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The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals
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The KQA April Open Quiz - Finals

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  • 1. THE APRIL OPEN QUIZ ZE FINALE
  • 2.  5 Rounds Round 1 – Written Round (8 questions) Round 2 – Dry Clockwise (18 questions) Round 3 – Written Round (8 questions) Round 4 – Dry Anticlockwise (18 questions) Round 5 – Differential Scoring (6 questions) A total of 37 (prelims)+ 58(finals) = 95 questions in the quiz
  • 3.  Everyone at the KQA! Hari Parameswaran, for being the perfect Guinea Pig + Roger Ebert Arun AS, for patiently sitting through the set (after going 4 pegs down i.e.)
  • 4.  Diagnose, Brothers Medical signs that are named after their resemblance to various things Answers to be written down 10 points for each correct answer Bonus of 10 for getting all 8 correct
  • 5.  It is a common finding seen on contrast-enhanced CT scans of the abdomen and the brain. The sign indicates a well-defined round or oval mass with increased attenuation in one half of its area and decreased attenuation in the other half. It is helpful in facilitating the diagnosis of partially thrombosed true arterial aneurysms and false aneurysms. Name the sign.
  • 6.  It is a sign that involves prominent knobs of bone at the costochondral joints of rickets patients. The appearance results from a deficiency of calcium resulting in lack of mineralization and an overgrowth of costochondral joint cartilage. What is the appearance called?
  • 7.  It is a trachea that has an abnormal shape caused by COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). The sign depicts diffuse progressive lateral narrowing of the intra-thoracic portion of the trachea. The sign derives its name after its resemblance to something from the world of weaponry. What?
  • 8.  Portal hypertension refers to high blood pressure in the portal vein system of the liver. One of the commonest signs in Portal Hypertension is the appearance of distended and engorged paraumbilical veins, which are seen radiating from the umbilicus across the abdomen to join systemic veins. What is this appearance called?
  • 9.  Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease involving collections of chronic inflammatory cells (granulomas) that can form nodules in multiple organs. One of the radiological findings in Sarcoidosis is selective Gallium-67 uptake by lacrimal, parotid and submandibular glands thereby giving its characteristic appearance. The sign takes its name from its similarity to what?
  • 10.  Spondylolisthesis is the anterior displacement of one vertebra with respect to another and frequently occurs at the lumbosacral junction. Many a time, a severely subluxed L5 vertebral body projects end-on and overlaps the sacrum. The sign is seen on an anteroposterior view of the lumbosacral junction with end-on view of the fifth lumbar (L5) vertebral body projected against the image of the sacrum. The appearance is very similar to an inverted X, used by many militaries from the late 18th-early 20th century, but most commonly associated with Y. Identify X or Y.
  • 11.  Gallstones are produced by accretion of bile components. They vary in size and shape from as small as a grain of sand to as large as a golf ball. The gallbladder may contain a single large stone or many smaller ones. One of the commonest radiological findings in gallstones is collection of gas within the stones, usually Nitrogen, in a tri- radiate fashion. This gas fills crevices created by shrinkage of cholesterol crystals in the stone and gives a typical appearance. What is this appearance called?
  • 12.  Liver abscesses are caused by bacterial, parasitic, or fungal infection. The commonest variety is the Amoebic Liver abscess due to Entamoeba histolytica. The typical finding in a case of Amoebic Liver abscess is sterile pus with liquefied necrotic liver tissue, giving a reddish-brown appearance. This feature is named after its visual resemblance to a culinary item. What?
  • 13.  It is a common finding seen on contrast-enhanced CT scans of the abdomen and the brain. The sign indicates a well-defined round or oval mass with increased attenuation in one half of its area and decreased attenuation in the other half. It is helpful in facilitating the diagnosis of partially thrombosed true arterial aneurysms and false aneurysms. Name the sign.
  • 14.  It is a sign that involves prominent knobs of bone at the costochondral joints of rickets patients. The appearance results from a deficiency of calcium resulting in lack of mineralization and an overgrowth of costochondral joint cartilage. What is the appearance called?
