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The QFI General Open Quiz at IIT Madras - The Finals

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Questions from the General Open Quiz organized by QFI Chennai and The IIT Madras Quiz Club at IIT Madras on 25 Jan 2014.

Questions from the General Open Quiz organized by QFI Chennai and The IIT Madras Quiz Club at IIT Madras on 25 Jan 2014.

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  • 1. Researched and conducted by: Major Chandrakant Nair
  • 2. The Quiz Foundation of India The IIT Madras Quiz Club Hari Parameswaran Krishna Akhil Navin Rajaram
  • 3.  4 Rounds  Round 1 – Written (8 questions) Round 2 – Dry, Clockwise (17 questions) Round 3 – Written (8 questions) Round 4 – Dry, Anticlockwise (17 questions)  50 questions in total
  • 4.  Write Bros  Topic – Medicine, or What they don’t teach you in medical school part II  8 questions  10 points for very correct answer  Bonus of 10 points for getting all 8
  • 5.  Dr C Sathyanarayana was a famous ENT specialist and the founder director of Institute of Otorhinolaryngology at Madras Medical College. A personal physician to many VVIPs including former Chief minister of Madras C Rajagopalachari, he was even invited to the White House by JFK. However, his most important surgery, according to his colleagues, was a simple incision that removed a foreign body (that had eroded to the surface) from a patient who had come for follow-up. Initial attempts to extract the object from the patient’s throat had failed during in-patient treatment at Government Royapettah Hospital in 1967.  What exactly was this foreign body?
  • 6.  Jacqueline ________ was famous in the 80s as a promoter of Women’s Wrestling, and in the mid-90s as an astrologer who set up a psychic hotline. She also invented the technique of rumpology, where people’s fortunes are foretold by examining pictures of their rear ends. In 1946, the birth of her first son met with complications that forced her obstetricians to use two pairs of forceps during the delivery. The misuse of these accidentally severed the baby’s facial nerve and caused paralysis on one side of the face.  Who was the kid? Image follows.
  • 7.  In 1890, 2 doctors named Edward Spitzka and Carlos MacDonald were tasked to oversee a procedure, the first ever of its kind, which lasted 17 seconds. However, it was ineffective the first time and they had to re-do it, bringing the total duration to 8 min, causing the capillaries under the skin to rupture in the process. The procedure involved the depolarization/scrambling of electrical signals produced by the brain, leading to cardiac arrhythmias, muscle tetany, coagulative necrosis of tissue and multiple mechanical injuries.  What are we talking about? Also, identify the person on whom the procedure was performed.
  • 8.  She was born in 1893 and stayed in Cushing, Maine, in an old house on a promontory jutting out into the Atlantic Ocean. She suffered from a degenerative muscular condition and had trouble walking as early as three, but refused to be examined. So, the nature of her illness is not clear, but is thought to be Polio. The description of her symptoms is also suggestive of Charcot-MarieTooth Disease or Friedreich's Ataxia or even a mild form of cerebral palsy. As she got older, her disability progressed and she began to fall often. At 26, she couldn't walk more than three steps without assistance. At 53, she was no longer able to stand and had stopped attempting to walk, but still eschewed a wheelchair.  Who?
  • 9.  First reported in 1999, Culex pipiens f. molestus is a species of mosquito unique to a subterranean location, having adapted its biology to survive and thrive within this harsh environment. The puddles here are rich in nutrients derived from discarded sandwiches and human skin cells. By laying eggs in this water, a healthy progeny in ensured and such is the power of this water that the mothers don’t need a nutrient-rich blood meal before laying their eggs. The species has been around since the 1860s during the construction of the location and was notable for its assault of sheltered locals during WW II.  What is the common name of this species? Image follows.
  • 10.  NGC 4567 and NGC 4568 are two spiral galaxies discovered by William Herschel in 1784 and located 60 million light-years away in the constellation Virgo. The two systems are in a constant process of collision and merger, giving the appearance of being linked to each other.  What nickname have they been given as a result?  Image follows.
  • 11.  A Calcaneal Spur is a growth on the bottom of the heel bone as a result of calcium deposits caused by constant stress. X suffered from these spurs in both feet towards the end of his career in the late 40s and early 50s, and had to undergo surgery for the same. But, he braved the pain and made a great come-back, winning 3 World Series titles from 1949-51, the last 3 years of his career. This triumph of X against his medical ailments found him a spot in a 1952 work of fiction as an idol and symbol of perseverance for its protagonist who was trapped in a similar struggle.  Who is X? Which work of fiction? Image follows.
