the AH-1W with several • Combat Radius*: 58 nm initiatives: • Weapons Stations: Four • Helmet Display and Tracker System (HDTS) • Advanced Precision Kill Weapon System (APKWS) • Empty Weight: 10,750 lbs • 20mm Linkless Feed • Moving Map • Max Gross Weight: 14,750 lbs • Strikelink-A (VMF) • Useful Payload (HOGE): 3,986 lbs Attack Helicopter Shortfall • Cruise Speed : 131 kts • USMC is experiencing a significant shortage of attack helicopters as a result of combat attrition, HMLA expansion, and induction of AH-1Ws into the AH-1Z • Offensive Systems: 20mm cannon, 2.75 rockets, TOW, HELLFIRE with multiple remanufacturing process. The shortfall will be most prevalent from FY12-14 and warhead configurations and AIM-9 Sidewinder FY17-19. • Defensive Systems: AAR-47, ALE-47 Dual Dispenser Pods, ALQ-144, and APR- 39 * (Combat radius includes 30 minutes time on station and a 20 min fuel reserve) Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-13
    • Program Description Program Update The H-1 Upgrades Program, comprised of the UH-1Y and AH-1Z, is a single • The AH-1Z achieved Full Rate Production (FRP) on 28 Nov 2010 and Initial Acquisition Program which leverages 84% commonality of major components, Operational Capability on 24 Feb 2011. enhancing deployability and maintainability while reducing training requirements and logistical footprint. • First deployment of the AH-1Z will be in the fall of 2011 as part of the 11th MEU. “Zulu Build New (ZBN)” was programmed early in an effort to mitigate the This will also the be first “all Upgrades” detachment in which the AH-1Z and UH-1Y significant operational shortfall of AH-1s caused by combat attrition, HMLA deploy alongside one another, showcasing the advantages of 84% commonality. expansion, and AH-1W remanufacturing . Shortfall of USMC attack helicopters is especially pronounced from FY12-14 and FY17-19. The procurement objective is 189 AH-1Zs, 62 of which will be ZBN.AH-1Z Zulu • Combat Radius*: 137 nm 42 AH-1Zs (Lots 1-8) currently on contract. • 18 AH-1Zs delivered to date (as of Sep 11). • Weapons Stations: Six • Empty Weight: 11,700 lbs Digital Systems Upgrade • Addition of digital map system and Strikelink/A digitally-aided • Max Gross Weight : 18,500 lbs close air support messaging capability planned for both the AH-1Z • Useful Payload (HOGE): 5,558 lbs and UH-1Y helicopters beginning FY13. • Cruise Speed: 137 kts APKWS • Offensive Systems: 20mm cannon, 2.75 rockets, HELLFIRE with multiple • Integration of the Advanced Precision Kill Weapon System on AH-1Z warhead configurations and AIM-9 Sidewinder planned for FY12. • Defensive Systems: AAR-47 B(V)2, ALE-47, and APR-39 * (Combat radius includes (8) HELLFIRE, (14) 2.75” rockets, (650) 20mm, 120 chaff and flare, 30 minutes time on station and 20 minute fuel reserve) Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-14
    • Program Description Program Update The CH-53E is a heavy lift helicopter designed to transport heavy equipment • CH-53E First Flight: 1974 and supplies during the ship-to-shore movement of an amphibious assault • Initial Operating Capability: 1981 and during subsequent operations ashore. • Full Operating Capability: 1999 The aircraft is capable of transporting 32,000 lbs externally at a cruise speed of 100 KIAS to a range of 50 NM, hover for 5 minutes, and return. The CH-53E • Transition bulkhead life limit extension (6120 to 10,000 FH): Start – FY was derived from an engineering change proposal to the twin-engine CH-53D. 2006 , projected completion – FY 2019 Improvements include the addition of a third engine to give the aircraft the • Projected Retirement: 2027 ability to lift the majority of the Fleet Marine Forces equipment, a dual point cargo hook system, improved main rotor blades, and composite tail rotor blades. A dual digital automatic flight control system and engine anti-ice system give the aircraft an all-weather capability. The helicopter seats 32 passengers in its normal configuration and has provisions to carry 55 passengers with centerline seats installed. With the dual point hook systems, it can carry external loads at increased airspeeds due to the stability achieved with the dual point system.CH-53E Super Stallion • Empty Weight: 37,500 lbs • Complete Directional IR Countermeasures (DIRCM) installations • Max Weight on Wheels: 69,750 lbs • Complete Integrated Mechanical Diagnostic System (IMDS) installations • Internal Load: 30 troops or 24 litter patients • Critical Survivability Upgrade (CSU): DIRCM threat message to CDNU, Smart • External Load: Hook rated to 36,000 lbs Dispensing, Forward Firing Buckets, Lightweight Armor, SMFCD, Day/Night HUD symbology for