Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
The Illuminati Quiz 2013 at Model Engineering College, Kochi - The Finals
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

The Illuminati Quiz 2013 at Model Engineering College, Kochi - The Finals

4,951

Published on

0 Comments
8 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
4,951
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
8
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Ze Finale
  • 2.  Arun Hiregange  Hrishikesh Varma and Arun AS  Prasanth John Abraham and Deepak Thomas, defending champions of The Illuminati Quiz
  • 3.  Write Brothers  Topic – Quizzers. All questions are based on real-life images featuring the who’s who of Indian Quizzing.  11 questions. Answers to be written down. 5 points for every correct answer.  Bonus of 10 points for getting all 11 answers correct.  This is my humble tribute to all the people who find joy in this pursuit for useless knowledge. So, a bonus of 10 points for identifying all the quizzers featured in all the questions   Total of 75 points on offer
  • 4.  He is the youngest Indian in an illustrious list comprising of 4 other members - Dayita Datta, Ajai Banerji, K.E. Priyamvada, and Archana Garodia Gupta.  He entered this list in 2002 at an 1894 Hyderabad construction built in the shape of a scorpion, and with a name which translates to Mirror of the Sky. Today, the location is managed by the Taj Group of Hotels and even has a train (running between Secunderabad and Howrah) named after it.  What list? Which location? Image in the next slide.
  • 5. Whose gravestone? (Bigger pic in the next slide)
  • 6.  From a travel website about this tourist destination:  Guru Rinpoche (Padmasambhava) founded X in the 8th century. He flew to the spot on the back of one of his consorts. She had taken the shape of a _________ for the journey, anticipating Claire Chennault’s World War II Ys by thirteen centuries. The main temple of the X, the one surrounding the cave, was built in 1692, 46 years after the successor of the first Shabdrung visited the spot.  Solve for X and Y. Image in the next slide.
  • 7.  This UNESCO World Heritage site was occupied by the Lodi dynasty and later by the Mughals.  The structure featured as a major plot element in an 1890 work of fiction, as the site of a vast treasure. The work itself was commissioned during a dinner the author had with Joseph Stoddart, editor of Lippincott's Monthly Magazine, at the Langham Hotel in London in August 1889. The third member at the dinner was Oscar Wilde, who contributed The Picture of Dorian Gray to the July 1890 issue.  Name the structure and the work of fiction. Image follows.
  • 8.  This is Eddie the Head, the mascot of Iron Maiden. A perennial fixture on their artwork, his appearance on the cover of their 2nd single ‘Sanctuary’ became controversial for its depiction of Eddie crouching over the corpse of X. The band justified that X had recently visited USSR and following the tough stance with USSR, had earned the nickname Iron Maiden, and Eddie supposedly took offence to this.  Identify X.
  • 9.  The man in the centre had his most famous moment in 1999 at a location that overlooked the National Highway 1D. His exploits at the location finally resulted in his induction into an exclusive group of seven.  Which location? What group are we talking about? (Specific answers required)  Image in the next slide.
  • 10.  This comune B in the Italian region Lombardy was a favored holiday resort of Pliny the Younger and is located at the intersection of the three branches of the Y-shaped lake C.  The comune was the inspiration for the design and naming of a US attraction that opened in 1998 and, among other things, is home to Cirque du Soleil’s aquatic production ‘O’. This attraction, like B, overlooks a 9 acre man-made lake.  B and C have also appeared in a number of books and movies, including Frankenstein and Casino Royale. Just solve for B and C. Images follow.
  • 11.  Le Chat Noir (“The Black Cat”), brainchild of impresario Rodolphe Salis, opened in Nov 1881 in Montmartre, Paris. The venture became a big hit soon, allowing its patrons to sit and drink at tables while being entertained by a variety show on stage. A Swiss guard greeted guests at the door, bringing in painters and poets, while barring the priests and the military. Famous patrons included Paul Verlaine, Claude Debussy, Emile Goudeau, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec etc. It is best known today for its iconic Theophile-Alexandre Steinlen poster art (image follows).  Le Chat Noir is the first ever of what form of entertainment?
  • 12.  A, the son of Rashtrakavi Kuvempu, was a pioneer of protest literature in Kannada. He famously translated Kenneth Anderson's hunting tales and Henri Charriere's Papillon into Kannada, and was awarded the Sahitya Akademi Award in 1987.  B ran away from home as a kid and was brought up on communist ideologies by his uncle. For this reason, he translated works of Pushkin into Tamil and many of his works were translated into Russian. He was also awarded the ‘Order of Friendship’ by Russia in 2011. In 2002, he was honored with the Jnanpith Award for outstanding contributions towards the shaping of Indian literature.  The relationship between A and C is the same as the one between B and D. Identify both A and B (full names). Images in the next slide.
  • 13. A B C D
  • 14. Which famous painting has been parodied here?
  • 15.  “Ronnie Spector - who, it could be argued, all but invented X's style when she took the stage at the Brooklyn Fox Theater with her fellow Ronettes more than 40 years ago - was so taken aback at a picture of X in the New York Post that she exclaimed, "I don't know her, I never met her, when I saw that pic, I thought, 'That's me!' But then I found out, no, it's X! I didn't have on my glasses.”  Excerpt from a 2007 interview with Ronnie Spector, lead singer of the Ronettes, where she talks about the signature hairstyle and Cleopatra make-up that X borrowed from her group. What nickname was given to X’s liver at the 2007 BRIT awards?  The hairstyle is pictured in the next slide.