  • 12.  The medial plantar nerve is the larger of the two terminal divisions of the tibial nerve. It is the primary nerve innervating the great toe and the second toe, and is believed to connect to the uterus and the heart. Stimulation of the nerve is believed to have a positive effect in the regulation of the blood flow to the uterus and its consequent strengthening.  What practice did this belief give rise to?
  • 13.  Dr C Sathyanarayana was a famous ENT specialist and the founder director of Institute of Otorhinolaryngology at Madras Medical College. A personal physician to many VVIPs including former Chief minister of Madras C Rajagopalachari, he was even invited to the White House by JFK. However, his most important surgery, according to his colleagues, was a simple incision that removed a foreign body (that had eroded to the surface) from a patient who had come for follow-up. Initial attempts to extract the object from the patient’s throat had failed during in-patient treatment at Government Royapettah Hospital in 1967.  What exactly was this foreign body?
  • 14.  Jacqueline ________ was famous in the 80s as a promoter of Women’s Wrestling, and in the mid-90s as an astrologer who set up a psychic hotline. She also invented the technique of rumpology, where people’s fortunes are foretold by examining pictures of their rear ends. In 1946, the birth of her first son met with complications that forced her obstetricians to use two pairs of forceps during the delivery. The misuse of these accidentally severed the baby’s facial nerve and caused paralysis on one side of the face.  Who was the kid? Image follows.
  • 15.  In 1890, 2 doctors named Edward Spitzka and Carlos MacDonald were tasked to oversee a procedure, the first ever of its kind, which lasted 17 seconds. However, it was ineffective the first time and they had to re-do it, bringing the total duration to 8 min, causing the capillaries under the skin to rupture in the process. The procedure involved the depolarization/scrambling of electrical signals produced by the brain, leading to cardiac arrhythmias, muscle tetany, coagulative necrosis of tissue and multiple mechanical injuries.  What are we talking about? Also, identify the person on whom the procedure was performed.
  • 16.  She was born in 1893 and stayed in Cushing, Maine, in an old house on a promontory jutting out into the Atlantic Ocean. She suffered from a degenerative muscular condition and had trouble walking as early as three, but refused to be examined. So, the nature of her illness is not clear, but is thought to be Polio. The description of her symptoms is also suggestive of Charcot-MarieTooth Disease or Friedreich's Ataxia or even a mild form of cerebral palsy. As she got older, her disability progressed and she began to fall often. At 26, she couldn't walk more than three steps without assistance. At 53, she was no longer able to stand and had stopped attempting to walk, but still eschewed a wheelchair.  Who?
  • 17.  First reported in 1999, Culex pipiens f. molestus is a species of mosquito unique to a subterranean location, having adapted its biology to survive and thrive within this harsh environment. The puddles here are rich in nutrients derived from discarded sandwiches and human skin cells. By laying eggs in this water, a healthy progeny in ensured and such is the power of this water that the mothers don’t need a nutrient-rich blood meal before laying their eggs. The species has been around since the 1860s during the construction of the location and was notable for its assault of sheltered locals during WW II.  What is the common name of this species? Image follows.
  • 18.  NGC 4567 and NGC 4568 are two spiral galaxies discovered by William Herschel in 1784 and located 60 million light-years away in the constellation Virgo. The two systems are in a constant process of collision and merger, giving the appearance of being linked to each other.  What nickname have they been given as a result?  Image follows.
  • 19.  A Calcaneal Spur is a growth on the bottom of the heel bone as a result of calcium deposits caused by constant stress. X suffered from these spurs in both feet towards the end of his career in the late 40s and early 50s, and had to undergo surgery for the same. But, he braved the pain and made a great come-back, winning 3 World Series titles from 1949-51, the last 3 years of his career. This triumph of X against his medical ailments found him a spot in a 1952 work of fiction as an idol and symbol of perseverance for its protagonist who was trapped in a similar struggle.  Who is X? Which work of fiction? Image follows.