  • 15.  It is a trachea that has an abnormal shape caused by COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). The sign depicts diffuse progressive lateral narrowing of the intra-thoracic portion of the trachea. The sign derives its name after its resemblance to something from the world of weaponry. What?
  • 16.  Portal hypertension refers to high blood pressure in the portal vein system of the liver. One of the commonest signs in Portal Hypertension is the appearance of distended and engorged paraumbilical veins, which are seen radiating from the umbilicus across the abdomen to join systemic veins. What is this appearance called?
  • 17.  Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease involving collections of chronic inflammatory cells (granulomas) that can form nodules in multiple organs. One of the radiological findings in Sarcoidosis is selective Gallium-67 uptake by lacrimal, parotid and submandibular glands thereby giving its characteristic appearance. The sign takes its name from its similarity to what?
  • 18.  Spondylolisthesis is the anterior displacement of one vertebra with respect to another and frequently occurs at the lumbosacral junction. Many a time, a severely subluxed L5 vertebral body projects end-on and overlaps the sacrum. The sign is seen on an anteroposterior view of the lumbosacral junction with end-on view of the fifth lumbar (L5) vertebral body projected against the image of the sacrum. The appearance is very similar to an inverted X, used by many militaries from the late 18th-early 20th century, but most commonly associated with Y. Identify X or Y.
  • 19.  Gallstones are produced by accretion of bile components. They vary in size and shape from as small as a grain of sand to as large as a golf ball. The gallbladder may contain a single large stone or many smaller ones. One of the commonest radiological findings in gallstones is collection of gas within the stones, usually Nitrogen, in a tri- radiate fashion. This gas fills crevices created by shrinkage of cholesterol crystals in the stone and gives a typical appearance. What is this appearance called?
  • 20.  Liver abscesses are caused by bacterial, parasitic, or fungal infection. The commonest variety is the Amoebic Liver abscess due to Entamoeba histolytica. The typical finding in a case of Amoebic Liver abscess is sterile pus with liquefied necrotic liver tissue, giving a reddish-brown appearance. This feature is named after its visual resemblance to a culinary item. What?
  • 21.  Dry round Clockwise 18 questions Bounce - +10 Pounce - +10, -5
  • 22.  Of all the news stories that covered the Feb 2013 Russian meteor, it was widely agreed that the best headline came from The Boston Globe. The credit for the headline went to Mark Morrow, deputy managing editor and projects. Morrow adapted the headline from a 40 year old work of fiction, which he was a big fan of, as the images of the meteor were something that he could finally compare to the adapted part. What was the headline? What was its source? Image in the next slide.
  • 23.  This book tells the story of X, who had to leave his study of medicine and practice an alternate profession (that was marked by a dark red coat) in order to make ends meet for his family. His son Y adopted the same profession and is a subject of folklore thanks to Z telling him, “Pardon me sir, I meant not to do it”, in an effort to maintain dignity. Who is Z? Why did Z say this?
  • 24.  While it is widely thought that the appearance indicated a mechanical problem, the reason was that a cushion and 19 liters of a substance had to be retrieved. These two items were needed for something that the French tried to wash out in the 19th century, but remained largely unsuccessful. The utilization of these items is the central motif of this Peter Hopkins painting titled “Ambassadors of Goodwill”, one of the two men borne by the coolies being U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara. What are we talking about? Who is the other man in the painting? Image in the next slide.
  • 25.  The Paratrooper Wings (Para Wings) are awarded to a soldier after completing 5 mandatory jumps during the Para course. During the Presidential Air Fleet review in 2007 to mark the platinum jubilee celebrations of the IAF, an Indian Armed Forces soldier performed two para-jumps to set an example for young officers, in an effort to inspire them to maintain highest standards of fitness and mental alertness. This person had received his wings just 2 years earlier in 2005, and holds a very unique distinction as a result. Who? What distinction?