  • 16.  He is the youngest Indian in an illustrious list comprising of 4 other members - Dayita Datta, Ajai Banerji, K.E. Priyamvada, and Archana Garodia Gupta.  He entered this list in 2002 at an 1894 Hyderabad construction built in the shape of a scorpion, and with a name which translates to Mirror of the Sky. Today, the location is managed by the Taj Group of Hotels and even has a train (running between Secunderabad and Howrah) named after it.  What list? Which location? Image in the next slide.
  • 17. Whose gravestone? (Bigger pic in the next slide)
  • 18.  From a travel website about this tourist destination:  Guru Rinpoche (Padmasambhava) founded X in the 8th century. He flew to the spot on the back of one of his consorts. She had taken the shape of a _________ for the journey, anticipating Claire Chennault’s World War II Ys by thirteen centuries. The main temple of the X, the one surrounding the cave, was built in 1692, 46 years after the successor of the first Shabdrung visited the spot.  Solve for X and Y. Image in the next slide.
  • 19.  This UNESCO World Heritage site was occupied by the Lodi dynasty and later by the Mughals.  The structure featured as a major plot element in an 1890 work of fiction, as the site of a vast treasure. The work itself was commissioned during a dinner the author had with Joseph Stoddart, editor of Lippincott's Monthly Magazine, at the Langham Hotel in London in August 1889. The third member at the dinner was Oscar Wilde, who contributed The Picture of Dorian Gray to the July 1890 issue.  Name the structure and the work of fiction. Image follows.
  • 20.  This is Eddie the Head, the mascot of Iron Maiden. A perennial fixture on their artwork, his appearance on the cover of their 2nd single ‘Sanctuary’ became controversial for its depiction of Eddie crouching over the corpse of X. The band justified that X had recently visited USSR and following the tough stance with USSR, had earned the nickname Iron Maiden, and Eddie supposedly took offence to this.  Identify X.
  • 21.  The man in the centre had his most famous moment in 1999 at a location that overlooked the National Highway 1D. His exploits at the location finally resulted in his induction into an exclusive group of seven.  Which location? What group are we talking about? (Specific answers required)  Image in the next slide.
  • 22.  This comune B in the Italian region Lombardy was a favored holiday resort of Pliny the Younger and is located at the intersection of the three branches of the Y-shaped lake C.  The comune was the inspiration for the design and naming of a US attraction that opened in 1998 and, among other things, is home to Cirque du Soleil’s aquatic production ‘O’. This attraction, like B, overlooks a 9 acre man-made lake.  B and C have also appeared in a number of books and movies, including Frankenstein and Casino Royale. Just solve for B and C. Images follow.
  • 23.  Le Chat Noir (“The Black Cat”), brainchild of impresario Rodolphe Salis, opened in Nov 1881 in Montmartre, Paris. The venture became a big hit soon, allowing its patrons to sit and drink at tables while being entertained by a variety show on stage. A Swiss guard greeted guests at the door, bringing in painters and poets, while barring the priests and the military. Famous patrons included Paul Verlaine, Claude Debussy, Emile Goudeau, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec etc. It is best known today for its iconic Theophile-Alexandre Steinlen poster art (image follows).  Le Chat Noir is the first ever of what form of entertainment?
  • 24.  A, the son of Rashtrakavi Kuvempu, was a pioneer of protest literature in Kannada. He famously translated Kenneth Anderson's hunting tales and Henri Charriere's Papillon into Kannada, and was awarded the Sahitya Akademi Award in 1987.  B ran away from home as a kid and was brought up on communist ideologies by his uncle. For this reason, he translated works of Pushkin into Tamil and many of his works were translated into Russian. He was also awarded the ‘Order of Friendship’ by Russia in 2011. In 2002, he was honored with the Jnanpith Award for outstanding contributions towards the shaping of Indian literature.  The relationship between A and C is the same as the one between B and D. Identify both A and B (full names). Images in the next slide.
  • 25. A B C D
  • 26. Which famous painting has been parodied here?
  • 27.  “Ronnie Spector - who, it could be argued, all but invented X's style when she took the stage at the Brooklyn Fox Theater with her fellow Ronettes more than 40 years ago - was so taken aback at a picture of X in the New York Post that she exclaimed, "I don't know her, I never met her, when I saw that pic, I thought, 'That's me!' But then I found out, no, it's X! I didn't have on my glasses.”  Excerpt from a 2007 interview with Ronnie Spector, lead singer of the Ronettes, where she talks about the signature hairstyle and Cleopatra make-up that X borrowed from her group. What nickname was given to X’s liver at the 2007 BRIT awards?  The hairstyle is pictured in the next slide.
  • 28.  If it is South Parade in Bangalore, what is the corresponding name in Kochi?
  • 29.  Espana Cani, also known as the Spanish Gypsy Dance, is a Spanish piece of pasodoble music by Pascual Narro. The song was written in 1925 and is considered to be the best known snippet of Spanish music ever. It has traditionally been used as background music in bullfights in Spain and elsewhere, and also to arouse local crowds in baseball matches in the United States.  The song was notably used to announce the introduction of (and various other combat activities) a fictional character X in a 1986 work Y. X is the descendant of a line of kings who opposed Tipu Sultan and was also involved in direct combat with the British. X gives away his combat weapons (that have accounted for hundreds of lives) to a local organization during the intro.  Solve for X and Y. What famous question is Y the source of? Audio in the next slide, will be played if no one answers.
  • 30.  17 questions  Clockwise  Infinite Pounce  +10/-5 on the pounce  +10 on the bounce
  • 31.  Chupinazo (or txupinazo in local language) is the name given to a rocket launched precisely at 12:00 noon on the 6th of July from a city hall balcony with thousands of people celebrating the act in the city hall square. The tradition is in existence since 1941. The rocket is usually set off by a member of the different city council political groups beginning with the mayor and then political groups ordered by number of representatives.  What is marked by the launch of the Chupinazo?  Video removed: Link- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JnIDydRt3Bg
  • 32.  Participants and guests at the 1979 Miss Universe pageant (held at Perth on 20 July) were greeted by a unique object on stage. This object was collected about a week prior to the competition.  What was this?  Image in the next slide.
  • 33.  Queen Elizabeth II was in Beijing on a state visit in 1987. However, she was unable to visit the Forbidden City because of the priority given by the Chinese to one of the 2 choices proposed to them by the man pictured.  The rejected choice was Andre Malraux’s La Condition Humaine.  What was the accepted choice?
  • 34.  The Hellisheidi Power Station is the largest geothermal power station in Iceland and the second largest in the world. Located on an active volcanic ridge in Hengill, southwest Iceland, it is capable of producing 303 MW of electricity and 133 MW of hot water. Most of this energy goes to an Aluminium smelter in nearby Grundartangi, owned and operated by the North-American Century Aluminium.  However, every year, the power station also releases 75 KW of electricity daily for a period of 2 months.  What is this energy used for? Image in the next slide.
  • 35.  This is an Apollo 10 photograph of the Rima Ariadaeus region of the moon. It is a rille over 300 km long, and is thought to have been formed when a section of the Moon's crust sank down between two parallel fault lines.  In the last decade, this photograph was used in a media campaign by a muslim scholar-geologist named Dr. Zaghloul El Naggar and a host of agencies following him.  What were they trying to achieve? Image follows.
  • 36.  One of the most famous tennis face-offs of all time happened in 1925.  The two players involved were Gladys Roy and Ivan Unger, both members of a celebrated 1920s group known as ‘13 Black Cats’. Both had many movie appearances and records of a particular nature to their credit.  The match was facilitated by a chap called Frank Tomac and took place at a location that also was the subject of one of the most valuable stamps in history.  Where did the match unfold?
  • 37.  The Great Trigonometric Survey of India began in 1802 when Major William Lambton, the Superintendent, laid the baseline in Madras from St. Thomas Mount in the north to Perumbauk hill at the southern end. Much of the success of the survey is attributed to the rigorous training imparted to the surveyors at Dehradun. This included training on scientific instruments, the art of disguise (as they had to cross over into Tibet), hiding notes inside prayer wheels, taking steps of a fixed length on different surfaces etc.  These surveyors were also given a rosary for their journeys, as part of their disguise as monks. However, what other important function did these beads serve?
  • 38.  This project that began in 1958 is run by the local Chamber of Commerce and was created to buff up the city’s image. A 7member selection committee meets annually to expand the project (by a number of around 2 dozen) and the criteria used are charity work, accolades received and longevity. The final expansion process then takes up to 5 years.  Cosmetic flaws caused by normal weathering to holes and fissures severe enough to constitute a walking hazard have necessitated restoration work on the project in 2008.  What are we talking about?
  • 39.  Tahiti's national football team made its debut at a major FIFA tournament at the 2013 Confederations Cup.  This was a sudden transition from playing before small crowds (the biggest stadium in Tahiti can only seat 10,000) to being surrounded by security, quizzed by the world media, and playing in some of the most famous venues in football.  What did the Tahiti coach Eddie Etaeta do, in an effort to prepare his players for the atmosphere expected in Brazil?
  • 40.  This one-of-a-kind device was called “the most sought after but well-concealed box in the world.” The brainchild of American engineer Charles Douglass, it was put together painstakingly from his analysis of CBS archives which included pieces like Marcel Marceau's 1956 American tour. The concept behind it dates back to 16th century performances of Shakespeare's plays.  Douglass had a monopoly on the craft that came to be known as Sweetening and catered to various parts of the spectrum it dealt with. His immediate family members were the only other people who operated it. Results achieved were subjective and varied with each operator. The gadget made Douglass one of the most talked about and wanted men in the television industry.  It was unearthed in 2010 and was later exhibited in a June 2010 episode of Antiques Roadshow, where its value was approximated at $10,000.  What is this device? Image follows.
  • 41.  Video removed  Link - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpY0Muy_1qI
  • 42.  Authored by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith and first published in 1939, it was dubbed by the Journal of the American Medical Association as “a curious combination of organizing propaganda and religious exhortation, in no sense a scientific book.” One of the best-selling books of all time, it has sold 30 million copies. Richard Nixon received the millionth copy of the book, while the 25-millionth copy of the book was presented to Jill Brown, warden of San Quentin State Prison, the location of the first major prison rendezvous of the beneficiaries of the book.  Which book, that gets its popular name from its size?
  • 43.  This block preserved in a vault under guard in Donnington, Shropshire, was used for the last time on 16 Feb 1970. The weight of the block, after its use by Hancocks & Co of London, was recorded at 358 ounces.  Contrary to popular belief, this was not always the source of its acclaimed derivatives. X-ray analysis has shown that the block did not contribute to any of the first 560 and matched only the ones after 1914. It has also been ascertained that the block can still cater to 85 of these products.  What are we talking about? Image follows.
  • 44.  This Rammstein song is a reworking of Goethe's poem "Der Erlkönig", set in modern world (instead of a horse journey). The song gets its title X from 2 main reasons - X’s well known phobia being one (the cover art a pointer towards this), while the other theory states that that the band used Y, the first VST-instrument to offer both vocal synthesis and a real-time animated 3D interface, while mixing the song. Y also had a very effective built-in stereo delay.  Gimme X or Y. Also, what is pictured on the cover art? Audio removed. Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZZ KLZafk5c
  • 45.  In 1922, the Malankara Estate Superintendent Thomas was on a hunting spree in the nearby forest with Karuvellayan Kolumban, the local head of the Araya tribe. During this trip, they came across 2 granite hills which, according to legend, were a couple who were turned to rocks when cursed by Lord Rama. The poor couple had pleaded for mercy pointing out that they had never lived a life in separation. Lord Rama promised that they will be together forever and locals believe that this promise was fulfilled only in 1973, a long-term consequence of the hunting expedition.  How exactly was Rama’s vow implemented? Image follows.
  • 46.  Charles De Gaulle, during one of his visits to UK, said that he had a cold and therefore couldn't see Harold Macmillan, the Prime Minister. Macmillan felt insulted by this, and exacted revenge in 1962 by wiping out something. British Minister Tony Benn, during his visit to France in 1969, corrected this error by reinstating whatever was eliminated. Benn justified his controversial actions by claiming that he did it to honour Excellence, England, Europe, Entente and even Ecosse (the French name for Scotland).  What are we talking about?
  • 47.  What, ironically, was the subject of the last piece of legislation signed by Abraham Lincoln and brought into force on the day of his assassination, in an effort to prevent counterfeiting?
  • 48.  On Sep 25, 2010, a performance called Brhan-Natya Yagna was organized by the Association of Bharatanatyam Artistes of India (ABHAI) and the Brhan Natyanjali Trust. One thousand dancers from different parts of India and abroad danced to 11 Tamil verses composed by Karuvur Thevar, the choreography done by Padma Subrahmanyam.  The event marked the 1000th anniversary of X. The Indian Government came up with their own tribute, and these were available for sale at Rs. 4800 (approx.) per set.   What is X? What tribute? Video removed. Link - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hvATZJkXNOk
  • 49.  Upon his birth in Bristol in 1871, X was hailed as the first Brahmin baby born in Britain. He became an Indian civil servant in 1894 and served as Diwan of Cochin (1907 to 1914) and as Diwan of Mysore (1922 to 1926). He was later appointed the Prime Minister of Kashmir in 1927, but resigned in 1929 following differences with Raja Hari Singh, the monarch, on the latter's lavish lifestyle.  Name X. OR How is his memory kept alive in Kochi?
  • 50.   This is the demon Apasmara who symbolises Epilepsy and ignorance. The image pictured is a rare one for a certain reason. Where have we seen him? Why is this image rare?
  • 51.  Grid-I-Run  5x5 grid with 25 entries  Solve the grid and form 5 groups with 5 members each. Also, identify the connect in each case.  10 points for each group. 10 points for each connect. Bonus of 20 points for getting everything.  Total of 120 points to be scored.
  • 52. Delhi Zidane Echo Kissinger Kohli Dunant Beijing Alpha Dhoni Charlie Dhawan Tendulkar Baghdad Heitinga Monzon Red Cross Tokyo Hammarskjold Bravo Nansen Delta Dezotti Ojha Desailly Seoul
  • 53. Ukraine Vermeer Samaritans Wales Facebook Great Perm Gold Max Rockatansky Saffron Anthony of Egypt Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Shirley Temple George III Chalk Lion Stereophonics Naples School Bus DNA Jura Mountains Devon Columbus Jack Churchill Disney Channel Anthony Wayne
  • 54. Wales – Cambrian Devon – Devonian Great Perm – Permian Chalk – Cretaceous Jura Mountains – Jurassic
  • 55. Shirley Temple Columbus DNA Vermeer Anthony of Egypt
  • 56. (The)Facebook (The)Disney Channel (The)Ukraine (The)Stereophonics (The)Samaritans
  • 57. BSE - Mad Cow Disease George III - Mad King George Anthony Wayne - Mad Anthony Max Rockatansky - Mad Max Jack Churchill - Mad Jack
  • 58. Gold Naples Lion School Bus Saffron
  • 59.  At the end of Dwaparayuga, the period of Lord Krishna, the Lord himself presented an idol to Arjuna, and asked him to install it in a proper place. He kept the idol in a bag used to keep arrows, which was called X in local language. When he reached the place, he shouted X Y means 'open the bag' in local language. Thus the name came about, according to this story, which is one of many.  Which place?
  • 60.  Which road in Kozhikode shares its name with a 1970s Academy Award winning movie, the working title of which was ‘Anhedonia’?
  • 61.  17 questions  Anticlockwise  Infinite Pounce  +10/-5 on the pounce  +10 on the bounce
  • 62.  It has a bimodal distribution with two durations: either long (more than 4 min) or more rarely short (2-1/2 min). Short durations lead to an interval of just over an hour whereas long ones lead to an interval of about 1-1/2 hours. The margin of error is about +/- 10 minutes and the accuracy is 90%.  Over the years, the length of the interval has increased and has made the mathematical relationship inaccurate, but has in fact made the subject, that has also been used as a laundry, more predictable.  What are we talking about?
  • 63.  The US media, in Dec 2009, was abuzz with the news of a nationwide Salmonella epidemic with more than 50 people getting infected. Most of those who fell ill were younger than 10 years and more than half were girls.  The genesis of the epidemic was traced back to a Disney movie that was released a month prior to these events. However, this was later found to be a hoax, as there wasn’t enough evidence to back it up.  What was the theory postulated to explain the epidemic?
  • 64.  Featured are some of the exhibits from a museum housed in a building called La Casa Azul.  The exhibition is spread over 10 rooms and includes the disability wall which displays orthopedic devices, Room 2 with the various trademark Tehuana pieces, and other galleries with contemporary interpretations by various fashion designers.  The subject of the museum used to prompt questions like “Hey, where’s the circus?”, while traversing San Francisco in the 1930s.  Identify the subject. What was the purpose of the mirror?
  • 65.  Vishwanathan Anand’s challenger for the 2013 World Chess Championship was decided in the 2013 Candidates Tournament that took place in the Savoy Place, London, from 15 Mar – 1 Apr. The eventual winner was Magnus Carlsen.  The event saw a new design for the chess set by Daniel Weil, as the organizers wanted to return chess to its 1970s levels of popularity and sharpen the theatricality during games.  What was the inspiration for the new design? Image in the next slide.
  • 66.  Punnagavarali is an ancient raga associated with the Karuna rasa. It is a janya of the eighth melakarta Hanumathodi and starts and finishes in a single octave (nishada to nishada), hence is usually presented in the madhyama sruti.  In wedding ceremonies, a piece called the ‘Odam’ usually played at the muhurtam, is often in Punnagavarali. Featured is MS Subbulakshmi’s ‘Kanakashaila Viharini’ in this raga.  What exactly is the source/origin of this raga?  Video removed. Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=igv6h7igVV0
  • 67.  Dubbed as the next Niccolo Machiavelli, he was a French Controller-General of Finances under Louis XV. His primary task was to curb the running deficit and strengthen the finances for the Seven Years' War against Britain between 1754–1763. He reduced spending by the royal house, revised pensions, introduced the English method of taxing the rich and taxes on external signs of wealth like farms, luxury goods and servants.  His penny-pinching manner led to his name being applied to things perceived as cheap, including a new alternative art form that was developed by those who could not afford expensive paints and sculpting material.  How does his name survive in today’s world?
  • 68.  WE Gladstone served as the British Prime Minister four times and as Chancellor of the Exchequer another four times. During his second tenure as Chancellor of the Exchequer (1859-1866), he acquired something that was dubbed a stage accessory. It bore the initials VR (Victoria Regina) and was manufactured by the London firm Barrow and Gale. It was in use in Britain until 2010, when it was retired in frail condition. The same tradition is followed in India as well, but the item has almost always been of a different make every single time.  What object, the center of attention once a year, are we talking about?
  • 69.  John Leland, the pastor of Cheshire, Massachusetts, believed that his town’s efforts helped Thomas Jefferson to the Presidency in 1801. As a unique gesture to Jefferson, the town prepared a large block of cheese (1235 pounds) by combining the milk from every cow in town, using a makeshift cheese press to handle its size. The gift was presented on Jan 1, 1802 and was so large that it remained at the White House for two years.  Jefferson named it Cheshire ___________ Cheese, which is the first ever known usage of the word as an adjective (previously only used as a noun). It also popularized the usage of the word in this sense. FITB. Image in the next slide.
  • 70.  This installation by Jewish artist Joseph Semah at the Aspinwall House in Kochi during the Kochi-Muziris Biennale consists of a 22 m long wooden table, into which 72 copper plates are inserted. These plates have holes through which 5000 m of white thread is woven, spreading on to the floor. This is accompanied by 72 shadow drawings in Indian ink on tracing paper.  If the holes correspond to the constellations above Jerusalem, and the length of the thread is the circumference of the Old city of Jerusalem, what is represented by:   a.) The length of the table b.) The number of copper plates/shadow drawings  Images follow.
  • 71.  The European diet became a great deal sweeter in the 18th century as the use of sugar became more widespread. This resulted in more tooth decay, and the evolution of dentistry as a major branch of medicine.  In the early part of the 19th century, rich patients were prepared to pay enormous sums for a good set of dentures. Bone, ivory, porcelain, wood, cloth etc. were all tried but had problems like an unnatural look and early deterioration. However, dentists found a major source to by-pass all these problems and employed scores of people to collect the raw materials needed for these dentures. Their use continued into the 1860s.  So, what was the source? Image follows.
