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Maximizing Results: The lean approach to driving innovation, user delight, and business value.

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Agile project management has exploded over the last decade to address the failures of traditional approaches. But more is not always better. The secret is to strategically direct the lean power of …

Agile project management has exploded over the last decade to address the failures of traditional approaches. But more is not always better. The secret is to strategically direct the lean power of agile. In this session we will build a product management framework to maximize innovation, user delight and business impact.

For decades the gold standard for measuring project success has been the project management iron triangle: on time, on budget, on scope. Despite increasingly more rigorous planning strategies, the average project is still 45% over budget, delayed by 63% and missing 1/3 of the promised functionality.

Worse yet, this obsession with certainty is reducing quality, innovation and value while burning out web development teams - and things are only getting more difficult.

Agile project management has exploded over the last decade to address the failures of traditional approaches. Agile methodologies have certainly enabled teams to deliver more features with higher efficiently.

But more is not always better. Too often product owners and dev teams develop feature tunnel vision; running ever faster in the wrong directions.

The secret is to strategically direct the lean power of agile. In this session we will build a product management framework to maximize innovation, user delight and business impact.

Published in: Business, Technology, Design

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  • Whenever I present I always like to get a feel for who is in the room.How many people here are owners of Drupal website?How many are builders of Drupal websites?How many are thinking about getting into Drupal?How many have done SEO on a Drupal site?How many people are new to Drupal SEO?How many people don’t even know what SEO is?
  • You might be saying wow that is a lot of planning. Why is it important to do that planning
  • So the question is how to you get to the top of the food chain?[do the speel]
  • There is a
  • This is how a traditional process for building a website. Or I should say, this is how a traditional website is supposed to be planned. Many larger sites are planned this way, but often to save cost steps might be skipped.
  • Our first web project at LevelTen back in 1999 was truly a big design up front. Planning took 6 months. Numerous meetings, interviews, surveys, user focus groups, wireframes, UML based functional specs.
  • Then then 2001 recession hit. People no longer wanted to spend six figures on project planning. The shift was on to compressed planning phases. I call this mid design up front. The primary focus of MDUF was quickly gathering the stakeholders requirements and engineering just enough to get a reasonable estimate for budgets and timelines.
  • So how successful do you think these the big and midsized design up front process was at brining projects in on time, on budget, and in scope?[show slide]Pretty horrible. The average project is 45% over budget, 63% late and missing 1/3 of the originally promised features.…We already know that we are not getting long term value from the certainty we are generating. But it turns out that we are not even getting certainty. Which of course means we are spending time that is actually just a waste.
  • There is another significant problem with traditional waterfall processes. We force stakeholders to make the big decisions when they know the least amount about the best solution. So certainty also means that stakeholders get less of what they want.So how do we fix these problems? How do we get better certainty in our projects with more accurate estimates, understand better what the stakeholders want? More planning right?
  • So here is the typical project. Stakeholder recognizes that people like Facebook. Thinks, ah ha, what if we had a company extranet like Facebook, people would like us. Puts together a few pages of things facebook does, mashes in some linkedin, Twitter, and YouTube. Sends the project out for bit to a half dozen companies.
  • Install DAMP, import OE Core
  • You might be saying wow that is a lot of planning. Why is it important to do that planning
  • Agile processes are
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • So the question is how to you get to the top of the food chain?[do the speel]
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • There is a general perception that website requirements are something that exist somewhere out in the ethos and all we have to do is go out and gather them. The reality is that not all requirements are known at the beginning of a project. Most certainly not the best ways of build things is understood at the beginning of a project.The process we are going to use for rapid, light-weight requirements gathering is like trawling for fish. We start by casting out a wide net with a wide mesh. We are looking to quickly capture the big, most important requirements. We can then later use a finer mesh net to capture more detailed requirements.The important thing to remember is that agile requirements are not something that is done once at the beginning of a project and set in stone. The are revisited periodically throughout the project and iterated over. Don’t waste time adding details till just befom you really need it.Robertson and Robertson (1999) from User Stories Applied p 43
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • Backlog is constantly reprioritize so that the most valuable tasks are done first. The job of agile is to fuel the backlog with innovative ideas and be excellent at executing.Artifacts:Product backlog, sprint backlog, sprint burndown, releaseburndownTimeboxes: Sprint planning, sprint, daily standup/scrum, sprint review, sprint retro, release planning
  • Backlog is constantly reprioritize so that the most valuable tasks are done first. The job of agile is to fuel the backlog with innovative ideas and be excellent at executing.Artifacts:Product backlog, sprint backlog, sprint burndown, releaseburndownTimeboxes: Sprint planning, sprint, daily standup/scrum, sprint review, sprint retro, release planning
  • Backlog is constantly reprioritize so that the most valuable tasks are done first. The job of agile is to fuel the backlog with innovative ideas and be excellent at executing.Artifacts:Product backlog, sprint backlog, sprint burndown, releaseburndownTimeboxes: Sprint planning, sprint, daily standup/scrum, sprint review, sprint retro, release planning
  • Backlog is constantly reprioritize so that the most valuable tasks are done first. The job of agile is to fuel the backlog with innovative ideas and be excellent at executing.Artifacts:Product backlog, sprint backlog, sprint burndown, releaseburndownTimeboxes: Sprint planning, sprint, daily standup/scrum, sprint review, sprint retro, release planning
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • There are two sides to innovation. The first is emboded in the concept of Kaizen, which is Japanese for continual improvement.
  • TODO: discuss customer champion pyramid
  • It powers some of the world’s top websites such as whitehouse.gov, The Economist and Examiner, all of Sony / BMG’s mission websites.
  • Transcript