  • 26.  Charity Caritas is an Italian charity that chalked up a plan in 2006 to set up a supermarket that offered essential items free of charge to the poor people in the capital region. Families were given a top-up card by their local councils which could be swapped for basic food items at the supermarket. The charity has distributed about 800,000 euros ($1.26 million) annually over the years to the needy, the whole process supported by a daily activity between 6 and 7 a.m. What is the source for the funds needed for this project?
  • 27.  Rumors of Spanish soldiers being sacrificed for a specific purpose is thought to be one of the factors that lead to the Spanish Civil War. Also, Alexandra Feodorovna’s concern over her only son contributed directly to the Russian Revolution. A very early theory was that underlying all of these events there was a common factor - that the lady (who drew the self-portrait in the next slide) was an illegitimate child. What are we talking about? Image in the next slide.
  • 28.  These structures (and improvement in their designs) were necessitated by the advent of the Industrial Age, when dams and other river obstructions became larger and more common. Their main working principle is that the velocity of water falling over has to be high enough, but it cannot be so great that it nullifies their intended purpose. What are these called and what purpose do they serve? Also name the specialized subset of these structures. Images in the next 2 slides.
  • 29.  X is an organization established in 2001 by a former newspaper editor named John Richards. The organization went on to win an IgNobel prize the same year for the “efforts to protect, promote, and defend the differences between Y and Z”. Ventures by the people pictured have been the subjects of X’s wrath in the recent years. Solve for X, Y and Z. Images in the next slide.
  • 30. Madame Tussauds Harrods Selfridges They have all dropped theapostrophe from their names
  • 31.  He is a self-confessed Star Trek fan. In 1996, he appeared in the Star Trek: Voyager episode "Investigations", in a non-speaking cameo. A Star Trek theme park will also open in 2014 in his country, with him as the majority local investor. Who? Why could he not have a speaking role?
  • 32.  Hoganas AB is a Swedish multinational company that was founded in 1797, originally as a coal mine. It also made stoneware ceramics for the paper-mill industry and is today the worlds largest producer of powdered metals. About half a century back, the firm got an order for a million of their ceramic products (1,056,006 being the final number produced) in 2 visually similar colours, with the condition that they retained their visual qualities even when they became dirty. It took Hoganas 3 years to manufacture these 120 sq.mm. items, made from clay with a small percentage of crushed stone. For what purpose were these used?
  • 33.  The second major clash on the Western Front during WW I was a decisive Allied strategic victory. It ended any hopes of a quick victory for Germany in the West and they were forced to face a long, costly war on two fronts. The heroes of the Battle were the French Sixth Army who exploited the open flanks of the Germans. However, the Sixth Army was soon pushed back into a defensive posture. But, they received a much needed boost in the form of over 6,000 men of the 7th Division who arrived from Paris, even though army vehicles and drivers were in shortage. Name the battle. How did the French soldiers reach the battlefront and thereby save Paris?
  • 34.  Pictured are structures in New York, Madrid, Turin and Leiden. All of them came up in the late 60s and early 70s. What prompted their installation? Images follow.
  • 35. Temple of Dendur – NYTemple of Debod – Madrid Temple of Ellesyia – TurinTemple of Taffeh – Leiden
  • 36.  This ‘invented’ event deviated heavily from tradition, a fact that is echoed in the usage of a carriage and transmitter vans. Principal participants included soldiers from the Rajputana Rifles, Madras Regiment, the Corps of Signals, Bengal Sappers, Sailors of the Navy etc. with Gorkhas and paratroopers leading the event. The elaborate design, planning and execution of the same has been described as a ‘self-conscious manifestation of state sovereignty intended to inscribe state power.’ It is also thought that this event led to underground trade of an item with multiple locations still thought to be holding it without legitimate authority. What event? What item?
  • 37.  These strings/wires can be seen in many neighborhoods (especially in one particular Asian country) all over the world, usually over a 24-hour period in a week. They are always more then 1 metre in height and cover an area of at least 12 square feet, with the condition that this area is frequented by less than 6,00,000 people every day. They are intended to mimic the form of walls, which need doorways, in this case usually defined as two posts with a crossbeam over them, strong enough to withstand an ordinary wind. What are these called? What is their purpose? Images follow.