  • 72.  In Nov 2012, paleontologists at the Museo Geologico Giovanni Capellini in Bologna, Italy, discovered a new species of dinosaur named ___________ pachytholus. The creature, which roamed the Earth some 95 million years ago was about 40 feet long, and the skull fossil had a large eye socket with a "distinctive bump on its forehead" likely for head-butting other males in competition for mates.  What was this dinosaur named after?  Image in the next slide.
  • 73.  “It is the first rock album to hit the market legally and people are surprised and pleased to see it has the lyrics, not just the music” excerpt from a 2004 interview with Akbar Safari, a salesman at a Tehran book and record store.  Which album that takes its name from a Marx Brothers film (that was supposed to have begun with each of the Marx Brothers taking turns roaring instead of the MGM Lion)?  What supposedly was the most important reason for it being allowed into the Islamist Republic of Iran, where Western music is strictly censored?
  • 74.  Suveen Mathaudhu, an American materials science professor estimated the density of X to be about 2.13 g/cc (lighter than Aluminium, which has a density of 2.71 g/cc). X is made out of Uru and Mathaudhu attributed its strength to be a result of Uru being a form of metallic Hydrogen.  All these calculations were necessitated by this tweet from Neil deGrasse Tyson.  What is X? Image in the next slide.
  • 75.  “After scandals with the distribution of secret documents by WikiLeaks, the exposes by Edward Snowden, reports about Dmitry Medvedev being listened in on during his visit to the G20 summit in London, it has been decided to alter the existing practice of creating documents”, was the explanation give by the FSO (Federal Guard Service, which is also in charge of protecting President Vladimir Putin) for deciding to spend 486,000 rubles to improve the safety of Kremlin communications.  What did the Russian agency do to avoid the threat of cyberespionage?
  • 76.  Established in 1884, originally there were two with the foci being Bombay and Calcutta. However, the Indian railways, due to a rapid expansion of routes and associated confusion, used a third one with Madras as the focus, primarily due to the observatory based there which ran a state-of-the-art telegraphic service. A consensus was reached in 1906 regarding this issue, but the Bombay and Calcutta foci continued to operate till the mid 20th century. Today, some of the very few enterprises that operate differently from the consensus are based in the North-East.  What are we talking about? What norm is followed by these N-E enterprises?
  • 77.  Harald Geisler is a German typographer who deals with typography projects on Kickstarter. His latest project involves creation of a font that needs a capital of $1,500. With already 6 times that amount raised, he is planning to move to a friend’s apartment in Vienna, which is only 30 min by foot from Berggasse 19, which houses the basis for his font.  What is the font based on? Image follows.
  • 78.  Les Miserables has been running on the West End in London since 1985 and has held the title of the world's longest running musical since Oct 2006.  In May 2009, the Arts Club theatre of Vancouver found a more than double increase in the ticket sales for their version of the musical. This was attributed to an April 2009 phenomenon that was quite appropriately nicknamed after a line from the opening stanza of Ralph Waldo Emerson's “Concord Hymn.”  What phenomenon? What nickname?
  • 79. On what occasion was this special cover released?
  • 80.  Saint Therese of _________ was a French Carmelite nun popularly known as "The Little Flower of Jesus" or simply, "The Little Flower".  She is one of the most popular saints in the history of the church and was referred to as "the greatest saint of modern times“ by Pope Pius X.  What in Kochi is named after her?  (Answer is NOT St. Teresa’s College, which is named after Saint Teresa of Avila) 
  • 81. Theme  Closed, non-exhaustive  9 questions  5 points for individual answers  Point scheme for theme 1-2 - +25 3-4 - +20 5-6 - +15 7-8 - +10 9 - +5  Uniform negative of - 5 throughout, unlimited attempts 
  • 82.  The region pictured and a male first name (example pictured) share the same Greek root that refers to something that happens daily, the Greeks originally using it to describe the relative location of this region.  What? Also, identify either.
  • 83.  On April Fool’s Day in 1878, the Daily Graphic ran an article about a machine called ‘The Food Creator’, that could create food by combining air, water and earth, based on Dalton’s Law of Multiple Proportions and the Law of Isomorphism.  As a result, the subject of this prank started receiving letters asking for the lowest prices and market availability of these machines. The Daily Graphic, inspired by their success, went ahead another step and published an image of the subject on July 9 (image in the next slide).  What originated due to the combined effect of all these events?
  • 84.  The Seven Seals is a phrase in the Book of Revelation that refers to seven symbolic seals that secure the book or scroll seen during the Revelation of Christ. When a seal is opened, a judgment is released or an apocalyptic event occurs.  Opening of the first four seals release The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. The fourth and final horseman rides on a horse that, according to many versions, is green/greenish-yellow in colour.   What are the names of the horseman and his horse? OR What scientific discovery (that also detected the presence of Magnesium for the first time in living tissue)was named after the same root word for the name of the horse? Image follows.