VDE, EGI data on 1553 Data bus, AAR-47 Hostile Fire • Max Gross Weight with External load: 73,500 lbs Indication. • Flight Controls: Mechanical • Hot Day Performance Upgrade: Upgrading GE T64-416A with GE T64-419 • External Hook system: Single-point or Dual-point hook system • Condition Based Maintenance study: Analyze IMDS data to develop models • Endurance: 4 hours (unrefueled) / indefinite (HAAR) that will predict component failures. Maintenance is based on component history and real-time operation vice inspection cycles based solely on hours • Max Speed: 150 kts or days since last inspection. • Armament: 2 XM-218 .50 caliber machine guns, 1 Ramp-mount GAU-21 .50 •Continue analyzing sustainment requirements until CH-53K transition. caliber machine gun • ASE: DIRCM, AAR-47(v)2, ALE-47, Dual Dispensing Pods • Network Systems: FBCB2 Blue Force Tracker Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-15
    • Program Description Program Update The CH-53D Sea Stallion is a more-capable version of the CH-53A introduced • CH-53D First Flight: 1969 into the Marine Corps in 1966. The CH-53D is a medium lift helicopter • Initial Operating Capability: 1969 designed to transport personnel, supplies and equipment in support of amphibious and shore operations. • Full Operating Capability: 1984 It is shipboard compatible and capable of transporting internal and external • Service Life Extension to 12,500 FH: Start – FY 2010, Completion – As cargo in adverse weather conditions both day and night. The twin-engine necessary helicopter is capable of lifting 7 tons (6.35 metric tons). Improvements to the • Projected Retirement: 2013 aircraft include T64GE-416 engines, elastomeric rotor head, external range extension fuel tanks and crashworthy fuel cells. The helicopter will carry 32 passengers in its normal configuration and 55 passengers with centerline seats installed. Only safety and survivability improvements will continue to be implemented due to the 5 year sundown rule (FY13).CH-53D Sea Stallion • Hot Day Performance Upgrade: Upgrading GE T64-413 with GE T64-416 • Empty Weight: 23,608 lbs • Quad Flare/Chaff Bucket Installation • Internal Load: 30 troops or 24 litter patients • Service Life Assessment Program to 12,500 flight hours • External Load: Hook rated to 20,000 lbs • Evaluation of CH-53D inventory/parts from U.S. Air Force • Max Gross Weight with External load: 42,000 lbs • Flight Controls: Mechanical • External Hook system: Single-point Hook System • Endurance: 4.5 hours (unrefueled) • Max Speed: 130 kts • Armament: 3 GAU-21 .50 caliber machine guns • ASE: ALQ-157A(V)1 IR Countermeasures (IRCM), AAR-47(V)2, ALE-47, Dual Dispensing Pods • Network Systems: FBCB2 Blue Force Tracker Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-16
    • Program Description Program Update • Passed Milestone B (Initiation of engineering and manufacturing The CH-53K new build helicopter is the only marinized helicopter that can lift development phase) in Dec 05. 100% of the Marine Corps vertical lift equipment from amphibious shipping to inland objectives under high altitude and hot atmospheric conditions. The • System Development Design (SDD) contract awarded in April 2006. aircraft will be capable of externally transporting 27,000 lbs to a range of 110 • Preliminary Design Review completed September 2008 NM in support of the baseline MEB and is the only heavy lift helicopter currently being developed within DoD. • Critical Design Review conducted July 2010 Major system improvements of the new build helicopter include the GE-38- • Ground Test Vehicle Assembly began February 2011 1B 7500 SHP engine, 88,000lbs gross weight airframe, low maintenance drive train and rotorhead, 4th generation composite rotor blades, CAAS cockpit, • First Flight scheduled for FY 2013. Procurement objective 200 aircraft. integrated cargo pallet locking system, and triple hook capability. The CH-53K • Milestone C (Initiation of production and development phase) scheduled is designed to reduce logistics shipboard footprint, reduce operating costs for FY 2015 per aircraft, reduce direct maintenance man hours per flight hours, and significantly reduce threat vulnerable area compared to the CH-53E. • Initial Operating Capability (IOC) scheduled for CY 2018 • Full Operating Capability (FOC) scheduled for FY 2026CH-53K • Empty Weight: 43,750 lbs • GE performance testing of the second GE38-1B engine for the CH-53K • Max Weight on Wheels: 74,500 lbs Program (First engine reached peak 8300 SHP, steady-state 7500 SHP) • Internal Load: 30 troops or 24 litter patients • Sikorsky and PMA-261 in concert with Fleet Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) has