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20120331 walking meditation and eight fold path
 

20120331 walking meditation and eight fold path

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Buddhism and Vipassana Meditation

Buddhism and Vipassana Meditation

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    20120331 walking meditation and eight fold path 20120331 walking meditation and eight fold path Presentation Transcript

    • Buddhist Association of Canada Cham Shan Temple Updated Mar 2010
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Cham Shan Templená mó fó tuó南 無 佛 陀 Namo Buddhaná mó dá mó南 無 達 摩 Namo Dharmaná mó sēng qié南 無 僧 伽 Namo Sangha Updated Mar 2010
    • Buddhist Association of Canada加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada7 Postures: 調身七支坐法 1. 足支:結跏趺坐 Full/half lotus/free seat 雙單散盤,足心向上 2. 腰脊支:脊直肩平 Spine and neck straight, back flat 背平頸 直 3. 手支:手結定印 Left palm below abdomen, right palm on the left palm, thumbs touching each other 姆指相挂 4. 肩胛支:頂門向上 shoulder upright and head top 頭正容寬 ,收斂下顎 Chin withdrawn 5. 头颈支: Head upright and neck straight 6. 舌支:舌抵上顎 Tongue on upper jaw 兩唇輕合 7. 目支:雙眼平視 , 半開半閉 , 視若無睹Eyes level and natural 開合自然, 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of CanadaAdjusting, Counting, Observing Breathing調息, 數息, 觀息 數息 – Counting from 1 to 10 and then repeat Mindful of Abdomen Breathing 觀腹式呼吸 – Tummy 丹田 Dantain 觀鼻端呼吸 – Focus in front of Nose 眼觀鼻 鼻觀心 – Eyes contemplate on nose Nose contemplates on mind 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of CanadaEssentials of InsightMeditation PracticeA Pragmatic Approach to Vipassana Meditation 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada The Main Aim of Buddhist MeditationThe main aim is to purify the mind of all negative tendencies—such as greed, anger and delusion, through mind control. When all negative tendencies are removed, the mind will be clear and freed from suffering.The actual aim is very exalted, as it aims at the complete eradication of suffering. This process does not only happen in or cover one existence, it spans over limitless existences. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Insight meditation Insight meditation does not just involve holding the mindstill. It also involves penetrative observation and absorption.This kind of penetrative observation, without any thinking,without any conceptualization, allows the mind to realize thetrue nature of things as they really are, things like the natureof our mind and body processes, the nature of the personand the nature of the world. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada The Results from Insight meditationWith the realization of the nature of existence:•The mind no longer has conflicts with the nature,•The mind becomes together with nature, and•The mind realizes the true nature of things.•Consequently, the mind becomes purified and absence ofdelusion. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Transcendence in Insight meditationIn the process, the mind transcends everything—1. It transcends conceptual reality,2. It transcends conditioned reality and finally3. It goes into absolute reality, which is the unchanging state.4. After much practice, it is the true nature that is experienced by the mind. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada The Nature of Mindfulness At the start of our practice, we have to recognize the nature of mindfulness, which we have to develop over time during meditation.The presence of mindfulness is what really makes thedifference between true happiness and false happiness.True happiness is when we really have peace of mind. Falsehappiness is when greed and excitement overcome the mind—the mind is agitated. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Three factors in mindfulness1. The 1st factor is clarity of the mind. The mind is clear and pure—clear from all greed, anger, dullness, delusion and hallucination.2. The 2nd factor is stability, calmness and peace. The mind is in the state of serenity, steadiness and non-violence even in an adverse condition.3. The third factor is alertness of the mind. The mind becomes sensitive and alert at meditation object and all the conditions and cause/effect associated with it. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada The Purpose of Meditation Practice1. To keep the mind in the present moment.2. To keep mindfulness clear, calm and in the present moment.3. To see what is happening to our meditation object.In walking meditation, the object of the mindfulness is the walkingprocess. In sitting meditation, the object is the ―rising‖ and―falling‖ process of the abdomen; and in other daily activities, the objectis to know what we are doing. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Brisk walkingBrisk walking is a walk that is faster than the normal walk. It can beextended to almost a run but not quite. It is just a fast walking withoutrunning.When you perform brisk walking, you keep your mind on the footstep.To keep your mind on the footstep, you may say mentally:―right, left, right, left…‖ or ―stepping left, stepping right…‖ 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Moderate walkingMost of the walking is done at a moderate pace. 1. First, when you stand, you must be aware of standing posture and bring you mindfulness down at the feet. 2. Take a deep breath, physically relax and be mindful on your feet. 3. Let our mind be clear, without any thinking. Just keep the mind calm, clear and mentally relaxed. 4. Keep your eyes downcast but not looking down during walking. 5. Your eyelids are half-closed when you are relaxed. 6. Only when you really want to look at something, do we look straight ahead. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Arousing Awareness on Standing When you are standing, you bring the awareness from the head tothe soles of our feet. You can say in our mind ―Standing, standing,…‖ at the same timebe aware of the body. The awareness should be clear, steady, calm and very alert andsensitive to the sensation of the body standing. When you bring your awareness onto the soles of the feet, you willfeel the sensation of the feet, i.e. weight, texture, moisture, coolnessor just clear awareness. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Arousing Awareness on Walking You need to focus your awareness on all the sensations.All five sensations are basic experiences before the other form ofthought processes begin, e.g. the idea of who and what your are,what is happening around you, is there anybody looking at me?When you start walking – right step, left step, saying in your minds―right step and left step‖ and focus on all your sensations.This will help you keep your minds on the object, otherwise you willstart thinking instead of truly sensing. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Slow Walking Your hands are folded in front of you. Right hand on top of lefthand with both thumbs touching each other.The pace of walking should be very slow and take steps which arehalf the normal distance.The feet should not be lifted too high, otherwise, you will not bestable.You should find the feet as if gliding parallel to the ground.When your body shifts forward, the hell automatically turns upslightly. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Random Thinking During WalkingTwo Types of Thinking:1. You know that you are thinking. Once you know that youare thinking, the thinking will go away. In this case, youdo not have to stop walking.2. You know that you are thinking but you are unable tostop thinking. In this case, you have to stop and say inyour mind ―thinking, thinking…‖ When you are awareof the thinking, it will go off.When the mind is no more mindful, it is as if the surfboard hasoverturned in the water and you have to bring yourselves back tobalance again. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Observation in Walking1. Arousing the awareness – relax and clear your mind2. Once your mindfulness is aroused – follow the object with awareness3. Get into the actual phase of insight meditation – observation.4. Follow a certain rhythm and pace of walking – like dancing.5. When you lift your hind foot, there is a feeling of a pulling force.6. When you foot starts lifting, you can feel the tension of lifting up – the sequence of processes of the sensations – happening from the calf to the sole, etc.. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Observation in WalkingYou begin to discover what is happening intrue feeling before the conceptualization takesplace. It is the true reality that is happeningwithin you all the time. You just need to bemindful on what you are doing consistently. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Satipatthana Vipassana Meditationn四念住 Kayanupassana Satipatthana (Mindfulness of Body) Vedananupassana Satipatthana (Mindfulness of Feelings) Cittanupassana Satipatthana (Mindfulness of Mind) Dhammanupassana Satipatthana (Mindfulness of Phenomena) 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Satipatthana Vipassana Meditationn四念住In the Buddhist tradition, satipatthāna refersto the establishing, foundation or presence of"mindfulness―. The Buddha taught theestablishing of mindfulness as the direct path tothe realization of nirvana. Satipatthānā meansthe Four Foundations of Mindfulness, bases formaintaining moment-by-moment mindfulnessand for developing mindfulness throughmeditation. In contemporary times the practiceis most associated with Theravada Buddhism( ). The method is also known asVipassana meditation. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada What is a Foundation of Mindfulness?Herein a monk dwells contemplatingthe body in the bodyfeelings in the feelingsconsciousness in the consciousnessmind-objects in the mind-objectsardent, clearly comprehending and mindfulhaving overcome covetousness and grief in theworld. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Cultivation of Foundation of MindfulnessHerein a monk dwells contemplating the fall ofthings in the body.He so dwells contemplating both the rise andfall of things in the body,ardent, clearly comprehending and mindfulhaving overcome covetousness and grief in theworld. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada BODY CONTEMPLATION AS FOUNDATION OF MINDFULNESS1 Breath2 Postures3 Clear comprehension4 Parts of the body impurities5 Four elements (earth, fire, water, and windelements)6-14 Decay 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada BODY CONTEMPLATION AS FOUNDATION OF MINDFULNESSIt is clear that some of them are initially puretranquility meditation exercises but are laterswitched to insight meditation in theclosing verse of Satipatthana Sutta—He lives contemplating origination thingsin the body, or he lives contemplatingdissolution-things in the body,or he lives contemplating origination anddissolution-things in the body. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada Questions and Comments 討論www.ChamShanTemple.orgwww.shengguangshi.blogspot.comShengguangShi@hotmail.comShengguang Shi 釋聖光Tom Cheung 張相棠Kam Cheung 張仁勤Dennis A. Yap 葉普智Rodolfo Rivas 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • Buddhist Association of Canada回向 yuàn xiāo zhàng zhū fán năo s ā nParinamana (Transfer of Merit) 願消三障諸煩惱 We wish to rid ourselves of the three hindrances and all klesas. yuàn dé zhì huì zhēn míng l ĭ a o 願得智慧 真 明了 We wish to gain wisdom and real understanding. pŭ yuàn zuì zhàng xī chú x i ā o 普願罪障悉消除 We wish all sinful hindrances to be totally eradicated. shì shì cháng xíng pú sà dào 世世常行菩薩道 In one life after another we always follow Bodhisattvas’ paths. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada