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20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
20120317 meditation and buddha teaching
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20120317 meditation and buddha teaching

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Buddhism, Meditation, five aggregates, vipasanna

Buddhism, Meditation, five aggregates, vipasanna

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  • Aristotle's common sense.
  • It is like the screen where all the other aggregates project
  • The receptacle-consciousness or alayavijñana as cause The receptacle-consciousness (alayavijñana)possesses the nature of cause, because it contains – or rather it is constituted by – all the vasanas(subliminal impressions) produced by any cognition or experience that affects the individual; and it is the vasanas that, on being reactivated, give rise to the conscious life of the individual. The alayavijñana is the cause of the activity of the function-consciousness ( pravrittivijñana).The transformation of the representations, etc., from subliminal into conscious (their passage from the alayavijñana to the pravrittivijñana), the arising of the ego-consciousness (manas) and the birth of one of the six types of cognition or consciousness (cakshur-vijñana or visual consciousness, etc.) are not successive processes; they are totally simultaneous, i.e., they take place at the same moment. Moreover, none of the different aspects of the mind (vasanas= subliminal elements, the vasanas transformed into conscious experiences, the ego) can exist without the others; they are mutually dependent.At a certain moment in the life of the individual, when adequate conditions occur, the vasanas are transformed from unconscious into conscious, and from the receptacle-consciousness of the mind (alayavijñana ) they become the function-consciousness ( pravrittivijñana) of the one and the same mind. They are constituted, as before, by a subject who is in front of an object and cognizes it, but now that subject has a full awareness of this confrontation, he knows in a complete and determinate way what the object of his knowledge is, and also has a full awareness of his own cognitive nature, that he is a subject, an ego which knows; now he is provided with the consciousness of himself, he possesses self-consciousness, manas. At the moment in which the transformation of the subliminal cognition into conscious cognition takes place, and in which the ego-consciousness, the self-consciousness is produced, the mind receives the name of manas, or its manas-aspect, its manas-function comes to being. The manas is, in other words, the self-consciousness, the ego-awareness. Of course this self, this ego, is not a real entity, but only an idea, only a perishable element of the equally perishable act of cognition.When all this accumulation of unrealities ceases to be, thanks to theBuddhist teachings, the empirical reality also vanishes and there remains only what truly always existed, exists and will exist: the Absolute, the third nature, the third way of being ( parinishpanna), defined as ‘the eternal non-existence as it appears of what appears’ (Vasubandhu,Trisvabhava3), the total absence of the dependent and the imaginary natures with their accompaniment of the unreal subject-object duality – in other terms the nirvana, the final aim of Buddhist efforts.
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    • 1. Buddhist Association of Canada Cham Shan Temple Updated Mar 2010
    • 2. Buddhist Association of Canada Cham Shan Templená mó fó tuó南 無 佛 陀 Namo Buddhaná mó dá mó南 無 達 摩 Namo Dharmaná mó sēng qié南 無 僧 伽 Namo Sangha Updated Mar 2010
    • 3. Buddhist Association of Canada References1. Basic Buddhist Textbook by Fang Lun in Chinese2. Cultivation and Contemplation by Master Zhize3. Six Dharma Gates by Master Zhize4. Essentials of Insight Meditation and Loving Kindness Medition by Ven. Sujiva 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 4. Buddhist Association of CanadaClass Arrangement 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 5. Buddhist Association of Canada加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 6. Buddhist Association of Canada加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 7. Buddhist Association of Canada加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 8. Buddhist Association of Canada加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 9. Buddhist Association of Canada加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 10. Buddhist Association of Canada加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 11. Buddhist Association of CanadaMeditation – 3 adjustments 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 12. Buddhist Association of Canada7 Postures: 調身七支坐法 1. 