just completed a Front End Analysis (FEA) to determine how aircrew and • External Load: Hook rated to 36,000 lbs maintainers will train to operate and maintain the CH-53K. Results will be • Max Gross Weight with External load: 88,000 lbs used to build both aircrew and maintainer Training & Readiness Manuals. • Flight Controls: Fly-by-Wire • Conducting site surveys of Marine Corps bases and amphibious shipping to ensure CH-53K compatibility (Deficiencies noted for future upgrades through • External Hook system: Triple hook system (ability to independently lift and MILCON board). release three separate external loads) • On the horizon: Capability Production Document (CPD), Contract for Low- • Endurance: 4 hours (unrefueled) / indefinite (HAAR) Rate Initial Production (LRIP) aircraft • Max Speed: 170 kts • Armament: 3 GAU-21 .50 caliber machine guns • ASE: Directional IR Countermeasures (DIRCM), • Network Systems: Link-16, VMF, SATCOM Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-17
    • Program Descriptions Program Updates HMX-1 Mission: Provide helicopter transportation for the President of the • VH-71 program terminated by RMD 802 United States, Vice President of the United States, members of the president’s cabinet and foreign dignitaries, as directed by the Director, White House • VXX (Replacement Presidential Vertical Lift Aircraft Program) Military Office (WHMO). • JROC approved ICD Aug 2009 • VH-3D • AoA kick-off Feb 2010 • AoA completed Feb 2011 • 11 aircraft • CDD development underway • Program of Record into TBD (VXX aircraft TBD) • VH-60N • 9 aircraft • Program of Record into TBD (VXX aircraft TBD) • CH-46E • 14 aircraft • Program of Record into FY14 (14 x MV-22B)Presidential Aircraft VH-3D • Weight reduction program • VH-3D Lift Improvement Program • Carson Blades Max Gross Weight (HOGE): • Service Life Extension Program planned FY13 • Additional 200 hours useful life VH-3D – 21,500 pounds • Additional H-3 airframe procured to be used as training asset VH-60N – 22,000 pounds • Developing training aircraft configuration model Cruise Speed: •VH-60N • Cockpit Upgrade Program underway VH-3D – 140 kts • Structural Enhancement Program • Conducted via TIGER team as needed VH-60N – 150 kts • Service Life Extension Program planned FY13 Passenger Load: • Additional 2000 hours useful life • Additional H-60 airframe procured to be used as training asset VH-3D – 10 (plus pilot, co-pilot, and crew chief) • Developing training aircraft configuration model VH-60N – 10 (plus pilot, co-pilot, crew chief, and Communication Systems Operator (CSO)) Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-18
    • Program Description Program Update Mission: Provide time sensitive air transport of high priority passengers and 15,000 Flight hrs expended, design life 20,000 hrs cargo between and within a theater of war. • FY-10 depot level maintenance program transition to “on condition” maintenance regime to extend Description: aircraft service life GulfStream IV twin engine jet C20G. Capable of transporting 26 passengers or • FY-11 equipped aircraft with AN/AAQ24V infrared countermeasure 6,000 lbs of cargo for a maximum range of 4,250 nautical miles. $62 capability against man portable IR missile threat million (new cost). 18 years old, acquired in FY93. HQMC intent to replace with “like in kind” aircraft.C-20G Gulfstream G-IV C-20G: One aircraft. Based in Kaneohe Bay • Range: 4,250 NM • Used to support: • Crew: 2 pilots, 2 crewmen • Commander US MARCENT • Length: 88 ft 4 in • Commander US MARFORPAC • Wingspan: 77 ft 10 in • Height: 24 ft 5 in • OSA missions throughout MARFORPAC AOR • Max takeoff weight: 73,200 lb • Empty weight: 35,500 lb • Powerplant: 2× Rolls-Royce Tay turbofans • Max Speed: M.85/459 KIAS • Cruise Speed: M.85/459 KIAS Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-19
    • Program Description Program Update Mission: Provide time sensitive air transport of high priority passengers and cargo between and within a theater of war. HQMC intent is to replace the (2) C-9s with (2) C-40As. Description: Boeing C-40A is based on Boeing B-737-700C combination passenger/cargo aircraft. Capable of transporting 121 passengers for 3200 nautical miles, or 40,000 lbs of cargo for a maximum range of 2,800 nautical miles.C-40A • Acquisition of USMC C-40A aircraft • Range: 2,800 NM with 40,00lbs cargo • Sustaining C9B until C-40 deliveries 3,200 NM with 121 passengers • Crew: 5 to 8 • Length:110ft 4 in • Wingspan: 112 ft 7 in • Height: 41 ft 2 in • Max takeoff weight: 171,000 lb • Empty weight: 59,700 lb • Power plant: 2 × CFM high bypass turbofan engines • Cruise Speed: M.80/461 KTAS Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-20