  • 38.  Regis Bossu was witness to something in 1979 that was described as “typical of a Greek tragedy, a suffocating one, in which lovers get too compromised on each other, despite of knowing that there is no future in that poisoned relationship.” His version of the event inspired a Russian painter named Dmitri Vrubel to an iconic work after 11 years. This work was vandalized over the years, and totally destroyed in 2009. Vrubel was approached to re-do the work, and before starting, Vrubel and Bossu posed with miniatures of their works at the project site. What are we talking about? Image in the next slide.
  • 39.  The Warriors is a 1913 painting by one of the foremost American painters of the early 20th century, Marsden Hartley. The painting found its most famous use four years later as a result of its simple nature and typical shape. This use involved references including pointers in the direction of the cartoon strip Mutt and Jeff, and the word ‘Richard’, the french slang for money-bags. The aim, thus, was a portrayal to oppose poverty. What was this use? Image in the next slide.
  • 40.  These items were found over the past 50 years by researchers at the bottom of a location whose name is variously translated as Sea of Seaweed / Sea of Reed. The modern name of this place is the result of an inaccurate translation. These were either a hoax, parts of a drowned ferry or coral deposits that had collected over the years. Nevertheless, for a long time, they were (and still are) rumored to be something else, as they provided irrefutable evidence. What were these items believed to be? What did they supposedly lend proof to? Images in the next 2 slides.
  • 41.  Work X was reviled by Ophthalmologists. They were irked by X portraying human eyes as contracted after death (instead of dilated eyes). This resulted in them writing en masse to Y about the mistake and how it could have been corrected with the use of Belladonna. Y’s defence was that the contact lenses needed for the correct appearance would have required 6 weeks of acclimatization, and hence the decision to forego their use. However, Y accepted the doctors’ advise and future works never repeated this error. What are we talking about?
  • 42.  Written Round 10 points for each answer Bonus of 10 for getting all 8 There’s a trick to solving this round, which, of course, I am not going to reveal 
  • 43. Connect and explain. Video removed.Link - http://vimeo.com/26515422
  • 44.  It is a thin, usually square cracker made from white flour, shortening, yeast, baking soda, and lightly sprinkled with coarse salt. The surface is dotted with perforations, to allow steam to escape for uniform rising, and along the edges, as individual crackers are broken from larger sheets during manufacture. A popular challenge in which a person has to eat 6 of them in 60 seconds is used by physicians for a particular purpose. What is this food item called? What is its medical utility? Image in the next slide.
  • 45.  This 2010 novel was intended as a riposte to another work X. The central location in X is the mining-port town Y. Y returned to limelight in the mid 80s thanks to Z that, according to its creator, drew inspiration from the Vietnam War. Solve for Y and Z.
  • 46.  More than four tons of foliage, including eight, 20 foot high trees were used to create the appearance a lavish country garden. Six field maples were used to create a ‘Living Avenue’ while two hornbeams were involved in the formation of a leafy ‘frame’ at the distal end of the avenue. ‘These wonderful curved ceilings are supposed to reflect the branches of trees and that was what I thought of when I thought of having trees here,’ was what the ‘floral artistic director’, Shane Connolly had to say about this 2011 idea. What was turned into the ‘Living Avenue’? What was the occasion? Image follows.
  • 47.  This is X’s grave in the Meru National Park, after passing away due to complications from a tick-borne disease called Babesiosis at the age of 5 years in 1961. Identify X. Image in the next slide.
  • 48.  This figurine of a young female with exaggerated anatomical features under a tree in various provocative poses is a standard decorative element of South Indian Hindu sculpture. Usually set in front of the sanctum sanctorum as a sacred guard to the deity, they represent the ideal female form. The name of the motif itself is derived from the name of the particular variety of tree featured. Name the tree and the motif.
  • 49.  According to Islamic tradition, a Muslim may not be given any of the 99 names of Allah in exactly the same form because of the belief that Allah is almighty, and no human being is his equivalent. As a result, muslims are allowed to use the 99 names of Allah for themselves, provided they avoid ‘X’ before the names. However, the names can be prefixed with ‘Y’, meaning "servant/worshiper" and is a common part of Muslim names. Also, another faith considers Z (image in the next slide) to be the 100th and greatest name of Allah and is the root word for many symbols and names in the faith. Solve for X, Y and Z.
  • 50.  A response to James Joyces Ulysses, it was intended as an uninterrupted 24 hours in the life of Ondine, a devoted amphetamine user. A nearly word-for-word transcription of tapes recorded by the author and Ondine over a 2 year period in 1965-67, each chapter is named for its respective tape and side, from ‘1/1’ to ‘24/2’. Four typists including Maureen Tucker of Velvet Underground were involved in the typing of this roman a clef, the title of which refers to amphetamines and is a homage to e.e. cummings. Name the book and author.
  • 51. Connect and explain. Video removed.Link - http://vimeo.com/26515422
  • 52.  Name given to strips of thin line tied between the shrouds of a sailing ship to form a ladder. Ratlines were a system of escape routes for Nazis and other fascists fleeing Europe after WW II. These routes mainly led toward havens in South America. There were two primary routes: the first went from Germany to Spain to Argentina; the second from Germany to Rome to Genoa, then South America.
  • 53.  It is a thin, usually square cracker made from white flour, shortening, yeast, baking soda, and lightly sprinkled with coarse salt. The surface is dotted with perforations, to allow steam to escape for uniform rising, and along the edges, as individual crackers are broken from larger sheets during manufacture. A popular challenge in which a person has to eat 6 of them in 60 seconds is used by physicians for a particular purpose. What is this food item called? What is its medical utility? Image in the next slide.
  • 54.  This 2010 novel was intended as a riposte to another work X. The central location in X is the mining-port town Y. Y returned to limelight in the mid 80s thanks to Z that, according to its creator, drew inspiration from the Vietnam War. Solve for Y and Z.
  • 55.  More than four tons of foliage, including eight, 20 foot high trees were used to create the appearance a lavish country garden. Six field maples were used to create a ‘Living Avenue’ while two hornbeams were involved in the formation of a leafy ‘frame’ at the distal end of the avenue. ‘These wonderful curved ceilings are supposed to reflect the branches of trees and that was what I thought of when I thought of having trees here,’ was what the ‘floral artistic director’, Shane Connolly had to say about this 2011 idea. What was turned into the ‘Living Avenue’? What was the occasion? Image follows.
  • 56.  This is X’s grave in the Meru National Park, after passing away due to complications from a tick-borne disease called Babesiosis at the age of 5 years in 1961. Identify X. Image in the next slide.
  • 57.  This figurine of a young female with exaggerated anatomical features under a tree in various provocative poses is a standard decorative element of South Indian Hindu sculpture. Usually set in front of the sanctum sanctorum as a sacred guard to the deity, they represent the ideal female form. The name of the motif itself is derived from the name of the particular variety of tree featured. Name the tree and the motif.
  • 58.  According to Islamic tradition, a Muslim may not be given any of the 99 names of Allah in exactly the same form because of the belief that Allah is almighty, and no human being is his equivalent. As a result, muslims are allowed to use the 99 names of Allah for themselves, provided they avoid ‘X’ before the names. However, the names can be prefixed with ‘Y’, meaning "servant/worshiper" and is a common part of Muslim names. Also, another faith considers Z (image in the next slide) to be the 100th and greatest name of Allah and is the root word for many symbols and names in the faith. Solve for X, Y and Z.
  • 59.  A response to James Joyces Ulysses, it was intended as an uninterrupted 24 hours in the life of Ondine, a devoted amphetamine user. A nearly word-for-word transcription of tapes recorded by the author and Ondine over a 2 year period in 1965-67, each chapter is named for its respective tape and side, from ‘1/1’ to ‘24/2’. Four typists including Maureen Tucker of Velvet Underground were involved in the typing of this roman a clef, the title of which refers to amphetamines and is a homage to e.e. cummings. Name the book and author.