足支:結跏趺坐 Full/half lotus/free seat 雙單散盤,足心向上 2. 腰脊支:脊直肩平 Spine and neck straight, back flat 背平頸 直 3. 手支:手結定印 Left palm below abdomen, right palm on the left palm, thumbs touching each other 姆指相挂 4. 肩胛支:頂門向上 shoulder upright and head top 頭正容寬 ,收斂下顎 Chin withdrawn 5. 头颈支: Head upright and neck straight 6. 舌支:舌抵上顎 Tongue on upper jaw 兩唇輕合 7. 目支:雙眼平視 , 半開半閉 , 視若無睹Eyes level and natural 開合自然, 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 13. Buddhist Association of CanadaAdjust Breathing: 調息Your Best Friend - Watch Closely - Mindful of Your BreathingTake a long, gentle, even soft clean breath through your nose. Exhale through your month visualizing all the dirty, toxic obstructions are drained away along. Repeat three times.Prefer long, deep, soft and calm口吐濁氣。不可粗急。綿綿恣氣而出。想身分中百脈不通 處。放息隨氣而出。閉口鼻納清氣。如是至三。若身息 調和但一亦足。 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 14. Buddhist Association of CanadaAdjusting, Counting, Observing Breathing調息, 數息, 觀息 數息 – Counting from 1 to 10 and then repeat Mindful of Abdomen Breathing 觀腹式呼吸 – Tummy 丹田 Dantain 觀鼻端呼吸 – Focus in front of Nose 眼觀鼻 鼻觀心 – Eyes contemplate on nose Nose contemplates on mind 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 15. Buddhist Association of CanadaEssentials of InsightMeditation PracticeA Pragmatic Approach to Vipassana 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 16. Buddhist Association of Canada Satipatthana Vipassana Meditationn四念住 Kayanupassana Satipatthana (Mindfulness of Body) Vedananupassana Satipatthana (Mindfulness of Feelings) Cittanupassana Satipatthana (Mindfulness of Mind) Dhammanupassana Satipatthana (Mindfulness of Phenomena) 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 17. Buddhist Association of Canada Satipatthana Vipassana Meditationn四念住In the Buddhist tradition, satipatthāna refersto the establishing, foundation or presence of"mindfulness―. The Buddha taught theestablishing of mindfulness as the direct path tothe realization of nirvana. Satipatthānā meansthe Four Foundations of Mindfulness, bases formaintaining moment-by-moment mindfulnessand for developing mindfulness throughmeditation. In contemporary times the practiceis most associated with Theravada Buddhism( ). The method is also known asVipassana meditation. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 18. Buddhist Association of Canada What is a Foundation of Mindfulness?Herein a monk dwells contemplatingthe body in the bodyfeelings in the feelingsconsciousness in the consciousnessmind-objects in the mind-objectsardent, clearly comprehending and mindfulhaving overcome covetousness and grief in theworld. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 19. Buddhist Association of Canada Cultivation of Foundation of MindfulnessHerein a monk dwells contemplating the fall ofthings in the body.He so dwells contemplating both the rise andfall of things in the body,ardent, clearly comprehending and mindfulhaving overcome covetousness and grief in theworld. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 20. Buddhist Association of Canada BODY CONTEMPLATION AS FOUNDATION OF MINDFULNESS1 Breath2 Postures3 Clear comprehension4 Parts of the body impurities5 Four elements (earth, fire, water, and windelements)6-14 Decay 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 21. Buddhist Association of Canada BODY CONTEMPLATION AS FOUNDATION OF MINDFULNESSIt is clear that some of them are initially puretranquillity meditation exercises but are laterswitched to insight meditation in theclosing verse of Satipatthana Sutta—He lives contemplating origination thingsin the body, or he lives contemplatingdissolution-things in the body,or he lives contemplating origination anddissolution-things in the body. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 22. Buddhist Association of Canada佛教的教理 – Dharma, Teaching of Buddha 1. 三法印 3 Dharma Zeal 2. 四依法 4 Reliance 3. 十善 10 Good Deeds 4. 四聖諦 4 Noble Truth 5. 八正道 8 Fold Path 6. 十二因緣 12 Causation Link 7. 六度 6 Paramita 8. 