    • Program Description Program Update Mission: Provide time sensitive air transport of high priority passengers and cargo between and within a theater of war. HQMC intent is to replace the (2) C-9s with (2) C-40As. Description: Boeing / McDonnell Douglass C-9B. Capable of transporting 90 passengers, or 20,000 lbs of cargo for a maximum range of 1,740 nautical miles. Average Age: 36C-9B • Acquisition of USMC C-40A aircraft • Range:1740 NM with 20,000 lbs • Universal Needs Statement for C-9 Replacement Aircraft validated 2500 NM with 5,000 lbs • Sustaining C9B until C-40 deliveries • Crew: 5 to 8 • FAA SFAR 88 Fuel Tank compliance • Length: 119 ft 3 in • CNS-ATM compliance after 2014 • Wingspan: 93 ft 5 in • Height: 27 ft 6 in • Max takeoff weight: 110,000 lb • Empty weight: 59,700 lb • Powerplant: 2× P&W JT8D-9 turbofan • Max Speed: M.84/340 KIAS • Cruise Speed: M.78/485 KTAS Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-21
    • Program Description Program Update Mission: Provide time sensitive air transport of high priority passengers and HQMC intent to replace current (12) UC-35C/D aircraft with (12) “Super Mid- cargo (limited cargo capability) between and within a theater of war. Size” class transport with improved range and payload capabilities. Description: • UC-35C/D twin engine turbofan. • Capable of transporting 7 passengers or 1,500 lbs of cargo for a maximum range of 1,300 nautical miles. • Cost: $9M (new cost) • Acquired: FY98-06 • ASE: installation • FY07, 4 aircraft. • FY10, 1 SMCR aircraft. • FY11, 1 SMCR aircraftUC-35C/D Citation • Acquisition of “super mid-size” class aircraft. • Range: 1300 NM • Fleet submission of Universal Needs Statement for improved range and • Crew: 2 payload. • Length: 48 ft 11 in • Install ASE “A-Kits” in remaining UC-35D assets. • Wingspan: 52 ft 2 in • Identify improved engine monitoring component. • Height: 15 ft 0 in • Fix false over speed/ over temp indications. • Max takeoff weight: 16,300 lb for C/ 16,830 for D • Empty weight: 9,395 lb for C / 10,642 for D • Powerplant: 2× P&WC JT15-D turbofans • Cruise Speed: M.755/420 KTAS Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-22
    • Program Description Program Update Mission: Provide time sensitive air transport of high Marine Aviation will gradually replace all UC-12F/M with UC-12W Huron priority passengers and cargo between and within aircraft. a theater of war. Description: • Beechcraft UC12F/M (King Air 200) twin engine turbo-prop. • Capable of transporting 7 passengers or 1,500 lbs of cargo for a maximum range of 1,200 nautical miles. • Cost: $6M (new cost) • Average Age: 2 3 YrsUC-12F/M Huron • Acquisition of 6 X USMC UC-12W aircraft to replace legacy UC-12F/M. • Range: 1200 NM • Sustaining UC-12F/M readiness until UC-12W acquisition complete. • Crew: 2 • CNS-ATM compliance • Length: 43 feet 10 inches • No install of Aircraft Survivability Equipment for legacy UC-12B/F planned: • Wingspan: 54 ft 6 in Negative impact to payload. • Height: 15ft 0 in • Max takeoff weight: 12,500 lb • Empty weight: 7,755lb • Powerplant: 2× P&WC PT6A-41/42 turbo-prop • Max Speed: 294 KIAS Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-23
    • Program Description Program Update Mission: Provide time sensitive air transport of high priority passengers and Marine Aviation intent is to replace all UC-12B/F with UC-12W cargo between and within a theater of war. Huron aircraft. Description: • Capable of transporting 8 passengers or 2,500 lbs of cargo for a maximum range of 1,500 nautical miles. • ASE installed. • CNS/ATM compliant • RVSM compliant • Cargo door. • Cost: $9.1MUC-12W Huron • Acquisition of 6 x UC-12W aircraft to replace legacy UC-12F/M • Test & Evaluation of UC-12W unimproved landing zone performance • Range: 1500 NM without ER tanks, 2000 NM with ER tanks • Acquire and retrofit Extended Range Tanks for • Crew: 2 remaining 4 x Block One aircraft • Length: 46 feet 8 inches • Acquire and integrate 3rd forward firing kinematic • Wingspan: 57 ft 11 in flare dispenser for Block One aircraft • Height: 14ft 4 in • Max takeoff weight: 16,500 lb • Empty weight: 10,200lb • Powerplant: 2× P&WC PT6A-60A turbo-prop • Max Speed: 300 KIAS Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-24