  • 85.  Humphry Osmond was an English psychiatrist who worked extensively on a group of chemical substances derived from the Peyote cactus. His paper on the results from his research into schizophrenia using these chemicals attracted the attention of the man pictured (next slide) who sent him a letter in 1952 expressing interest in putting himself forward as a subject. They met up in May at the man’s residence in Los Angeles, and he was given 400 mg of the substance leading to an experience lasting 8 hrs.  What came out of this experience? What term did Osmond use to refer to these substances? Image follows.
  • 86.  Scene from The Color of Money, the 1986 Martin Scorsese film based on the novel of the same name by Walter Tevis.  Tom Cruise’s response to the question posed to him inspired an American computer programmer named John D. Carmack to do something in 1992. What?  Video removed.  Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZrjSqK7xPLE
  • 87.  Zamir Dhale is an Advocacy Officer at Sense International (SIIndia), the only NGO in the country working for persons with multi-sensory impairment. In 2003, while at his alma mater in Mumbai, he was contacted (along with a few others named Chandrakant, Pradeep, Mary, and Sangeeta Gala) for a particular job that required him to travel to Shimla. No remuneration was accepted by him for the services, as the job itself was viewed as the biggest possible reward by all these individuals. However, some of Dhale’s later comments kicked up controversy and the person who contracted these people was blamed for exploiting them, but this allegation was denied by all other involved.  What was the job for which these people were chosen?
  • 88.  It is a North American architectural style that applied elements from an architectural movement that began in the late 1740s in England to wooden structures built by house-carpenters.  This involved inclusion of pointed arches, steep gables, and towers to traditional American light-frame construction. They were generally simple, but the usage of the scroll saw and mass-produced wood moldings allowed these structures to mimic the elaborate fenestration of the original style.  What is this style called? What is the most famous example of this architectural style?
  • 89.  This is the Immigrant Song by Led Zeppelin, from their third studio album, Led Zeppelin III.  The ‘immigrants’ mentioned in the song are a group of people rowing west in search of new lands. Who?  The fans of an American sports team started a campaign in 2006 to get their team to use this as their fight song. Their efforts were finally answered when the song was played at their kickoff of the 2007 season. Which team?  Audio removed. Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RlNhD0oS5pk
  • 90.  The brainchild of Graham Monaghan, a former club cricketer, it was inspired by similar items in baseball. Covered by enamel, it was supposed to be a cheap alternative for schools, youngsters and developing countries. Monaghan approached a friend of his with this idea in 1979, and the friend agreed to use it in a marketing exercise. The event did not work to plan, and the only good thing that came out of it was that the friend got fired up and ripped apart the antagonists in this chain of events. He also kept a few of these items as souvenirs, with collectors offering him as much as $3000 for a piece.  By what other name, reminiscent of a loosely defined subset of elements, is this marketing stunt known?
  • 91.  The region pictured and a male first name (example pictured) share the same Greek root that refers to something that happens daily, the Greeks originally using it to describe the relative location of this region.  What? Also, identify either.
  • 92.  On April Fool’s Day in 1878, the Daily Graphic ran an article about a machine called ‘The Food Creator’, that could create food by combining air, water and earth, based on Dalton’s Law of Multiple Proportions and the Law of Isomorphism.  As a result, the subject of this prank started receiving letters asking for the lowest prices and market availability of these machines. The Daily Graphic, inspired by their success, went ahead another step and published an image of the subject on July 9 (image in the next slide).  What originated due to the combined effect of all these events?
  • 93.  The Seven Seals is a phrase in the Book of Revelation that refers to seven symbolic seals that secure the book or scroll seen during the Revelation of Christ. When a seal is opened, a judgment is released or an apocalyptic event occurs.  Opening of the first four seals release The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. The fourth and final horseman rides on a horse that, according to many versions, is green/greenish-yellow in colour.   What are the names of the horseman and his horse? OR What scientific discovery (that also detected the presence of Magnesium for the first time in living tissue)was named after the same root word for the name of the horse? Image follows.
  • 94.  Humphry Osmond was an English psychiatrist who worked extensively on a group of chemical substances derived from the Peyote cactus. His paper on the results from his research into schizophrenia using these chemicals attracted the attention of the man pictured (next slide) who sent him a letter in 1952 expressing interest in putting himself forward as a subject. They met up in May at the man’s residence in Los Angeles, and he was given 400 mg of the substance leading to an experience lasting 8 hrs.  What came out of this experience? What term did Osmond use to refer to these substances? Image follows.
  • 95.  Scene from The Color of Money, the 1986 Martin Scorsese film based on the novel of the same name by Walter Tevis.  Tom Cruise’s response to the question posed to him inspired an American computer programmer named John D. Carmack to do something in 1992. What?  Video removed.  Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZrjSqK7xPLE
  • 96.  Zamir Dhale is an Advocacy Officer at Sense International (SIIndia), the only NGO in the country working for persons with multi-sensory impairment. In 2003, while at his alma mater in Mumbai, he was contacted (along with a few others named Chandrakant, Pradeep, Mary, and Sangeeta Gala) for a particular job that required him to travel to Shimla. No remuneration was accepted by him for the services, as the job itself was viewed as the biggest possible reward by all these individuals. However, some of Dhale’s later comments kicked up controversy and the person who contracted these people was blamed for exploiting them, but this allegation was denied by all other involved.  What was the job for which these people were chosen?