  • 60. HOW COULD YOU HAVE SOLVED THIS ROUND?
  • 61. Formed by removing one letter from a word and rearranging theremaining letters, repeating the process until only one letter is left RATLINES SALTINE ALIENS AISLE ELSA SAL AL A
  • 62.  Dry round Anticlockwise 18 questions Bounce - +10 Pounce - +10, -5
  • 63.  In 2000, a team of astronomers from the John Hopkins University were examining spectral analysis of different galaxies to study star formation. The dark lines in the studys spectral ranges distinguished between older/younger stars and revealed that the majority of stars formed about 5 billion years ago, their brightness decreasing gradually over this period. These calculations and analysis of 2,00,000 galaxies led to another discovery, and they tried to crowdsource a name for the same by publishing an image in the Washington Post. The winner was an entry sent in by a Peter Drum who was having a drink at a Starbucks coffee house. What was this discovery? What was the name selected?
  • 64.  Praise to the Lord, the Almighty is the most famous hymn of Joachim Neumann, considered to be the one of the first important hymnists after the Protestant Reformation. He wrote and provided music for about 60 hymns and cited nature in general and the region pictured in particular as the inspiration for his poems. He also held gatherings and services here, at which he gave sermons. The region itself was later renamed in his honor. What other claim to fame does this region have? Image follows.
  • 65.  Zamzar is a free popular online file converter created by brothers Mike and Chris Whyley and based in Winchester, England. Their mission (as per their website) is “To provide high quality file conversion for as many file formats as possible”. Why did the brothers settle on the name Zamzar?
  • 66.  This is an 18 hole par 72 golf course, said to be “the Worlds Longest Golf course”, the average distance between holes being 66 kilometres. It is located on the worlds largest single piece of limestone (named for its lack of trees) which also has the longest straight section of railway in the world (478 km). Name the course/location. What does the 7th/12th Hole at Balladonia commemorate and is named after? Image in the next slide.
  • 67.  According to author Florence Williams, the subject of this book contains “paint thinners, dry-cleaning fluids, wood preservatives, toilet deodorizers, cosmetic additives, gasoline by-products, rocket fuel, termite poisons, fungicides, and flame-retardants.” The subject is also the source of about 1,000 mega joules of energy per year. Williams was prompted to write the book by a newspaper article on the toxins in the subject [specifically, chemical flame retardants] that got her husband to joke “Well, at least they wont spontaneously ignite!”. Name the book/subject(s). Image in the next slide.
  • 68.  The last wish of Richard Strauss was that the Wagnerian soprano, Kirsten Flagstad should be the person to introduce The Four Songs, which he finished in 1948. “I would like to make it possible that the songs should be at your disposal for a world premiere in the course of a concert with a first-class conductor and orchestra”, he wrote to her. Sadly, he died 8 months before this came true. Strausss wish was fulfilled by X, the first president of the Philharmonia Concert Society, by sponsoring an evening at the Royal Albert Hall by Londons Philharmonia Orchestra with German conductor Wilhelm Furtwangler in the lead, in 1950. Identify X, who is directly connected to the field of quizzing thanks to a 1962 inauguration. Also, what did X inaugurate?
  • 69.  Pictured is Chateau de Chambord, one of the best known examples of Frances architectural history and the inspiration for the Beasts castle in the 1991 animated Disney film Beauty and the Beast. It was commissioned by Francis I in the early 16th century and features 128 meters of facade, more than 800 sculpted columns and an elaborately decorated roof. With such an elaborate design, Francis I was trying to pay tribute to one of his acts (which was the result of a controversial move for a Christian king at the time). What? What was the primary role served by the Chateau (and Chateau de Valencay) during WW II? Images follow.
  • 70.  The Creus Cape peninsula is the point where the Pyrenees meet the Mediterranean Sea and also the easternmost point of the Spanish mainland. It has the distinction of being the region’s first foreshore natural reserve and is notable for endemic species such as Statice and the Stripeless Tree Frog. The region is frequently swept by the awful north wind “Tramontana” which has caused many naval disasters in the area. What caused this natural formation to receive worldwide recognition in the early 1930s and consequent increase in tourism thereafter? Images follow.
