Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
The Shyam Bhatt Memorial Open Quiz 2012 - Finals - Part 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

The Shyam Bhatt Memorial Open Quiz 2012 - Finals - Part 1

1,697
views

Published on


0 Comments
6 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,697
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
243
Comments
0
Likes
6
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. The Shyam Bhatt Open Quiz The Finals
  • 2.  6 Rounds Round 1 – Topics, Written Round 2 – Dry, Infinite Bounce Round 3 – SVVC Round 4 – Dry, Infinite Bounce Round 5 – Theme, Written Round 6 – Differential Scoring, Written
  • 3.  Write Bros 10 questions 5 points per question Bonus of 10 for getting all 8 Topic – Famous photographs
  • 4.  "I asked her if shed like to have a back shot, just to be different" "She said, Yes, and began to clown around. You want it like this? she asked, posing. And I said, Yeah.‘ "I made only two shots of that pose. It was the second shot that became famous.“ Photographer Frank Polowny speaking about his masterpiece featuring the ideal legs according to hosiery specialists of the era [thigh (18.5") calf (12"), and ankle (7.5")]. Just identify the masterpiece.
  • 5.  “I intended this joke for my friends only, not for people who did not know me. I know who the person is [who betrayed him and sent the image on to a wider audience]. Ive had a discussion with them, and theres no hard feelings. I dont think this thing has to do with empathy or the lack of it. The people I intended it for all said they had a great laugh. Thats all”. This is Peter Guzli, a Hungarian from Budapest speaking about a photograph he took during a trip to New York in November 1997. How do we better known Peter Guzli?
  • 6.  This was the photographer’s personal favorite among all snaps the photographer ever took. Who was the photographer?
  • 7.  Audrey F. Tomason is one of only two women in the photograph. She is also the only person in the photograph under 40 years of age. Reports on her went like this – “Here were at least half a dozen people with similar profiles in the immediate vicinity where that photo was taken. The luck of the cameras gaze means that history will be able to place Tomason at a decisive moment in war on terrorism, but not her colleagues” Identify the snap. Who was the other woman in the snap?
  • 8.  "In 20-odd years of covering international cricket, this picture means the most to me. It was taken after what I think is the greatest Test match turnaround in history, when England defeated Australia at Headingley in July, 1981. The obvious image would have been an action picture of the swashbuckling X hitting fours and sixes to all parts of the ground. However, the quieter moment with him in the dressing room < blanked out > while reflecting on his momentous achievement is far more poignant. This is one of the reasons why it has been used extensively in books, magazines and newspapers“ This is cricket photographer Adrian Murrell speaking. What is he speaking about?
  • 9.  This act got him re-elected and was one of the reasons why he won the Nobel Peace Prize. Who? Where? Image in the next slide.
  • 10.  The scene was recreated 2 days after the actual event as a photographer was not available. However, the censors noticed that one of the featured guys had a wristwatch on each arm, indicating that he had been looting. The photo was therefore edited to removed the watches, and smoke in the background was darkened to make the picture more dramatic. The central character in the final image was a guy named Alyosha Kovalyov. What are we talking about?
  • 11.  Still from The Simpsons Episode 16 of Season 6, “Bart vs. Australia”. What is the still based on? Image in the next slide.
  • 12.  What specific event inspired the song being recited here?
  • 13.  The cropped portion is the one that all of us are familiar with. So, what has been cropped out?
  • 14. EXCHANGE
  • 15.  "I asked her if shed like to have a back shot, just to be different" "She said, Yes, and began to clown around. You want it like this? she asked, posing. And I said, Yeah.‘ "I made only two shots of that pose. It was the second shot that became famous.“ Photographer Frank Polowny speaking about his masterpiece featuring the ideal legs according to hosiery specialists of the era [thigh (18.5") calf (12"), and ankle (7.5")]. Just identify the masterpiece.