    • Program Description Program Update Primarily an aerial reconnaissance system supporting target acquisition and • Fielding designation, command & control and ISR support to the MEF commander and • The RQ-7B has been fully fielded to all (three) active duty squadrons, his subordinate units. • One system has been fielded to VMU-4 (4th MAW). Marine Corps procurement began in 2007 through an existing Army UAS • Payloads program, the Chairman of the Joint Requirements Oversight Council (JROC) • Laser Designator and Communications Relay payloads upgrades have signed the Mission Need Statement (MNS) for this capability in 1990. In 2007, recently been added to the RQ-7B Shadow fleet. Marine Requirements Oversight Council (MROC) adopted JROC documents and • These upgrades have provided an unprecedented level of fires integration authorized procurement to replace RQ-2 Pioneer UAS. and rapid and effective air-ground coordination. Each VMU squadron possesses three RQ-7B systems with each system • Wing extensions and engine upgrades have improved performance for comprised four air vehicles and two ground control stations. VMUs are carrying payload upgrades. organized to provide up to three detachments of 51 Marines each providing up to 12 hours of daily support or deploy as an intact squadron to provide continuous 24 hour daily support.RQ-7B Shadow (MCTUAS) Stand-up of VMU-4 (4th MAW) will complete system fielding when the main Det • Combat Radius - 75nm is established. • Weapons Stations - TBD Upgrades are coordinated via Army PM UAS and include the following efforts: • Empty Weight – 186 lbs • Laser Designator (fielded) • Max Gross Weight & Use Payload - 350 lbs • Universal GCS • TCDL (Tactical Common Data Link) • Top Speed – 105 Kts (dash) • Wing Extension • Cruise Speed w/ Payload – 65 Kts (loiter) • Weaponization • SRP (Software Reprogrammable Payloads) • Offensive Systems – POP300D Laser Designator • Payloads- This MCTUAS requirement will later be fulfilled by a larger and more capable • Communications Relay (VHF/FM) Group-4 system that will replace the RQ-7B (a Group-3 UAS) beginning in FY18. • EO/IR Sensor • Laser Pointer • Laser Designator • Intrepid Tiger IIv(2) EA payload Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-25
    • Program Description Program Update Aerial reconnaissance system supporting tactical situational awareness to • DDL (Digital Data Link) replacing 8 channel analog control link. battalion and company level commanders. The electro-optical or infrared • Fielding of systems now reaching non-infantry units (MAW and MLG optics support surveillance, pre-raid reconnaissance, harassment, deception, units). target acquisition, and battle damage assessment. battalion and company level • OPNAV 3710.7 Interim Change 40 contains general provisions for commander and his subordinate units. standardized flight operations and ORM for Group-1 UAS. • PMA-263 actively scheduling unit training via MTT, to be superseded Smallest and most numerous UAS in the Marine Corps, 461 systems (each with by formal TECOM program. three aircraft) are being fielded to battalion level units across all MARFORs. Four systems are assigned to infantry, LAR, and tank battalions and one system to other units such as artillery, MWSS, CEB, H&S battalions, and MLG units. Two Marines will operate one system with an rechargeable aircraft battery life of 90 minutes.RQ-11B Raven (SUAS) Formalized Training Program • Combat Radius – 15km (DDL) line of site • Contractor MTT is interim solution since program implementation • Max Gross Weight & Use Payload – 4.2 lbs • TECOM/NAVAIR team published NTSP (Naval Training Systems Plan) • Backpack Weight – 17 lbs • NTSP is prerequisite to TECOM funding for formal training program. • Speed – 17 to 44 kts Standard employment tactics and certification Payloads Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff Instruction (CJCSI 3255.01) • Front-look and side-look high-resolution EO camera with electronic Pan-Tilt- • Short Title: Joint Minimum UAS Training Standards (JUMTS) Zoom and digital stabilization; or • Requires common joint training standards. • Sets minimum aeronautical knowledge and standardization for all • 320x240 thermal imager operators Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-26
    • Program Description Program Update Primarily an aerial reconnaissance system supporting target acquisition, • Source selection complete: InSitu RQ-21 Integrator is the STUAS command & control and ISR support to the MEB or MEU commander and their platform. subordinate units. • Fielding priority to operational VMU squadrons • Manpower structure starting in FY12. In 2005, the Marine Requirements Oversight Council validated an urgent need • New Equipment Training (NET) to provide initial conversion training for for aerial reconnaissance support to the MEB/MEU level MAGTF. Source VMU operators selection completed in 4th Qtr FY10 and Insitu RQ-21 Integrator was selected. • Program currently in EMD, with (2) Early Operational Capability (EOC) systems to be used 1Q FY-12 to baseline EMD, inform VMUs on the Each VMU squadron will possesses nine STUAS systems with each system capability, and support PTP at 29 Palms. comprised of five air vehicles and two ground control stations. VMUs are organized to provide up to nine detachments of nine Marines capable of providing 10-24 hours of reconnaissance support to the ground commander.RQ-21A (STUAS)• STUAS is a Group 3 rail launched, Sky Hook recovered UAS; five air vehicles with EO/IR and COMM relay payloads and two GCSs/ system.