  • 97.  It is a North American architectural style that applied elements from an architectural movement that began in the late 1740s in England to wooden structures built by house-carpenters.  This involved inclusion of pointed arches, steep gables, and towers to traditional American light-frame construction. They were generally simple, but the usage of the scroll saw and mass-produced wood moldings allowed these structures to mimic the elaborate fenestration of the original style.  What is this style called? What is the most famous example of this architectural style?
  • 98.  This is the Immigrant Song by Led Zeppelin, from their third studio album, Led Zeppelin III.  The ‘immigrants’ mentioned in the song are a group of people rowing west in search of new lands. Who?  The fans of an American sports team started a campaign in 2006 to get their team to use this as their fight song. Their efforts were finally answered when the song was played at their kickoff of the 2007 season. Which team?  Audio removed. Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RlNhD0oS5pk
  • 99.  The brainchild of Graham Monaghan, a former club cricketer, it was inspired by similar items in baseball. Covered by enamel, it was supposed to be a cheap alternative for schools, youngsters and developing countries. Monaghan approached a friend of his with this idea in 1979, and the friend agreed to use it in a marketing exercise. The event did not work to plan, and the only good thing that came out of it was that the friend got fired up and ripped apart the antagonists in this chain of events. He also kept a few of these items as souvenirs, with collectors offering him as much as $3000 for a piece.  By what other name, reminiscent of a loosely defined subset of elements, is this marketing stunt known?
  • 100. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Anatolia Wizard Death Psychedelic Doom Black Gothic Viking Heavy Metal
  • 101. Name the first air-conditioned movie theatre in Kerala.
  • 102.  Differential scoring  8 questions  1-3 teams - +20 4-6 teams - +15 7-8 teams - +10  Uniform negative of -5 throughout
  • 103.  The Critic is an American animated series that aired on ABC and Fox in 1994-95, revolving around the life of New York film critic Jay Sherman.  In a first season episode titled ‘Marty’s First Date’, Jay explains the various interesting free stuff the film studios send him for reviewing their movies. He goes on to explain that he has a ‘Tootsie’ sock on his right foot.  What does he have on his other foot? Image follows.
  • 104.  It is a Greek word meaning ‘right conduct in one’s social relationships and towards the gods.’ The concept was anthropomorphized as an eponymous daemon (good spirit) of piety, loyalty, duty and filial respect. The word was even used by emperor Ashoka in his edicts as a Greek translation for the central Buddhist concept of ‘dharma’.  The word also forms the root of the name of someone whose exploits in 1966 immediately resulted in the addition of his likeness to the Madame Tussauds collection in London.  Name the word or the person.
  • 105.  Mary Alice Kemery is the author of the first book of its kind to make The New York Times Best Seller list, in 1968. It was followed by another related book in 1978, which also made The New York Times Best Seller list and set an industry record with $2.3 million being paid for the paperback rights.  She assumed her popular name by combining the name of the title character of a famous WW II radio-show and the name of her second husband.  What was her popular name? OR Name either book. Image in the next slide.
  • 106.  This is X speaking about his famous meeting with Y in 1999:  “I thought wearing glasses was offensive and removed them. But, I noticed Y eyeing them, so I asked if he wanted them. He not only nodded, but also put them on and made the wickedest smile. It was a great moment for a lot of reasons, and one of them was, I thought, 'We'll be on the front page of every newspaper.' I don't mean me, but our issues. I knew what a picture of Y in sunglasses was going to do.”  Who are X and Y?
  • 107.  In December 1985, the Library of Congress ceased production of a particular publication, after the Congress withheld $103,000 in funds, the exact amount it cost to print 1,000 copies of the same for the blind. The publication was the first (and one of the 36) in its category published in Braille since 1970 under the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, and none of the other 35 were dropped. This was contested in court and the judge ruled in favour of the blind, adding that the move violated the First Amendment rights by withholding the funds as a ''back door'' method of censorship.  Which publication did the blind fight tooth and nail for?
  • 108.  The Grands Projects of Francois Mitterrand was a 1982 program to provide modern monuments in Paris, symbolizing France’s role in art, politics, and economy at the end of the 20th century. These were essentially eight monumental building projects that, in two decades, transformed the city skyline.  One of these is the Ministry of Finance building located at 1 Boulevard de Bercy. The building covered an area of 225,000 square metres, was 70 m long and extended down to the Seine.  What nickname was given to the building due to its distinct shape? Image follows.
  • 109.  Which organization, in July-August 2013, organized some of its principal ventures in places like Towton, Tewkesbury, St. Albans and Barnet, sites of some of the bloodiest battles in English history, in an attempt to cover 49 years of history in six hours (using 14 people instead of 50,000)?  Image follows.
  • 110.  In most cases, they are museums containing sculptures, plaques and memorabilia associated with the people who are featured. Or, they could be figurative, consisting of a list of names of individuals maintained by an organization or community.  The original name for these is derived from Norse mythology and was first used in the context of building A located on the banks of the Danube, east of Regensburg, Bavaria. The English name was popularized by the gallery B in Bronx, New York, that was completed in 1900 and is a part of the New York University.  Gimme both names. Images in the next 2 slides.

×