    • 1. [MM.DD..YY] [PRESENTER]Nov 19, 2011 Building results-oriented web projectsMaximize Results:The LeanAgile Approachflickr.com/photos/cuppini/2719863711
    • 2. Why do we plan?• Look and feel• FeaturesStakeholder utility• On time• On budget• In ScopeCertainty• Emotional branding• Content• Features• Usability & ExperienceEnd user utility• Increased revenue• Reduced cost• Increased goodwillOrganizational returns
    • 3. Why should we plan?certaintystakeholderutilityuserexperiencereturnswaste1. Maximizeorganizationalreturns2. Optimize userexperience3. Reduce waste
    • 4. process
    • 5. Traditional web development processRequirements• Concept• High-level requirements• Requirements gathering• Requirements specDesign• Product (UI) Design• Wireframes• Detailed Design• Functional specsImplementation• Creative design• Content• DevelopmentVerification• Unit testing• Acceptance testing• Beta testingMaintenanceplanningdevelopmentlive
    • 6. Big Design Up Frontcertaintystakeholderutilityuserexperiencereturnswaste6 months$
    • 7. Mid Design Up Frontcertaintystakeholderutilityuserexperiencereturnswaste6 weeks$
    • 8. Where to gocertainty$valuewastecost $ $AgileBig DUFMid DUF
    • 9. A better approachRequirementsDesignImplementationVerificationwebsite6 monthswaterfallRequirementsDesignImplementationVerificationfeatures2 weeksagile
    • 10. Planning for certaintysource: blogs.msdn.com/b/dannawi/archive/2009/05/15/2009-standish-chaos-report-we-are-successful-in-the-failure.aspxcertainty waste=certainty no longterm value=
    • 11. Getting what you want vs. knowing what you wanttimeinnovationhigh levelrequirementsdesign &architecturemockups validation liveFreedom to innovateInsight to innovatecertainty less value=valuemore money= $
    • 12. Fumbling towards estimates
    • 13. The McCracken Uncertainty PrincipleThe higher the feature velocity of aproject, the less precise theresources needed can be predicted
    • 14. Redefining successtraditional project management focuses on being on time and on budgetscopetimebudgetvalueconstraints qualityresults oriented focus on building the right thing and driving innovation
    • 15. Light weight planningcertaintystakeholderutilityuserexperiencereturnswaste2 weeks$
    • 16. Results oriented light weight planningcertaintystakeholderutilityuserexperiencereturnswaste4 weeks$$
    • 17. The planonlineresultsa.k.a more of the right stuffagile projectmanagementresults orienteduser-centeredplanningmorestufftherightstuff
    • 18. mindset
    • 19. titleadopt a resultsoriented visionflickr.com/photos/airiklopez/70286087991.
    • 20. The right visionflickr.com/photos/ncreedplayer/5403123930 flickr.com/photos/masoncooper/456641277
    • 21. Do only what provides the most valueonly do whatprovides the mostvalue1i.flickr.com/photos/whiskeytango/2098182380
    • 22. titlebe usercentric2.flickr.com/photos/havovubu/3728604649
    • 23. titlelisten2i.
    • 24. titleengage& delight2ii.
    • 25. Amazon’s first homepage
    • 26. Google’s first homepage
    • 27. title continuallyinnovate3.
    • 28. titlebe empirical;experiment,measure,learn, repeat3i.flickr.com/photos/opacity/4028771622
    • 29. titleBe lean:Launch MVPs3ii.flickr.com/photos/opacity/4028771622
    • 30. planning
    • 31. ModelsArtifacts• User role models• User stories• Content models• Results models
    • 32. User role modelingProcess• Brainstorm• Organize• Consolidate & refine• Define• PrioritizeDefinition:a collection of definingattributes that characterizea population of users andtheir goals, needs andintended interaction withthe site
    • 33. User role modeling: brainstormlocal newspapersports bloggerwebsiteadministratorhotels that needbikes for guestspeople from outof townfansstaffnew bike riderbike shoppersperson whowants to upgradetheir bikecompetitive riderbike ownersjob seekersnew mom/parentcasual bikerstour guide
    • 34. User role modeling: organizelocal newspapersports bloggerpeople from outof townfansstaffbike shoppersperson whowants to upgradetheir bikebike ownersjob seekersnew mom/parentwebsiteadministratorhotels that needbikes for gueststour guidecompetitive ridercasual bikersnew bike rider
    • 35. User role modeling: consolidate & refinelocal newspapersports bloggerfansstaffbike shoppersbike owners job seekersnew mom/parent websiteadministratortour guidecasual bikersnew bike riderperson whowants to upgradetheir bikeenthusiasts shoppers staffrenterspeople from outof townhotels that needbikes for guestsownerscompetitive riderjob seekers
    • 36. User role modeling: defineownersDemographics• Age: 25-55• Gender: 65% male• Location: within 10 miles of storePsychographics• Active lifestyle• Prefers being outdoors• GreenBehavioral• Significant web usage including search engines and social media• Research purchases online before buying• Significant use of mobile devicesBrand• Custom service is significant driver for brand loyalty• Likely to buy again from same store. Typically 1 bike every 4 years.Site• Proficient web user• Likely to have high speed internet access
    • 37. User role modeling: personasrenter
    • 38. User role modeling: prioritizeenthusiastsshoppersstaffrentersownersjob seekersPrimary Secondary Tertiary
    • 39. User storiesProcess• Brainstorm• Organize & refine• PrioritizeDefinition:describes a features andfunctionality of the site fromthe viewpoint of a user role
    • 40. Trawling for requirements
    • 41. User stories: formatAs a [user role]I want [a feature or goal]so that [a benefit or reason]* so that is optionalA user story is a documentedrequirement and a note to discuss later
    • 42. User stories: brainstormAs a Bike Enthusiast, I would like to• read the latest bike shop news/blog• comment on the blog• share content through email and social media• see a calendar of events, classes, races• sign up for newsletter and alerts• see special offers• get contact information• see location and hours of operation
    • 43. User stories: prioritizeMoSCoW approach• Must haves – we need these stories in order to launch theproject• Should haves – these are of high importance, but are notshow stoppers for the next release• Could haves – If we get a couple of these in it would benice, but they can be moved easily to the next release• Wants – These are not a priority but we want to keep trackof them as possibilities for future releases.
    • 44. Results modelingProcess• Brainstorm• Organize• Consolidate & refine• PrioritizeDefinition:the benefits stakeholderswant to achieve with thesite.
    • 45. Results modeling: types of results modelsobjectivesvaluedeventsgoals
    • 46. Results modeling: brainstormincrease bikesalesbecome arecognized leaderin the local bikingcommunityShow thepictorial historyof results bikesThe site shouldbe intuitive andeasy to navigateThe site shouldhave a clean andprofessional lookBe more viralTo increasetraffic to the siteIncrease bikerentals by 100%Reduce routinecustomer callinquires by 50%Sell more bikerepair servicesSell more bikesonlineDouble ourmailing listStaff should beable to add andedit contentExpand ourdigital footprintGet 500 “Likes”on FacebookVisitors should beable to find whatthey want in nomore than 3 clicks
    • 47. Results modeling: organizeincrease bikesalesbecome arecognized leaderin the local bikingcommunityShow thepictorial historyof results bikesThe site shouldbe intuitive andeasy to navigateThe site shouldhave a clean andprofessional lookBe more viralTo increasetraffic to the siteIncrease bikerentals by 100%Reduce routinecustomer callinquires by 50%Sell more bikerepair servicesSell more bikesonlineDouble ourmailing listStaff should beable to add andedit contentExpand ourdigital footprintGet 500 “Likes”on FacebookVisitors should beable to find whatthey want in nomore than 3 clicks