  • 16.  “I intended this joke for my friends only, not for people who did not know me. I know who the person is [who betrayed him and sent the image on to a wider audience]. Ive had a discussion with them, and theres no hard feelings. I dont think this thing has to do with empathy or the lack of it. The people I intended it for all said they had a great laugh. Thats all”. This is Peter Guzli, a Hungarian from Budapest speaking about a trip to NewYork in November 1997. How do we better known Peter Guzli?
  • 17.  This was the photographer’s personal favorite among all snaps the photographer ever took. Who was the photographer?
  • 18.  Audrey F. Tomason is one of only two women in the photograph. She is also the only person in the photograph under 40 years of age. Reports on her went like this – “Here were at least half a dozen people with similar profiles in the immediate vicinity where that photo was taken. The luck of the cameras gaze means that history will be able to place Tomason at a decisive moment in war on terrorism, but not her colleagues” Identify the snap. Who was the other woman in the snap?
  • 19.  "In 20-odd years of covering international cricket, this picture means the most to me. It was taken after what I think is the greatest Test match turnaround in history, when England defeated Australia at Headingley in July, 1981. The obvious image would have been an action picture of the swashbuckling X hitting fours and sixes to all parts of the ground. However, the quieter moment with him in the dressing room < blanked out > while reflecting on his momentous achievement is far more poignant. This is one of the reasons why it has been used extensively in books, magazines and newspapers“ This is cricket photographer Adrian Murrell speaking. What is he speaking about?
  • 20.  This act got him re-elected and was one of the reasons why he won the Nobel Peace Prize. Who? Where? Image in the next slide.
  • 21.  Willy Brandt The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising memorial
  • 22.  The scene was recreated 2 days after the actual event as a photographer was not available. However, the censors noticed that one of the featured guys had a wristwatch on each arm, indicating that he had been looting. The photo was therefore edited to removed the watches, and smoke in the background was darkened to make the picture more dramatic. The central character in the final image was a guy named Alyosha Kovalyov. What are we talking about?
  • 23.  Still from The Simpsons Episode 16 of Season 6, “Bart vs. Australia”. What is the still based on? Image in the next slide.
  • 24.  What specific event inspired the song being recited here?
  • 25.  The 1962 India-China War/ The Battle of Rezang La
  • 26.  The cropped portion is the one that all of us are familiar with. So, what has been cropped out?
  • 27.  Dry 18 questions 10 points each Infinite Bounce
  • 28.  A) The number 19790509, that supposedly referred to May 9, 1979 , the day a businessman named Habib Elghanian was executed by firing squad in Tehran. The execution was significant in Jewish history because it resulted in a mass exodus of Jews out of the Republic. B) ‘Myrtus’, a sly reference to Queen Esther, the Jewish queen, who, according to texts written in the 4th century B.C.E., saved Persian Jews from massacre. Esther’s Hebrew name was Hadassah, which refers to myrtle. Where would one find them together? What did it help ‘establish’?
  • 29.  Three manuscript versions were produced, handpainted in watercolour in the Japanese characters of katakana and hiragana and a third version in Arabic numerals. This third version developed into the International edition, first published in 1917 by the Kanahara Trading Company. Who hand-painted them/What are we talking about?
  • 30.  ‘The Scar’ is the third novel written by China Mieville. The book was nominated for a number of awards and won the 2003 British Fantasy Award. The book features a floating city named the Armada, which is comprised of thousands of ships. The flagship of the Armada is a ship known as The Morning Walker. Why did Mieville name the ship so?
  • 31.  This was one of the exhibits during a 2011 exhibition at the Knesset commemorating the golden jubilee of an event. Other items exhibited included keys to a house on Garibaldi Street in San Fernando, passports, photographs, license plates a few pairs of gloves etc. Why was the original purpose of this particular exhibit? Image in the next slide.
  • 32.  Between 1766 and 1769, this admiral- explorer became the first Frenchman to circumnavigate the earth, in what was the first such expedition in the world with professional naturalists and geographers aboard. These included Dr. Philibert Commercon, a noted French Botanist and Jeanne Bare, the first woman known to circumnavigate the globe. The expedition stopped over at Rio de Janeiro sometime in 1768, where Commercon did a lot of his work, most important among them being classification of a species of thorny, woody floweing ornamental vines growing up to 12 metres in height. Identify this French admiral in question.
  • 33.  Excerpt from a FinancialTimes article dated 8 Jan, 2012: “The Mei Moses has beaten the S&P 500 in six of the last 10 years, with an average annual return of 7.8 per cent compared with 2.7 per cent for the benchmark US index. The Mei Moses tracks the prices at which individual _______ ___ _____ sell over time using repeat sales data, in a methodology similar to the S&P Case-Shiller property index” The article quotes Michael Moses, creator of the index : “_____ prices are not correlated to sudden swings in stock markets but their prices tend to match changes in wealth creation and destruction. I’m not surprised by this growth as we are not seeing the wealth damage of 2008-09”. Either FITB or tell me what the Mei Moses Index analyses.
  • 34.  “There was a pause after the stock-brokers clerk had concluded his surprising experience. Then Sherlock Holmes cocked his eye at me, leaning back on the cushions with a pleased and yet critical face, like a connoisseur who has just taken his first sip of a _______ ________”. Excerpt from The Adventure of the Stockbroker’s Clerk. The blanked out part is a reference to something that has resulted in successful vintages. The 1811, 1826, 1839, 1845, 1852, 1858, 1861, 1985 & 1989 vintages have all been attributed to such an event with the 1811 event and the vintage being the most famous and sought after. The 1811 Chateau dYquem, even went on to receive a perfect 100-point wine rating by famous wine critic Robert Parker at a 1996 tasting over one hundred and eighty five years after it was bottled. Just FITB and identify the 1811 event.
  • 35. Winemakers have attributed successful vintages and ideal weather conditions to the appearance of comets
  • 36.  Captain Sir George Mansfield Smith-Cumming (1 April 1859 – 14 June 1923) was the first director of what would become the Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), also known as MI6. In this role he was particularly successful in building a post- imperial British intelligence service. One of the discoveries by SIS prompted him to say , "Every man (is) his own stylo/stylus" , which was later adopted by the SIS agents as an unofficial motto . What was this discovery ?
  • 37. • The powerful 20-beam infrared neodymium glass laser built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 1977 for the study of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and long-scale- length laser-plasma interactions takes its name from a mythological character X due to the lasers multi-beamed structure. It was the world’s most powerful laser system of its time and could compress fusion fuel to about the density of lead. This laser system in turn was the inspiration for a similar device (and its name) in a cult movie Y. The movie is the only one to feature the Lawrence Livermore lab as a shooting location.• X andY please.• Image in the next slide.
  • 38.  X and Indira Gandhi were close friends and met for the first time during the Jawaharlal Nehru Lecture in Delhi in 1969. During an interview with noted Pakistani author Anwar Dil, X spoke thus about X’s poetry skills and friendship with Indira : “I don’t know, I don’t call it poetry. And if you say I’m a poet, that’s all right, but I can’t say that I’m a poet. I am not inspired by myself. I can’t write a poem to myself. I have thoughts, some of which are worth communicating to others. In 1981, I wrote Cosmic Plurality, with illustration. I gave it to my friend Indira Gandhi” Who is X? Picture of the illustration presented to Indira Gandhi on the next slide.
  • 39.  One of the larger members of its ilk,this 2.99 meters high by 3.62 meters long ‘object’ required no less than an Airbus Beluga (as it would not fit inside a usual 747 cargo plane) to transport it from its original location in Paris to Tokyo for an exhibition marking the France-Japan year in 1998-99. It had to be transported in a vertical position inside a special pressurized container provided with isothermal protection and an antivibration device. To mark the event and associate itself with France-Japan Year, Airbus Industrie even reproduced the ‘object’ on the flanks of the Beluga. Just identify the ‘object’ that was transported. Image in the next slide.
  • 40.  A lookout in Nyeri, Kenya for the Kings African Rifles was burned down by the African guerillas during the Mau Mau rebellion in 1954. It was built in 1932 by Major Eric Sherbrooke Walker, for his wife (who liked such structures) as an adjunct facility to the Outspan Hotel. The developments at this location on the night of Feb 5-6, 1952, after a state dinner hosted by Chief Justice Horace Hearne, prompted the gentleman pictured to say something. What? Image in the next slide.
  • 41. “For the first time in the history of the world, a young girlclimbed into a tree one day a Princess and after having whatshe described as her most thrilling experience she climbeddown from the tree next day a Queen — God bless her” - Jim Corbett
  • 42.  Excerpt from the 1886 book pictured: “In calling me by the strange name of ‘________ ,’ I wonder if my dear departed parents received a glimpse of the future life of their child in a camera, speaking to them of her life of loneliness," mused _________, "for truly I am alone...” FITB. Why would this book go on to become famous, indirectly, approximately 6 decades later? Image in the next slide.
  • 43.  The New York City Mayor James J. Walker likened a 1926 event featuring a NYC-ian to Moses parting the Red Sea, Caesar crossing the Rubicon and Washington crossing the Delaware. The person who involved was a 3-time Olympic medallist, winning a Gold and 2 Bronze Medals at the 1924 Olympics. Who and what?
  • 44.  The Council of the EU has a rotary presidency system, whereby the governments of member countries exchange leadership every 6 months. It is customary for the presiding country to place an exhibit in the Justus Lipsius building in Brussels (where the CEU is HQed). Pictured is controversial Czech sculptor David Cerny’s ‘Entropa’ unveiled in Jan 2009 to mark the occasion of Czech Republic’s presidency of the CEU. It is an unassembled model kit containing pieces in the shapes of the 27 member states of the EU with a distinctive theme for each state. a. Which state does the empty panel on the top left stand for? b. Close-up of another panel is also shown. Which nation does it represent and what are those 3 little pieces?
  • 45. a. UK – Because of its Euroscepticism and relative isolation from the European mainland.b. Portugal and its former colonies – Brazil, Angola and Mozambique.
  • 46. Why did this gesture land him in trouble?
  • 47.  Paul Gascoigne celebrating by imitating a flute for Rangers against Celtic in 1998. The flute is a protestant symbol, which did not sit well the the Catholic Celtic fans. The flute represented the Protestant Orange Institution in Scotland and Ireland and Catholics were strictly banned from becoming members. The flute was also a loyalist symbol, bringing the IRA (Celtic are pro-IRA) and their death threats into picture.
  • 48.  Connect.
  • 49.  Chico – Because he was a "Chicken-chaser" (woman-chaser). Harpo – He played the harp in most of his films. Zeppo – Most widely accepted theory being that it was derived from the Zeppelin (as said by Groucho). Gummo – He wore gum-soled shoes, which meant no-one could hear him sneaking into a room. Groucho – Groucho himself insisted that he was named for the character Groucho the Monk in the comic strip Knocko the Monk.
  • 50.  Steve Dorner, after working on a new email program for a year, was finally ready to release it for free to the Internet community in 1988. The working name was UIUCMail, which Dorner realized was a tongue twister. Then he remembered a short story written by X. The story features a woman who decides to live at the post office where she works rather than put up with her family at home any longer. Dorner was processing so much email at the time that he felt like he lived at the post office, and his program used a "post office" protocol to fetch mail. He saw a metaphorical connection and named the program after the author. What did he name the program?
  • 51.  Short Video-Visual connect 6 questions Answers to be written down 5 points for individual answers +25/+20/+15 for 1-2/3-4/5-6 Uniform negative of -5 throughout for getting the connect wrong
  • 52.  Usually a couples dance which is traditionally accompanied by guitars and/or hand-clapping, it is very popular in Spain, Portugal and their colonies. The name of the dance is used as a synonym for a fight due to its extravagant features. Featured is a famous Portuguese variant practised in Ribatejo, Portugal. Just identify.
  • 53. EXCHANGE
  • 54.  Usually a couples dance which is traditionally accompanied by guitars and/or hand-clapping, it is very popular in Spain, Portugal and their colonies. The name of the dance is used as a synonym for a fight due to its extravagant features. Featured is a famous Portuguese variant practised in Ribatejo, Portugal. Just identify.