  • 20.  The medial plantar nerve is the larger of the two terminal divisions of the tibial nerve. It is the primary nerve innervating the great toe and the second toe, and is believed to connect to the uterus and the heart. Stimulation of the nerve is believed to have a positive effect in the regulation of the blood flow to the uterus and its consequent strengthening.  What practice did this belief give rise to?
  • 21.  These guns exhibited in Sydney and Canberra are trophies from the Battle of Cocos that happened in the Pacific Ocean theatre during WW II. They were captured by HMAS Sydney, a Chatham class light cruiser of the Royal Australian Navy, and are her most famous conquests.  What was the source of these guns?  Images follow.
  • 22.  Dry Round  Clockwise  17 questions  Infinite Pounce - +10, -5  Infinite Bounce - +10
  • 23.  Pakistan has one of the lowest rates of income tax collection in the world, with only about a million Pakistanis paying their share, out of 170 million. So, in 2010, in a bid for a solution and some publicity, the Pakistani authorities borrowed a creative idea that had alleviated tax collection woes in the state of Bihar in neighboring India. The program was a big success, the defaulters preferring to pay up and not get embarrassed. It brought in $100,000 in the first year alone, 10 times the cost of investment.  What was this innovative idea?
  • 24.  Desre Buirski is a fashion designer who started her career abroad in the US in the 80s. Most of her designs are based on Indonesian wax-dyeing techniques. After returning to her homeland in the 90s, she gave away a creation from her US days, a loose, silk, hand-painted dress in black (size XL) with a marine theme, to a security officer. The dress made news less than 2 weeks later and she went on to make more than 150 of these items in the next two decades.  What exactly were these items? Image follows.
  • 25.  These are the definitions of 3 terms as conveyed to a group of students, the last one conveyed to a specific person in the group. X: A figure of speech based on association. Here, we give the instance of a more comprehensive term used for a less comprehensive one and vice-versa. Y: Not explained. Z: A figure of speech which consists in stating a disagreeable fact in an agreeable manner.  Who was it conveyed to? Also, solve for X and Z.
  • 26. Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fl8wof3xs0k
  • 27.  In Japan, it is traditional to share one’s good luck by sending gifts and throwing parties when one gets fortunate. This expensive proposition has resulted in a certain group of people purchasing insurance at $65/year for coverage of up to $3,500 in the event that they get really lucky. First established by Kyoei Mutual Fire and Marine Insurance Co. in 1982 and now offered by 30 odd firms, the market is valued at $220 million per year with nearly 4 million customers. In most other countries, by contrast, it is the person with the stroke of luck who is rewarded.  Which group of people? Which specific act of luck, estimated to happen once in 10,700 times?
  • 28.  This Bengali-style Chhatri, aptly named Smith’s Folly, was installed in its current location in Delhi in 1848 by Lord Hardinge after he realized that its original location was out of place and ridiculous.  What was the original location? Why was it out of place?
  • 29.  Evolution of a record that involves traversing 3 major landmarks (Room 16 of Sully Wing, Daru staircase, Salle des Etats) is given below. The attempts are said to yield best results at 9 am. 1. Jimmy Johnson from San Francisco  9 min 45 seconds 2. Odile, Franz and Arthur (1964)  9 min 43 seconds 3. Matthew, Theo and Isabelle (2003)  9 min 28 seconds  What are we talking about? Who are the people mentioned in 2 and 3?
  • 30.  Arsene Wenger, working as a French TV pundit during Euro 2012, asked the commentators to stop talking so that viewers could hear the fans of a team singing in spite of trailing 4-0. Most channels around the world did the same thing, and this moment was regarded as the saving grace for a tournament troubled by racism and violence. The song, ‘The Fields of Athenry’, is the most popular anthem for sports teams from the nation involved and tells the story of a man named Michael who is punished for stealing for his family.  Which team? What is the core subject of the song?  Video removed. Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdZqpYX9eNk 
  • 31.  Introduced in the late 19th century with a specific role, it was one of the first trains to have vestibuled carriages. The original route was from Chennai to Tuticorin, but was extended to Dhanushkodi after the Pamban Bridge came up in 1914. Damages from the 1964 cyclone saw the route cut short to Rameswaram. It runs even today, albeit in a diminished role, as the 16701/16702 service between Chennai Egmore and Rameswaram. The train gets its name from the events that used to unfold after the passengers travelling from Chennai got down at the last stop.  What exactly happened after the train reached the destination? What is the name of the train?