    • 48. Results modeling: consolidateincrease bikesalesbecome arecognized leaderin the local bikingcommunityShow thepictorial historyof results bikesThe site shouldbe intuitive andeasy to navigateThe site shouldhave a clean andprofessional lookBe more viralTo increasetraffic to the siteIncrease bikerentals by 100%Reduce routinecustomer callinquires by 50%Sell more bikerepair servicesSell more bikesonlineDouble ourmailing listStaff should beable to add andedit contentExpand ourdigital footprintGet 500 “Likes”on FacebookVisitors should beable to find whatthey want in nomore than 3 clicksGoals Objectives FeaturesValued events
    • 49. Results modeling: refineincrease bikesalesGoals Objectives Valued eventsIncrease by salesby 50% a monthwithin 6 monthsBike purchaseValue = 40% ofthe retail price
    • 50. Results modeling: prioritizeincrease bikesalesbecome arecognized leaderin the local bikingcommunityThe site shouldbe intuitive andeasy to navigateThe site shouldhave a clean andprofessional lookBe more viralTo increasetraffic to the siteSell more bikerepair servicesSell more bikesonlineExpand ourdigital footprintPrimary Secondary Tertiary
    • 51. value driven processresultsvision(3-6 months)
    • 52. iterating
    • 53. Five Disciplines of a Learning Organizations1. Personal mastery – commitment by an individual to the process oflearning (driven by creative tension)2. Mental models – assumptions (best practices) held by individuals andorganizations. Models must be challenged.3. Shared vision – creates a common identity that provides focus andenergy for learning. Built on the individual visions of staff at all levels.4. Team learning – ability of the team to learn and think as a wholewhere the sum is greater than the parts. Driven by open dialogue,discussion, shared meaning and shared understanding.5. Systems thinking – A conceptual framework that allows people tostudy businesses as a bounded objects (close systems). Created bymaking all characteristics apparent at once, in particular connectionsbetween cause and effect (feedback).http://www.flickr.com/photos/rytc/282673909
    • 54. How Scrum drives innovation•Personal mastery•Learning accountability: held accountable to the team on a daily and sprintlybasis•Cannot do things half way; must meet the definition of done• Mental models•Challenged and adapted on a regular basis in sprint retros•Allows and encourages frequent observation•Shared vision•Develops from sprint planning and backlog grooming•Tuned in daily standups•Team learning•Paired development; work is highly collaborative.•Dialoging is encouraged in sprint planning, daily standups and sprint retros•Systems thinking•Sprint reviews enable continuous inspection and adaption on the product•Sprint retro enables continuous inspection and adaption on the process
    • 55. listen to your teamresultsvision(3-6 months)• Technical• ResultsTeam
    • 56. listen to your users (customers)resultsvision(3-6 months)• Behavior• OpinionsTeamUsers
    • 57. listen to your employeesresultsvision(3-6 months)• Feedback• InterviewTeamUsersEmployees
    • 58. Listen and think• Tyranny of the ones• Statistically significant• User roles and results models asguides
    • 59. Experimentsrefinementlearning drivencritical thinkingbreakthroughinspiration drivencreative thinking
    • 60. five disciplines of web leadersbestpracticeshypothesizeexperimentmeasurerefine
    • 61. Summary1. Don’t obsess over certainty, you willget more done.2. Software is for the end users, get outof your head and into theirs3. It is about benefits, not features.Results should be a continual focus.4. Launch quickly & improve continually5. Always be experimenting 90%refinement, 10% breakthroughs
    • 62. thank you!Tom McCrackenLevelTen InteractiveDirectorPhone: 214.887.8586Email: tom@leveltendesign.comTwitter: @levelten_tomBlog: getlevelten.com/blog/tomLinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/tommccracken