• Launcher, Sky Hook, RVTs, associated support equipment and (6) HMMWVs per system• Permanent Maintenance. Logistics and Training TBD after two years of contractor provided support.• 150 lbs, Dual EO/IR Camera, 10+ hours endurance, and 50+ nm range. Capable of operating ashore and from ships in support of MEU/ARG • Combat Radius – 50nm (min) • Max Gross Weight & Use Payload - 150 lbs (max) • Top Speed - 85 Kts (min) • Offensive Systems – Laser Designator Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-27
    • Program Description Program Update Provides an organic, precision, unmanned, aerial resupply capability in order to minimize loss of personnel, equipment and supplies on • Program managed by PMA 266; blue and green dollar funding ground resupply missions and to provide an alternate means of aerial • GOCO Cargo UAS contract was awarded to two vendors: Boeing A160 delivery when weather, terrain or enemy pose and unsuitable risk to Hummingbird and Kaman/Lockheed Martin Kmax. rotary wing (RW) assets. • Both vendors will conduct a Quick Reaction Assessment (QRA) at 29 Palms summer FY11 Contract cargo UAS service sought via MARCETN JUONS in January • One vendor will be selected for a six (6) month MUA deployment to OEF in 1Q 2010. J8 approved JUONS and assigned to USMC by Joint Rapid FY12 Acquisition Cell, (JRAC) for immediate USMC resolution. • Vertical lift capable of carrying an external load of 750 to 2500 lbs / resupplying up to 6K lbs per day / 50+ nm range / day& night operations.Cargo UAS• Potential for the second vendor to deploy to OEF following initial MUA • Combat Radius - 124nm• VMU will support MUA with COR, MC and terminal area control. • Top Speed – 70 kts• MCCDC has lead on developing enduring POR requirements; coordinating with IL , Army and Navy on Joint Cargo UA requirements. • Delivery Accuracy – 10m (BLOS) • Payload Capability – 750 lbs at 12,000’MSL (HOGE) Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-28
    • Program Description Program Update Composite Tracking Network (CTN): The CTN system is comprised of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) and non-development item (NDI) subsystems • CTN ORD Change 1 approved 27 June 2001 adapted from the USN Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC). • CEC Operational and Organizational Concept (O&O) approved 12 Apr 06 The CTN system will interface with C2 systems and sensors to provide the •USMC led with US Navy and US Army cooperation MAGTF and joint task force commanders a ground-based sensor netting solution that correlates sensor measurement data (target velocity and • MS C Decision (Oct 08) position) from local and remote radars into the CEC network. This data • IOT&E (Aug-Sep 09) effectively will increase situational awareness by providing accurate, composite, real-time surveillance tracks to support Sea Shield and Naval • FRP/Limited Fielding Decision (Apr 10) Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air. • FOT&E (Aug 10) CTN will provide the MAGTF with: increased track quality, improved track • IOC (Apr 11) continuity, real-time sensor networking, enhanced situational awareness (SA) • FOC (May 16) and interoperability, and a single integrated air picture that supports engagement decision and execution.CTN •Develop C2 interface to MTAOM and CAC2S •MTAOM-CTN-AN/TPS-59 integration event Feb 12 •Complete manpower assessment to support fielding of full AAO •Initial AAO: 10 •Fielding decision was limited to 10 of the 25 systems due to incomplete assessment of manpower workload analysis across the •Additional systems to be fielded to bring the AAO to 25 entire MACCS. •Currently fielded systems do not have a C2 interface. Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-29