  • 32.  An important sub-category of pen nibs are the ones which have a three tine design (variants with two tines also exist). The three tines provide increased ink flow to the wide tip, allowing for hasty writing, amongst other things. When used in the intended way, these are to be held almost vertical to the paper, and twisted such that the flat sides of the nib are perpendicular to the ruling. The net result when writing is that it gives a thick left/right stroke, and a very thin up/down stroke.  Where are these nibs used? OR What are they called? Images follow.
  • 33.  This term, derived from the name of this building in Venice (which in turn is named after an Arabic term recognizing its function), originally referred to a gold coin that had an unchanged design from the 13th to 18th centuries. It later came to refer to certain multifunctional objects that served as a status symbol, theft deterrent or a spiritual guide. Over the last century, electroplated gelatin, acetate, Mylar and vinyl plastic have all been used to make these objects.  What are these objects? What discovery made them a rage the world over in the early 1920s? Image follows.
  • 34.  In 1970, Swedish architect Sune Lindstrom was asked to design a modern supply system for a necessary commodity. To achieve this, his company VBB built a total of 31 structures in 5 groups, all in mushroom shape. However, the commissioning agency wanted the 6th group to be more spectacular. So, they were constructed in a different design, symbolic of the ideals of humanity (earth) and technology (rocket). Their appearance was enhanced using 55,000 chinese steel discs in 8 shades of blue, green and gray, arranged in spiral patterns.  What are these structures?
  • 35.  The allied forces entered mainland Italy on Sep 3, 1943, following Operation Avalanche. They established bases in Italy the same year, readying to take on Germany in their own backyard. A major unit involved was the 340th Bombardment Group who had their base at Terzigno near Naples. During this phase, they suffered the loss of more aircraft than any other medium group during WW II because of two events. One was a surprise German raid in May 1944 that destroyed 60 aircraft.  What was the other event, that resulted in the loss of around 90 aircraft?
  • 36.  The Americans rubbished his first victory, saying two of their stars Eddie Hart and Reynaud Robinson were disqualified. His reply silenced the media: “I beat the men who were there.”  Still, the Americans did not concede defeat and swore they would beat him in the next event. 48 hours later, he was back on the track, with Larry Black, Larry Burton and Chuck Smith, all keen on revenge. Continuing with his excellent form, he beat everyone to the gold medal in 20.00 seconds.  It was only 5 years later, in 1977, that the Americans came to terms with this and honored his achievements in a singular way. Who? How?
  • 37.  This rotating group of officials held office from Good Friday 1661 to Good Friday 1662. They were five in number, assisted by a servant. Technically, they were textile retailers who were elected to assess the quality of cloth that weavers offered to members of their society. They conducted inspections thrice weekly, and carried steel pliers to press seals into specially affixed lead slugs to record the results. The highest grade of cloth was indicated by pressing four seals and the lowest by pressing only one.  Who are these people, believed to be giving an account of the year's business to an assembly? Clue available if no-one objects.
  • 38.  The National Statuary Hall Collection in the US Capitol comprises of statues donated by individual states to honor important persons in their history. The only statue of a child in the collection was installed by Alabama in Oct 2009. Designed by famous sculptor Edward Hlavka, it shows a seven-year-old girl wearing a pinafore over her dress. She is portrayed as standing at an ivyentwined water pump with her right hand on the pump handle and her left beneath the spout to feel the flow of the water.  What is represented by this sculpture? Image follows.
  • 39.  Chopard is a Swiss luxury-watch company. In 1997, the creative skills of Caroline Scheufele, the firm’s co-President, impressed someone so much that Chopard was tasked with the manufacture and supply of a particular item. This item is today made in the company HQ in Geneva by one of their master craftsmen. It features a crystal perfectly beveled along the edges in the shape of an emerald-cut diamond, on which is mounted something that appears as if its parts have been caught in midmotion. The finished product is then packed neatly in a case of blue morocco leather.  What are we talking about? Images follow.
  • 40.  Teju Cole is a Nigerian-American writer who’s authored two highly acclaimed books, Every Day is for the Thief and Open City, the works having won multiple international awards. On Jan 8, 2014, he came out a new short story about a man having a heart attack in public. This work with 33 parts was composed in a very unique manner, and utilized the services of more than a dozen unrelated people. The whole project was an experiment to test the social nature of the platform it employed.  How was the work written?