  • 71.  This musical instrument X was very popular in the beginning of the 20th century. It reached its heyday in vaudeville, and died with it around WW II. Apart from the disappearance of its main performance venue, the other reason that caused its decline was that all the steel was used up for ammunition. The instrument is played by bending its active part and then finding the flat ‘sweet spot’. Featured is Y, one of the foremost experts, playing it. Y played the X at performances for the soldiers during WW II, in movies, on radio, and for friends at parties. Solve for X and Y. Audio removed. Link – An edited version of this was used - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMLG5iqh5c0
  • 72.  Foreign publications often get into a tussle with patriotic Indian authorities over the depiction of the geographical boundaries of India in maps and infographs. Publications like The Economist, for instance, have borne the wrath of the censors for showing parts of Kashmir as belonging to Pakistan and China. How did The New York Times skirt this tricky issue for a 2011 venture? Also, connect this border issue to the recent 4-0 whitewash of Australia.
  • 73.  The show with Zefrank was a web video show by online performance artist Zefrank that ran from March 2006 to March 2007. The show, that ran 2-3 minutes in length, combined commentary on current events with viewer contributions. On the May 16, 2006 episode, he challenged his viewers to create a sandwich, the first such in history. After other legitimate attempts failed (one had a Fijian calling up an embassy in Mali), the task was completed within one month by Duncan and Jon Rawlinson in Spain who collaborated with a guy named Morgan in New Zealand. What type of sandwich were they trying to create?
  • 74.  Their popularity is generally attributed to Bal Gangadhar Tilak. Traditionally, mud taken from nearby one’s home was used for the central motif. After use, it was returned back to the Earth. This cycle was meant to represent the cycle of creation and dissolution in Nature. Substitutes for mud in recent years have prompted installation of structures such as these. What are we talking about? Image in the next slide.
  • 75.  Chesterfield Football Club is an English football club based in Chesterfield, Derbyshire, which currently plays in Football League Two, the fourth tier of English football. The club’s crest features a unique 1362 construction, which also gives the club its nickname. The original theory put forward to explain the strange nature of this structure was the absence of skilled men (the real reason is believed to be the use of unseasoned timber and 33 tons of lead). Why is it unique? Why were skilled workers not available? Image follows.
  • 76.  John F. Kennedy was sworn in as the 44th President of the United States on January 20, 1961. However, it began snowing the night before and this continued into the early morning on the day of the inauguration. This left over 8 inches of snow on the streets of Washington and caused the most crippling traffic jam (for its time). This also posed the problem of transporting the future president to the Capitol. When conventional methods, what innovation conceived by Richard Fiedler in the 1900s was adopted to cut through the ice and clear the snow on Pennsylvania avenue?
  • 77.  Liquorice is the root of Glycyrrhiza glabra and yields a very sweet flavor. Its active principle is glycyrrhizin, which is 30 to 50 times as sweet as sucrose. It is used in confectionaries, soft drinks, tobacco products and for various medicinal purposes. One of its lesser known uses was masterminded in 1925 by the firm of Hillabys of Pontefract, West Yorkshire, known for their liquorice cakes. They were asked for a specific product, 63 of which were consumed over 3 days, depleting the hormone reserves and resulting in Insulin shock. The consumer had to be hospitalized and stomach wash had to be carried out for recovery from these effects. What was the product?
  • 78.  Various events like father’s stroke, unemployment etc. brought X to the verge of a complete nervous collapse which took the form of extreme hypersensitivity and OCD. As part of the recovery plan, X took to walking in the location pictured with an assistant, reciting lines from Y, about the dying of the day and a new day being born at the same time: This suddenly gave X the solution to Z, and wrote it down with a stick on the ground. Solve for X, Y and Z. Image in the next slide.