    • Program Description Program Update The Common Aviation Command and Control System is the command and •ACAT I MAIS designated Dec 07 control component of the Aviation C2 family of systems. The CAC2S will replace six legacy platforms and provides an expeditionary and common C2 • Milestone C approved in Nov 2010 platform for Marine Aviation that is employable from the sea base and ashore. •Phase 1 IOT&E completed in Apr 2011 As a joint force C2 enabler, the CAC2S will help transform EMW concepts into capabilities that will fully support joint operations •Phase 1 Interim Full Deployment Decision granted Sep 2011 • CAC2S is an ACAT I MAIS program and the cornerstone of the MACCS, • Phase 1 IOC: FY12 providing aviation command posts, air defense, air support, air operations, and • Phase 2 FOC: FY18 air traffic control capabilities • Expeditionary: Self-deployable from the sea with organic lift • Scalable: Individual Marine portable to Tactical Air Command Center in support of a major theater of war • Flexible: Multi-function operation centers (sea based, and ground based) • CAC2S fuses real-time/non-real-time data providing a common operational picture at every CAC2S nodeCAC2S • The CAC2S program was restructured in 2009 and will be developed and fielded in 2 phases. • The CAC2S will be comprised of three primary components. The processing • AAO: 50 PDS, 75 CS, 39 SDS and display sub-system (PDS), Communications sub-system (CS) and Sensor • Key Performance Parameters: data sub-system (SDS) • Net Ready • Phase 1 will leverage existing MACCS C2 systems and provide an initial improved situational awareness and command capability. The development in • Data Fusion this phase will focus on the PDS and CS. • Scalable: 8 – 160+ operator positions • Phase 2 will provide the full CAC2S capability as outlined in the capabilities production document. • CAC2S software is the foundation for MAGTF C2 Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-30
    • Program Description Program Update The AN/TPS-59 (V3) is a 3D long range radar. It is the primary sensor for the In Operations Support/Sustainment Phase of Acquisition Life Cycle MACCS and provides the MAGTF with airspace surveillance of Air Breathing Targets & Theater Ballistic Missiles. • Executing Post Production Modification I (control shelter tech refresh) • IOC = Nov 2010 / May 2011 • Fielded in 1985 • FOC = Apr 2011 / Oct 2011 • Upgraded in 1998 (Theater Ballistic Missile capability) • Post Production Modification II (Mode 5, future DMS and obsolescence efforts) • Post production sustainment efforts keep radar viable against threats • MS C = Nov 2012 / May 2013 • As part of CEC/CTN network, will provide early warning and situational • IOC = Oct 2014 / Apr 2015 awareness updates to other sensors and weapons platforms • FOC = Sep 2015 / Mar 2016 • On-going technology development and risk reduction efforts include: • Antenna Transmitter Group improvements • Transmit / Receive module improvementsAN/TPS-59 (V3) • Designated a Special Interest Program by OSD AT&L in Feb 2009 • Designation will not preclude USMC requirement to sustain legacy AN/TPS- 59 or to improve the array to address DMS / obsolescence issues • HQMC DCA guidance to sustain radar to 2025 (Jul 2009). Addressed by MACS-4 1 MAW 2 Program Office through incremental Engineering Change Proposals and Tech MACS-2 2 MAW 2 Refresh Initiatives to address Diminishing Manufacturing Sources (DMS) and MACS-1 3 MAW 2 Obsolescence. MACS -23/24 4 MAW 2 • Updated Acquisition Program Baseline (APB) approved 9 Apr 10 MCTSSA Camp Pendleton, CA 1 MCCES 29 Palms, CA 1 • TPS-59 ORD Letter of Clarification 12 Apr 11 MCLB Albany, GA 1 Total 11 Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-31
    • Program Description Program Update • Designated an OSD ATL Special Interest Program February 2009 The Ground/Air Task Oriented Radar (G/ATOR) is a 3D, short/medium range • MROC endorsed new program plan March 2010 multi-role radar designed to detect unmanned aerial systems, cruise missiles, air breathing targets, rockets, artillery and mortars. Increment I • MS B Approval on August 2005 G/ATOR satisfies warfighters’ expeditionary needs across MAGTF spectrum and • Awarded SDD Phase Contract March 2007 replaces five legacy radar systems with a single MAGTF solution. • Critical Design Review completed March 2009 G/ATOR performs air surveillance/defense, air traffic control, and ground Increment II weapons locating missions. • Technical Readiness Assessment • Completed April 2008 Increment IV • Draft CDD in MCATS (service) staffing • Pending ACAT re-designation to 1C/AD • IOC: FY16 • FOC: FY26G/ATOR The G/ATOR program will be developed in three increments. • Inc I - Air Defense/Surveillance Radar (ADSR) replaces the AN/UPS-3 Tactical Defense Alert Radar, the AN/MPQ-62 Continuous Wave Acquisition Radar, and the AN/TPS-63 Air Surveillance radar. • Inc II - Ground Weapons Locating Radar (GWLR) replaces the AN/TPQ-46 Counter-Battery/Target Acquisition Radar • Inc IV - Expeditionary Airport Surveillance Radar (EASR) will replace the AN/TPS-73 Airport Surveillance Radar • Inc I: Air Defense/Surveillance Radar (ADSR) Qty 17 • Inc II: Ground Weapons Locating Radar (GWLR) Qty 38 • Inc IV: Expeditionary Airport Surveillance Radar (EASR) Qty 12 AAO Qty 67 Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-32
    • Program Description Program Update The METMF (R) NEXGEN is a highly mobile, fully integrated, FORCENet • Program has reached a Milestone “C” decision and is entering price negotiations compliant USMC tactical meteorological support system that is replacing the with the vendor. A sole-source contract award is expected in November 2011 to METMF (R) legacy system. The system delivers relevant, timely METOC procure three FMF variants and upgrade to two existing testing systems. products and mission impact assessments via Common Operating Picture to the MAGTF. • FY12 OPN and OCO will procure an additional five FMF fielded systems. • METMF(R) NEXGEN was a FY11 ACAT IV new start • Rapidly deployable sensor suites with stand-alone capability: Surface Sensors, Upper Air System, Meteorological Satellites Receiver, & Doppler RADAR • Production: Mesoscale NOWCAST Model, Forecaster’s Tool Kit, & Tactical Decision AidsMETMF(R) NEXGEN• Current funding supports the procurement of eight FMF fielded units, one The MAGTF METMF(R) NEXGEN will consist of the following Commercial-off-training variant for the formal schools and one In-service Engineering Activity the-Shelf, Govt-off-the-Shelf & Non Developmental Items capabilities:(PMW120) variant. • Processing • Meteorological Satellite• Additional funding is required to reach the Approved Acquisition Objective of • Meteorological Radarthirteen. • Local Sensor • Remote Sensors • Upper Air Sounding- Balloon/Box • Communications (i.e., HF, UHF, VHF, SIPRNET) • Shelter (portable, HMMWV-like) • Scalable • Modular • Portable, mobile shelter • Single C-130 transport • Fully Integrated, Net Ready Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-33
    • Program Description Program Update This initiative replaces the A/S32P-19A Aircraft Crash and Structure Fire POM-12 Fighting Truck, TAMCN D1064, known as the P-19A. The P-19A, introduced into • $19.1M seed money redirected from another program by LID; new service in 1984, with a service life of 12 years, has undergone depot level start Program of Record rebuild two times. • SECDEF via P&R authorized additional funding to WIPEB which the • The P-19A is the Marine Corps’ only major Aircraft Fire Fighting Vehicle P-19 received $128.2M across the FYDP to FY17. APPN FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FYDP • This vehicle is utilized at Marine Corps Air Stations and Forward Operating RDTEN $2,286 $6,510 $3,563 $0 $0 $0 $12,359 Bases for immediate response to aircraft emergencies (primary) and structural fires (secondary). PMC $0 $0 $11,940 $36,297 $27,540 $33,729 $109,506 OMMC $0 $0 $618 $1,064 $1,226 $1,511 $4,419 • The P-19A Replacement will be employed by the Marine Wing Support OTHER $0 $0 $0 $0 $943 $960 $1,903 Squadrons of the Marine Aircraft Wings and by the Marine Corps Air Stations firefighters supporting flight operations. TOTAL $2,286 $6,510 $16,121 $37,361 $28,766 $35,240 $128,187 • The P-19A Replacement provides rescue and aircraft fire fighting capabilities to permanent and expeditionary airfields throughout the Marine Corps.P-19 FFV Replacement • P-19A Replacement Initial Operational Capability (IOC) is planned for Fiscal • 4-man crew Year (FY) 2016. IOC is achieved when one MAW has received a complete issue of P-19A Replacements, the assigned mechanics and crews have received initial • 1,000 gallon water tank, 130 gallon foam concentrate tank training at the Operator/Crew, Field and Sustainment levels and sufficient repair • Pump output of 750 gallons per minute (GPM) or greater parts are in place to support operations. • EPA approved chemical firefighting agent (minimum of 500 lbs) • P-19A Replacement Full Operational Capability (FOC) is desired by FY 2017 to • National Fire Protection Association Standard 414 compliant meet the Approved Acquisition Objective (AAO) of 166. • JP-8 capable with range of 150 miles @ 55 mph • MARCORSYSCOM and I&L proceeding with the SLEP of MWSS and MCAS P- • 0 to 50 mph in 25 seconds or less 19As to extend service life . • Alternate Power Unit (APU) to reduce engine idle time • Coordinating potential Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) solution with minimal • Capability to draft water from a static supply source (structural panel- tactical modifications (Co-advocates from HQMC AVN and I&L (LFS)). equipped) Working Issues Performance / Systems 17-34