八萬四千法門 84,000 Approaches 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 23. Buddhist Association of CanadaBuddhist Belief “Every existent is compounded by causes and conditions and is void of an independent self” THE TEACHINGS OF THE BUDDHA by Dharma Master Fa-Fang 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 24. Buddhist Association of Canada三法印 – 3 Zeal of the Dharma 諸行無常 諸法無我 湼槃寂靜 Impermanent No self Nirvana 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 25. Buddhist Association of CanadaFour Noble Truths 四諦十六行相 苦 滅 Suffering Cessation of the 果 苦, 無常, 空, 無我 cause of suffering Effect 滅, 靜, 妙, 離 集 道 Cause of suffering Eightfold Path to end 因 集, 因, 生, 緣 suffering Cause 道, 理, 行, 出 世間 出世間 Mundane Supra-mundane 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 26. Buddhist Association of CanadaDukkha 1 ordinary suffering (dukkha-dukkha) 2 dukkha as produced by change (veparinama- dukkha) 3 dukkha as conditioned states (samkhara- dukkha) 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 27. Buddhist Association of CanadaDukkha as conditioned states  Most important philosophical aspect of the First Noble Truth  The Buddha says : – In short these five aggregates of attachment are dukkha‟ – O bhikkhus, what is dukkha? It should be said that it is the five aggregates of attachment‟ 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 28. Buddhist Association of CanadaThe Five Aggregates 1. Form 2. Sensations 3. Perceptions 4. Mental Formations and Volition 5. Consciousness 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 29. Buddhist Association of Canada1. Matter-Rupakkhandha  Four elements: solidity, fluidity, heat and motion (earth, water, fire and air) and derivatives Derivatives: Faculties External Objects five material Eye visible form sense-organs Ear Sound Nose Odour Tongue Taste Body Tangible things Immaterial sense Mind Mind-objects: ideas or organ conceptions 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 30. Buddhist Association of CanadaMind faculty  „Mind‟ (manas) is not spirit as opposed to matter  Ideas and thoughts are not independent of the world experienced by these five physical sense faculties  Mind is only a faculty or organ (indriya) that can be controlled and developed like any other faculty 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 31. Buddhist Association of Canada2. Sensations-Vedanakkhandha Experienced through the contact of physical and mental organs with the external world, there are of six kinds and correspond to the faculties- objects  Pleasant  Unpleasant  Neutral All our physical and mental sensations are included in this group 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 32. Buddhist Association of Canada3. Perceptions-Sannakkhandha Like sensations, they are produced through the contact of our six faculties with the external world and are of six kinds Perception recognizes or labels the object Works by analogy 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 33. Buddhist Association of Canada4. Mental Formations and Volition- Samkharakkhandha  It may be described as a conditioned response to the object of experience.  Mental formations comes from the past (i.e. habits), and volition functions here and now.  Like sensations and perceptions, volition is of six kinds corresponding to the pairs faculty- object 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 34. Buddhist Association of Canada4. Mental Formations and Volition- Samkharakkhandha  Mental formations and volition determine our responses to the objects of experience and these responses have moral consequences  Volitional activities (karma) are of three kinds: body, speech and mind  There are 52 mental or volitional formations that produce Karma and they are the cause of becoming 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 35. Buddhist Association of Canada52 Mental FormationsContact Initial application Hate Shamelessness AmityFeeling Sustained application Dullness Recklessness ReasonPerception Effort Error Distraction FaithVolition Pleasurable interest Conceit Sloth MindfulnessConcentration ofmind Desire to do Envy Torpor ModestyPsychic life Deciding Selfishness Perplexity DiscretionAttention Greed Worry Disinterestedness Balance of mindComposure of mental properties Adaptability of mind Right speechComposure of mind Proficiency of mental properties Right actionBuoyancy of mental properties Proficiency of mind Right livelihoodBuoyancy of mind Rectitude of mental properties PityPliancy of mental properties Rectitude of mind AppreciationPliancy of mindAdaptability of mental properties 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 36. Buddhist Association of Canada5. Consciousness-Vinnanakkhandha  Awareness of the presence of an object  There is no recognition at this stage (perception)  In Buddhism there is no permanent, unchanging spirit which can be considered Self, or Soul, or Ego, as opposed to matter, and that consciousness should not be taken as spirit in opposition to matter 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 37. Buddhist Association of Canada5. Consciousness-Vinnanakkhandha  Arises out of conditions  Named according to whatever condition through which it arises (tactile, mind… 6 kinds)  Depends on matter, sensation, perception and mental formations  Seeking delight it may grow, increase and develop  Is a series, succession or current of vijñanas (conscious states), cognitive acts, representations, ideas, volitions, etc. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 38. Buddhist Association of CanadaYogacara - Mind Only school  All representations, cognitions, volitions, experiences leave a trace or subliminal impression –vasanas- in the subconscious part of the mind –alayavijñana- 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 39. Buddhist Association of CanadaYogacara - Mind Only school  These vasanas remain in the subconscious part of the mind (alayavijñana) in a latent, potential form until the moment when, due to adequate circumstances, they are reactivated, they become conscious passing to constitute the conscious part of the mind (pravrittivijñana)  All these contents of the mind are as unreal as the dreams which are also produced by the reactivation of vasanas. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 40. Buddhist Association of CanadaYogacara - Mind Only school  The vasanas give rise by means of that reactivation to actual, conscious representations, ideas, cognitions, volitions, experiences, etc., similar to those which left them, and which constitute the individual  Transmigration is explained – without having recourse to the notion of „soul‟ (atman) – through the theory of „series, succession, current of vijñanas‟ (conscious states) 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 41. Buddhist Association of CanadaYogacara - Mind Only school Function Consciousness Arising of the ego- (6 kinds) consciousness (Pravrittivijñana) (manas) 7 Vasanas Other Store Consciousness Skandhas subconscious - subliminal Conditions (Alayavijñana) 8 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 42. Buddhist Association of CanadaFive aggregates  The five aggregates are in flux of momentary arising and disappearing  One thing disappears, conditioning the appearance of the next in a series of cause and effect.  There is no unchanging substance in them.  There is nothing behind them that can be called a permanent Self (Atman) 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 43. Buddhist Association of CanadaNo Soul-Anatta  Mere suffering exists, but no sufferer is found; The deeds are, but no doer is found Buddhaghosa  There is no unmoving mover behind the movement  Thought itself is the thinker 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 44. Buddhist Association of CanadaReferences  http://www.buddhanet.net/funbud14.htm  Whalpola Rahula, What the Buddha Taught  Fernando Tola and Carmen Dragonetti, Philosophy of Mind in the Yogacara Buddhist School, History of Psychiatry 2005; 16; 453 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 45. Buddhist Association of Canada Questions and Comments 討論www.ChamShanTemple.orgwww.shengguangshi.blogspot.comShengguangShi@hotmail.comShengguang Shi 釋聖光Tom Cheung 張相棠Kam Cheung 張仁勤Dennis A. Yap 葉普智Rodolfo Rivas 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada
    • 46. Buddhist Association of Canada回向 yuàn xiāo zhàng zhū fán năo s ā nParinamana (Transfer of Merit) 願消三障諸煩惱 We wish to rid ourselves of the three hindrances and all klesas. yuàn dé zhì huì zhēn míng l ĭ a o 願得智慧 真 明了 We wish to gain wisdom and real understanding. pŭ yuàn zuì zhàng xī chú x i ā o 普願罪障悉消除 We wish all sinful hindrances to be totally eradicated. shì shì cháng xíng pú sà dào 世世常行菩薩道 In one life after another we always follow Bodhisattvas’ paths. 加拿大佛教會 © 2006 Buddhist Association of Canada

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