  • 79.  Brazilian superstar Ronaldo was found to be overweight during Copa America 99. Every possible way was explored to get him to drop some pounds and the team doctor gave him a laxative named Xenical which was very effective. However, the medicine was not without side-effects and was a source of big embarrassment for Ronaldo and evoked comparisons with Gary Lineker at the 1990 World Cup (vs. the Republic of Ireland). What did Robaldo do to counter the side-effects? What did Gary Lineker do in the match against Ireland?
  • 80.  Video removed Link - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2R1QABw5v_w
  • 81.  “My biggest challenge fell below the waist. At first, I wasnt sure how to work around the hip exposure. The upper portion of the bustier was not an issue and I was able to leave that untouched. I knew that the hip had to be covered, so I developed concepts that addressed the questionable area while still allowing an illusion of exposure.” Talking is fashion designer Mohini Tadikonda, about a project set to open in Candolim, Goa. His creation is the only one of its kind specially made to adhere to local guidelines. What project? What concept did he develop to address the questionable area and therefore stick to local guidelines?
  • 82.  Differential Scoring Answers to be shown in writing Point scheme 1-3  +20 4-6  +15 7-8  +10 Negative of - 5
  • 83.  A part of the Elgin Marbles collection, this 5th century creation by Phidias, is regarded as the most famous and best loved of all in the set on display in the British Museum. As per the British Museum, “As the unseen vehicle was shown sinking low in the west, the horse pins back its ears, the jaw gapes, the nostrils flare, the eyes bulge, veins stand out and the flesh seems spare and taut over the flat plate of the cheek bone.” Multiple casts of the sculpture exist, one even in its original location , the east pediment of Parthenon. Identify. What brought the sculpture into popular consciousness in the mid 19th century? Images follow.
  • 84.  The Cotton-top tamarin is one of the smallest primates and weighs < 0.5 kg. It is easily recognized by the long white sagittal crest extending from its forehead to shoulders. The species is critically endangered with only 6,000 odd animals left. The primate gets its common name from its resemblance to X, the cause of the mid-19th century condition quoted: “It was called the aesthetic St. Vitus dance of all Berliners. The high intensity, often frantic manner provoked involuntary physical reactions – shaking, shuddering and weeping.” What is the common name of the monkey? Also, what is the condition described here? Image in the next slide.
  • 85.  Fluorescein is a synthetic compound that turns from orange/red to a different colour when mixed into water and exposed to sunlight. It is commonly used by militaries to help locate parachutists who have landed in water. Its most famous use was to help locate the Gemini IV, the first NASA mission to be supported from Mission Control in Houston, after its capsule crashed into the ocean more than 40 nautical miles off-course. More than half a century back, Stephen Bailey, manager of the Plumber’s Union of X, detected this compound being used for detecting a leak that was dumping waste into a water body. What did Bailey do when he was appraised of this?
  • 86.  These headphones designed by Seattle-based industrial design firm Teague. Using a series of rigid and stretchable materials placed at precise angles to create a cage-like structure on either side, they balance compression and stress to provide strength and a fair amount of flexibility. As a result, they gently fit around the ears without using any awkward, clunky adjusting devices. They are named for the fact that they look as good as they sound. What name? Also, what/who inspired its design? Image in the next slide.
  • 87.  This annual football match is rated as one of the Top 5 rivalries in UK. The teams that contest it are the Department of Peace Studies of the University of Bradford and the Department of War Studies of King’s College London, both being academic, regional and ideological rivals. The former hold the overall edge with 6 trophies to the latter’s 1. The rolling trophy, that came into existence in 2007 is kept for a year by the winners. The original trophy was retired after the 2011 edition due to its fragile state and was replaced with a new one. Name the tournament. What is the trophy in question? Image in the next slide.
  • 88.  In the early 1980s, with the tacit support of the then Congress government, Lord Swraj Paul, launched an aggressive takeover bid for Escorts Ltd. The board of directors that had X as a member, vehemently opposed the move. The government responded by changing the entire board, a Mr. Naik replacing X. “This is the first time in history when a Naik has replaced a Y”, was X’s response to the saga. Solve for X and Y.

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