  • 41.  After X’s death in 1827, it was decided that a memorial be built honoring his contributions like the introduction of the Ryotwari System and a proper education policy in the region under his governance. Sculpted using the statue of George IV at Trafalgar Square as a model, it cost £8000 and was erected in 1839. However, the memorial had a peculiarity: it missed ‘something’. While it is believed to be an oversight on the part of the sculptor, another theory attributes this to X’s specific habit during the recreation depicted in the memorial.  What is missing? OR What is this memorial popularly known as? Image follows.
  • 42.  Written Round  8 questions  10 points for every correct answer  Bonus of 10 for getting all correct  Topic – Syzygy
  • 43.  When two words have two or more letters standing together in the same order, common to both.  Invented by Lewis Carroll, no less.
  • 44. Liverpool Herpes Torpedo Pediatrics Satriani Mariana Manatee Manchester
  • 45. Tagore 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Mandela
  • 46.  In The Wizard of Oz, the Scarecrow is one of the characters who join Dorothy in her quest. He asks the wizard for a brain, but the wizard gives him a diploma instead.  By virtue of his newly-attained intelligence, the Scarecrow tries to recite something postulated by a philosopher in the 6th century B.C., but gets it slightly wrong.  What does he recite?
  • 47.  To celebrate their 10th anniversary in 2013, the producers of a famous TV show aired a few special commercials. A parody of this song was used as the background in these ads.  Just identify the TV show.  Audio removed.  Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m9We2XsVZfc
  • 48.  A member of the Musaceae family, it specifically is a clone of the Cavendish variety. The cultivar is named after William Cavendish, 6th Duke of Devonshire, who acquired an early specimen, and from whose hothouses the first ones were developed for commercial exploitation worldwide. Extremely common and popular in India, it differs from other common varieties in that the outer skin is green in colour. A 'keystone species' in many ecosystems, it establish themselves rapidly in disturbed regions, like areas subjected to forest fires.  What ‘strong’ variety are we talking about?
  • 49.  This image of a group of monkeys appeared in 1886 in a German journal named Berichte der Durstigen Chemischen Gesellschaft. It parodied an anecdote that was famous through oral transmission but had not yet appeared in print. The anecdote itself has its origins in the harsh winter of 1861-62 that caused someone to doze off in front of a fire in Ghent, Belgium.  What anecdote?
  • 50.  In 1995, 461 big convex discs (2.3m wide) and 954 small concave discs (1.4m wide) were made for a project designed by French architect Roger Anger. These stainless steel discs, weighing 210 kg each, were coated with leaves of gilding protected between 2 thin layers of glass. This offered durability, good maintenance and easy replacement if damaged. They were then mounted on to the final framework using steel rods. The final arrangement reflected sunlight, but also allowed it to permeate through the 800 odd translucent gaps on the framework.  In which town would one be able to see these discs? Images follow.
  • 51.  It is speculated that this lady borrowed the name X from John Milton’s Paradise Lost. Milton frequently refers to God as ‘the X’ in Paradise Lost, and the lady attempted to portray her creation X as playing God by creating life. X’s adventures happened at Ingolstadt, which also witnessed the creation of a body Y on on May 1, 1776, thanks to a German philosopher named Adam Weishaupt.  Solve for X and Y.
  • 52.  Considered as one of the world’s most invasive species, they have a circumboreal range throughout North America and Eurasia. They adopt a completely white fur coat (except the black tail-tip) during the winter, and is a traditional symbol of purity because it was believed they would face death rather than soil the white coat. This probably influenced its inclusion in a 1490 painting, one of only 4 portraits by the painter to feature a woman.  Which work?
  • 53.  The only land-based ICBM currently in service with the US has a very quick reaction time and can be launched immediately after the receipt of a valid launch order. They can carry up to 3 nuclear warheads and will be in service until at least 2030. The missile is named after elite militia of the American Revolutionary War who were always ready to turn out rapidly for emergencies at very short notice.  What name?
  • 54.  In The Wizard of Oz, the Scarecrow is one of the characters who join Dorothy in her quest. He asks the wizard for a brain, but the wizard gives him a diploma instead.  By virtue of his newly-attained intelligence, the Scarecrow tries to recite something postulated by a philosopher in the 6th century B.C., but gets it slightly wrong.  What does he recite?
  • 55. Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jbvip1Ot6jQ
  • 56. Tagore Pythagoras 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Mandela
  • 57.  To celebrate their 10th anniversary in 2013, the producers of a famous TV show aired a few special commercials. A parody of this song was used as the background in these ads.  Just identify the TV show.  Audio removed.  Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m9We2XsVZfc
  • 58. Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZR-N_fMpBXo
  • 59. Tagore Pythagoras Mythbusters 3 4 5 6 7 8 Mandela
  • 60.  A member of the Musaceae family, it specifically is a clone of the Cavendish variety. The cultivar is named after William Cavendish, 6th Duke of Devonshire, who acquired an early specimen, and from whose hothouses the first ones were developed for commercial exploitation worldwide. Extremely common and popular in India, it differs from other common varieties in that the outer skin is green in colour. A 'keystone species' in many ecosystems, it establish themselves rapidly in disturbed regions, like areas subjected to forest fires.  What ‘strong’ variety are we talking about?
  • 61. Tagore Pythagoras Mythbusters Robusta 4 5 6 7 8 Mandela
  • 62.  This image of a group of monkeys appeared in 1886 in a German journal named Berichte der Durstigen Chemischen Gesellschaft. It parodied an anecdote that was famous through oral transmission but had not yet appeared in print. The anecdote itself has its origins in the harsh winter of 1861-62 that caused someone to doze off in front of a fire in Ghent, Belgium.  What anecdote?
  • 63. Tagore Pythagoras Mythbusters Robusta Ouroboros 5 6 7 8 Mandela
  • 64.  In 1995, 461 big convex discs (2.3m wide) and 954 small concave discs (1.4m wide) were made for a project designed by French architect Roger Anger. These stainless steel discs, weighing 210 kg each, were coated with leaves of gilding protected between 2 thin layers of glass. This offered durability, good maintenance and easy replacement if damaged. They were then mounted on to the final framework using steel rods. The final arrangement reflected sunlight, but also allowed it to permeate through the 800 odd translucent gaps on the framework.  In which town would one be able to see these discs? Images follow.
  • 65. Tagore Pythagoras Mythbusters Robusta Ouroboros Auroville 6 7 8 Mandela
  • 66.  It is speculated that this lady borrowed the name X from John Milton’s Paradise Lost. Milton frequently refers to God as ‘the X’ in the work, and the lady attempted to portray her creation X as playing God by trying to create life. X’s adventures happened at Ingolstadt, which also witnessed the creation of a body Y on on May 1, 1776, thanks to a German philosopher named Adam Weishaupt.  Solve for X and Y.
  • 67. Tagore Pythagoras Mythbusters Robusta Ouroboros Auroville Illuminati 7 8 Mandela
  • 68.  Considered as one of the world’s most invasive species, they have a circumboreal range throughout North America and Eurasia. They adopt a completely white fur coat (except the black tail-tip) during the winter, and is a traditional symbol of purity because it was believed they would face death rather than soil the white coat. This probably influenced its inclusion in a 1490 painting, one of only 4 portraits by the painter to feature a woman.  Which work?
  • 69. Tagore Pythagoras Mythbusters Robusta Ouroboros Auroville Illuminati Ermine 8 Mandela
  • 70.  The only land-based ICBM currently in service with the US has a very quick reaction time and can be launched immediately after the receipt of a valid launch order. They can carry up to 3 nuclear warheads and will be in service until at least 2030. The missile is named after elite militia of the American Revolutionary War who were always ready to turn out rapidly for emergencies at very short notice.  What name?
  • 71. Tagore Pythagoras Mythbusters Robusta Ouroboros Auroville Illuminati Ermine Minuteman Mandela
  • 72.  They are of two kinds - old, traditional ones which operate as ‘monthlies’, and the ‘daily-basis’ ones. The software boom of the 90s contributed to their growth, most of them set up by poor farmers of south Tamil Nadu who had to migrate to Chennai due to the declining state of agriculture. Periyar, Anna, Bharathiraja, Kannadasan, Raghuvaran etc. have all utilized their services. They have also inspired many Tamil novels, short stories, and even film songs.  What are these 250 odd entities, concentrated in a place that means ‘Sacred Lily Pond’?
  • 73.  Dry Round  Clockwise  17 questions  Infinite Pounce - +10, -5  Infinite Bounce - +10
  • 74.   8 of them have been used so far, on 8 different occasions, usually in February. The first time it happened was on July 27, 1996, while the latest was on Feb 28, 2013. The ones used on these occasions were: - “Iyattralum, eettalum, kattalum, katta Vakuthalam Vallath Arasu” (To be able to increase wealth, to lay it up and guard, And also well to distribute it, marks a royal lord) - “Kalangathu Kanda Vinaikkan Thulangkathu Thookkang Kadinthu Seyal” (What clearly eye discerns as right, with steadfast will And mind unslumbering, that should man fulfil) A favorite of the user, their utility stems from the fact that 700 of them exclusively expounded the virtues of hard work and morality. What are we talking about?
  • 75.  In 2012, an online auction was organized for an object, at a starting price of $850,000. This item was recovered in 1980 from a tall flower urn in Upper West Manhattan, by a maintenance man named Philip Michael who was walking home from a wrestling match at Madison Square Garden. A conversation with a cab driver helped him realizing its significance, and he handed it over to the police. He applied to have it returned after one year and it came back with a letter of gratitude and slightly worn, with 16 small police notations and enhanced fingerprints.  What was this thing?
  • 76.  The 4,000 odd inhabitants of an Asian UNESCO World Heritage Site comprising of 3 major islands (Padar, Rinca, X) and 26 smaller ones have adopted certain changes to their burial customs over the years. The graves have been gradually moved from their former sandy locations to clay ground with rocks piled on top.  What prompted these changes?
  • 77.  This annual fashion event began 7 years ago as a hobby, the first edition featuring a limited collection of saris created by the designer and his wife. Over the years, it has become a fullfledged, celebrated event, the designs inspired by the puranas, tiger stripes, mythical birds, intricate mirror-mosaic patterns in palaces, chevrons etc. By utilizing elements from both Hindu and Islamic cultures, the event also aims at uniting the two main religions of the area the designer belonged to.  Who was the designer? OR Identify the brand. Image follows.
  • 78.  Regarded as the most heavily guarded animal refuge in the world, this 1000 sq. km. region is home to 70 mammal species, 3,000 plant species and over 300 bird species. The wildlife diversity of the area is due to its geographic diversity, covering everything from mountains to wetlands to forests, and even a bit of coastal area. Rare species like the Siberian tiger, the Amur leopard, the red-crowned crane and the white-naped crane have all been sighted here. The only threat to the survival of this area, amazingly, is peace.  Which involuntary park, also one of the best-preserved areas of temperate habitat in the world?
  • 79.  The leaf springs of recycled truck suspensions is the most popular material for this purpose because their high carbon content produces a quality of hardness in the final product that allows it to be flexed without breaking. However, many people use sections of rail that has been packed by freight wheel impact. These items are imported in large quantities from a neighboring country. Making a single final product is a task that takes four men an entire day.  What is this object, that also featured in the climax of Bram Stoker’s Dracula? Pics of the initial stages of the process follow.
  • 80.  Identify and connect.  2 videos removed.  Premise of the removed vids: Scenes from Amelie, where she fakes a letter to one of her female friends, posing as her dead husband.
  • 81. Amelie reads a newspaper article about a mailbag being discovered from an air crash on Mont Blanc and fakes a final love letter to her friend from her late husband who died in the crash. This is based on the 1950 crash (Flight 245). In a curious case of life imitating art, a real airmail bag was recovered at the site in 2011.
  • 82.  They are derived from the design of Tallit, a traditional prayer shawl. However, it has been alleged by some groups that they represent the rivers Nile and Euphrates, and indicate the desire to conquer all the land between the two rivers, which would involve much of Egypt, all of Jordan, and some of Syria and Iraq.  What are we talking about?
  • 83.  Saifee Villa, a house located in a village in the Navsari district, was home to the head of the Dawoodi Bohras. It was given a facelift by the Archaeological Survey of India in June 2013 and 15 acres of land opposing it was acquired by the Government of India for a sculptural-cum-architectural complex. This complex, designed by IIT-B, includes a 70-metre high solar-illuminated pyramid topped by white crystals, a small lake, and human figurines. It aims to extol the virtues of renewable energy resources along with its other intended purpose.  What is its actual purpose? Why was Saifee Villa chosen as the location? Images follow.
  • 84.  The Unicorn and the Wasp, aired by BBC One on 17 May 2008, was the 7th episode of the series 4 of the revived Doctor Who franchise. The storyline features the Doctor landing at a dinner party in England in 1926. One of the other guests at the event is X, and together they start investigating a series of murders that occur at the party. They conclude that the murderer is the son of the landlady, who happens to be an alien in human form who communicates through a necklace. The episode ends with X grabbing the necklace and luring the alien away to a nearby pool, where it drowns. X is spared, but is left with total amnesia and is dropped by the Doctor at a hotel in Yorkshire.  Who is X? What real-life mystery does this episode try to explain?
  • 85.  Joseph Dupleix was appointed governor general of all French establishments in India in 1742, while Robert Clive set shop in Madras in 1744. The next decade saw a series of conflicts between the two men in and around Madras, as part of the Indian theatre of the War of the Austrian Succession. The major events included the Battle of Madras (1746), the Siege of Pondicherry (1748) and the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle (1748) which gave Madras back to the British in exchange for the French fortress of Louisbourg in Canada.  In spite of the animosity between the two men, venues named after them exist next to each other in Chennai today. Where?
  • 86.  It consisted of three parts – a 3x5 ft nylon item (purchased for $5.50 from a Sears store), a two-part telescoping pole with a telescoping crossbar (costing $75) and a protective shroud (that cost many hundred dollars). To make it easily accessible and because available space was limited, it was mounted on the exterior during transport. Problems were experienced with the crossbar during its eventual deployment. This, however, lead to the 5 future attempts intentionally leaving the crossbar partially retracted. The nylon component has been fully bleached white over the years.  What are we talking about?
  • 87.  On 16 Jan 2004, the BBC Symphony Orchestra gave the first ever orchestral performance in the UK of a seminal composition in the opening concert of its annual Composer Weekend. BBC Radio 3 broadcast the performance live, despite the risks involved in airing the piece. The only precaution they took was to switch off their emergency backup systems that were designed to cut in in the event of an apparent problem.  Which piece? Why was the precaution taken?
  • 88.  This brand was originally introduced in 1910 by Bayuk Cigars was made in Philadelphia and is today produced by Altadis U.S.A., which is in turn owned by Imperial Tobacco.  The brand was extremely popular amongst the American youth in the early half of the 20th century because it was cheap (each piece cost only 5 cents). The most popular variety was the Blunt (rolled in one leaf so that the end would taper) and the contents could be emptied and re-rolled with other smoking mixtures, the most common being marijuana.  The single biggest claim to fame of the brand, however, would be a representation in 1942 that highlighted its low cost.  Which brand? Where did this ad appear?
  • 89.  In Feb 2013, advertising websites all over the globe carried news of an extremely innovative ad seeking new artists, by the Turkish agency BURO for the Berrge Tattoo Parlor in Istanbul. The ad was in effect the first step of the interview process and applicants had to prove their drawing skills by carefully filling in an outline that was faintly visible on the ad. The process required extremely steady hands and the perfectly filled in ads directed one to the next stage in the recruitment process, an official application form by email.  What exactly did the applicants have to fill? Image follows.
  • 90.  The Reynolds Building is a 314 feet skyscraper in WinstonSalem, North Carolina. Finished in 1929, it has 21 floors and functioned as the headquarters of R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, the second-largest tobacco company in the U.S., for a very long time.  Every year, staff at the building receive a Father's Day card. Who sends these cards?
  • 91.  The standard issue footwear for the Indian Army is the Direct Moulded Sole (DMS) boots. These, however, tend to be slippery and hence soldiers posted at high altitude or jungle locations are issued suitable replacements. In early 2009, the Army placed an order for around 400 pairs of special, non-slippery shoes for a peace-time engagement on 14 July 2009. This was a first for the Indian Army, and the Maratha Light Infantry regiment was given charge of the same.  What task? Why did these boots have to be non-slippery?
  • 92. Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R92rJ0DNiLY#t=216
  • 93. so tagore thank you many crowd wow iit more kyuss need lunch heil qfi