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20120414 satipatthana practice and lotus sutra chpapter 6
 

20120414 satipatthana practice and lotus sutra chpapter 6

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Introduction to Meditation and Buddhism Vipasanna

Introduction to Meditation and Buddhism Vipasanna

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    20120414 satipatthana practice and lotus sutra chpapter 6 20120414 satipatthana practice and lotus sutra chpapter 6 Presentation Transcript

    • Buddhist Association of Canada Cham Shan Temple Updated Mar 2010
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Cham Shan Templená mó fó tuó南 無 佛 陀 Namo Buddhaná mó dá mó南 無 達 摩 Namo Dharmaná mó sēng qié南 無 僧 伽 Namo Sangha Updated Mar 2010
    • Buddhist Association of CanadaEssentials of InsightMeditation PracticeA Pragmatic Approach to Vipassana Meditation 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada The Main Aim of Buddhist MeditationThe main aim is to purify the mind of all negative tendencies—such as greed, anger and delusion, through mind control. When all negative tendencies are removed, the mind will be clear and freed from suffering.The actual aim is very exalted, as it aims at the complete eradication of suffering. This process does not only happen in or cover one existence, it spans over limitless existences. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Insight meditation Insight meditation does not just involve holding the mindstill. It also involves penetrative observation and absorption.This kind of penetrative , allows the mind to realize thetrue nature of things as they really are, things like the natureof our mind and body processes, the nature of the personand the nature of the world. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Three factors in mindfulness1. The 1st factor is clarity of the mind. The mind is clear and pure—clear from all greed, anger, dullness, delusion and hallucination.2. The 2nd factor is stability, calmness and peace. The mind is in the state of serenity, steadiness and non-violence even in an adverse condition.3. The third factor is alertness of the mind. The mind becomes sensitive and alert at meditation object and all the conditions and cause&effect associated with it. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada The Purpose of Meditation Practice1. To keep the mind in the present moment.2. To keep mindfulness clear, calm and in the present moment.3. To see what is happening to our meditation object.In walking meditation, the object of the mindfulness is the walkingprocess.In sitting meditation, the object is the “rising” and “falling” process of theabdomen.In other daily activities, the object is to know what we are doing. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Satipatthana Vipassana Meditationn四念住 Kayanupassana Satipatthana (Mindfulness of Body) Vedananupassana Satipatthana (Mindfulness of Feelings) Cittanupassana Satipatthana (Mindfulness of Mind) Dhammanupassana Satipatthana (Mindfulness of Phenomena) 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada What is Mindfulness?Mindfulness is a mental state often described as “thoroughness”,“alertness” or “awareness.”When one is mindful, there is, at that moment of mindfulness, no greed,anger, or delusion. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Experience the Truth1. To experience the truth directly one cannot speculate or have ideas about it. It can be realized only through bare attention.2. When one is mindful without thinking at the present moment, it means that one is not to think about the past or future.3. Mindfulness can only dwell in the present occurrence of a phenomena.4. “One should be mindful with bare attention on the presently occurring phenomena which appears to the mind as a specific characteristic.” 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Experience the TruthWith increased mindfulness, one will get to see therelationships of true characteristics with one another.This will lead to direct experience of the three generalcharacteristics of existence—Dukkha, Anicca,andAnatta (suffering, impermanence, and non-self).The end result is the elimination of defilements andtherefore, suffering. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada MINDFULNESS OF THE BODY (Kayanupassana Satipatthana)1. In practice of sitting meditation, one notes “sitting” and “touching”.2. Do not visualize or analyze body if it is real or not real. The proper way is just to watch and experience the sitting phenomena.3. Observe with bare attention i.e. the elements of wind expressed in tension, firmness, supporting, pulling, vibration, breathing, etc.4. As one watches with just bare attention, it becomes clearly evident that there is in the body but just physical processes or forces taking place. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada MINDFULNESS OF THE BODY (Kayanupassana Satipatthana)1. With stronger mindfulness, one sees these processes changing in diverse ways.2. It helps us hold our mind to the meditation object.3. It helps us to develop the concentration through mindfulness and bare attention, which sees the realities that occur in the object.4. We cannot choose what we see; we only direct our mindfulness to the “window” and observe whatever arises and falls. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada MINDFULNESS ON TOUCHING1. One initially observes the area where the posterior and legs are in contact with the seat.2. Recognize number of touch points.3. One can watch these touch points systematically to increase concentration.4. The time spent in observing one point varies with the state of mind and clarity of the object. The clearer the object, the longer one can watch it.5. If it is vague and one is sleepy, one should move more quickly from one object to another.6. Watch the characteristics of the elements arising and passing away when we note “touching”. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada MINDFULNESS ON TOUCHING1. When one watches the rise and fall, one is actually noting the wind element as expressed by movement or motion. Ultimately, one also watches many other things. This is to help us build up our concentration.2. In no way should one be obsessed with the rise and fall to the extent that we try to “hold on” to it or control it (by unnatural breathing).3. Do not watch the breathing at the tip of the nose or lips.4. Do not visualize, count or control breathing.5. Right Concentration, aimed at realities with mindfulness rather than concentration being predominant, is developed.6. Vipassana basically means watching realities.7. The three characteristics of suffering, change and non-self are clearly manifested more and more. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada DAILY ACTIVITIES1. Be mindful on eating, chewing, answering calls, watch TV, wearing clothes, talking, remaining silent, looking in front or thinking, etc.2. You have to train your mind to be mindful, at all times and in all aspects of life; Only then will it be powerful, penetrative and useful.3. There is no time and condition where mindfulness cannot be developed. There are many things to discover in our daily activities.4. As for the mindfulness of the body, a Sutra says that it is the one thing that has to be learned. If we perfect it, we shall, it assures us, attain the highest freedom. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Questions and Comments 討論www.ChamShanTemple.orgwww.shengguangshi.blogspot.comshengguangShi@gmail.comShengguang Shi 釋聖光Tom Cheung 張相棠Kam Cheung 張仁勤Dennis A. Yap 葉普智Rodolfo Rivas 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada回向 yuàn xiāo zhàng zhū fán năo s ā nParinamana (Transfer of Merit) 願消三障諸煩惱 We wish to rid ourselves of the three hindrances and all klesas. yuàn dé zhì huì zhēn míng l ĭ a o 願得智慧 真 明了 We wish to gain wisdom and real understanding. pŭ yuàn zuì zhàng xī chú x i ā o 普願罪障悉消除 We wish all sinful hindrances to be totally eradicated. shì shì cháng xíng pú sà dào 世世常行菩薩道 In one life after another we always follow Bodhisattvas’ paths. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada