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Echoes 2013 - General Open Quiz at IIM-Kozhikode - Finals

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  • 1. Life, the Universe and Everything The General Open QuizZe Finals
  • 2.  6 Rounds Round 1 – Write Bros – 8 questions Round 2 – Clockwise Dry – 16 questions Round 3 – List-It Round 4 – Anticlockwise Dry – 16 questions Round 5 – Theme Round 6 – Differential Scoring
  • 3.  Write Bros Topic – Rivers 8 questions 5 points per correct answer Bonus of 10 for getting all 8
  • 4.  The two closest capital cities in the world are both located on the opposite banks of a lake-like widening (known as Malebo Pool) in lower reaches of a river. Name both cities and the river.
  • 5.  What connects the following songs? - Turn! Turn! Turn! By Pete Seeger/The Byrds - 40 by U2 - The Lord’s Prayer by Janet Mead - A George Frederic Handel composition that was played at the opening of the Camp Nou in Barcelona in 1957 (and coincidentally, is a nickname of a current player) Which 1970 The Melodians’ song made famous by a 1978 cover version (by another band) can one add to this list?
  • 6.  This island has a name that can be translated as "Island of the Bowl" or "Island of the Big Bowl". It has about 4,000 inhabitants, is 2 km long and nearly 200 m wide at its widest point. The island is most famous as the setting of a 1884 work of art. Identify the island/work of art. Image in the next slide.
  • 7.  “The last film that director Kapoor completed before his death in 1988 became a smash hit that heartily reconfirmed, after several lukewarm releases, his cherished epithet of ‘the Great Showman.’ It is an ingenious and epic-scale allegory that synthesizes classical and mythic narrative, soft-core political and social commentary (here condemning the corruption of politicians and capitalists and championing the nascent environmental initiatives of Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi), and audacious display of the female self. Broadly speaking, the narrative recapitulates the Shakuntala story—that first appeared in the epic Mahabharata in the 3rd or 2nd century BC and then was reworked, some 600 years later, by the poet Kalidasa into the most famous of all Sanskrit dramas.” Excerpt from a study by Prof. Philip Lutgendorf of the University of Iowa. What is the subject of discussion here?
  • 8.  Rio da Duvida (“River of Doubt”), then one of the most unexplored and intimidating tributaries of the Amazon, was renamed after X, once he traced its origin and course in a 1913- 14 expedition. This was the first non Amazonian-native party venture of its kind, during which X fell ill from tropical fever and flesh wounds (that worsened due to a bullet lodged in his chest from a failed assassination attempt in 1912 that was never removed). He soldiered on and completed the mission. Identify X, also the former holder of the Guinness World Record for shaking hands (8,513 handshakes in 1907), a record that was later broken in 1977.
  • 9.  This location with over 3,000 inhabitants, had not received the requisite maintenance for over the 30 years. Finally someone was tasked for the same, with the promise of a tenth of the inhabitants as a gift. The task was considered virtually impossible, but it was accomplished easily with the waters of the rivers Alpheus and Pineios. However, the agreement was not honored and eventually resulted in the death of the person who wanted it done. What location? Also, according to one of the versions, what did the person who accomplished the task do in order to celebrate the same?
  • 10.  Pictured is an amphitheater in the Bulfinch Building at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. The location is most famous for (and named after) a 16 Oct 1846 event, the first of its kind, featuring one Mr. William T Morton and his client Edward G Abbott. The event involved Morton demonstrating the benefits of a product he called Letheon (named after River Lethe, one of the five rivers of the underworld, the name itself meaning “forgetfulness”). The demonstration had Abbott reportedly saying - “Feels as if my necks been scratched”. What was the demonstration about? What was this product?
  • 11.  “At that moment I knew, surely and clearly, that I was witnessing perfection. He stood before us, suspended above the earth, free from all its laws like a work of art, and I knew, just as surely and clearly, that life is not a work of art, and that the moment could not last.” These lines can be found at a location X. The quote is from the film version of a semi-autobiographical work Y by Norman Maclean that went on to win the 1993 Academy Award for Best Cinematography and was nominated for two other Oscars. The book and the movie, set around the Blackfoot river, were also instrumental in popularizing the sport of fly fishing. Solve for X and Y.
  • 12.  The two closest capital cities in the world are both located on the opposite banks of a lake-like widening (known as Malebo Pool) in lower reaches of a river. Name both cities and the river.
  • 13.  What connects the following songs? - Turn! Turn! Turn! By Pete Seeger/The Byrds - 40 by U2 - The Lord’s Prayer by Janet Mead - A George Frederic Handel composition that was played at the opening of the Camp Nou in Barcelona in 1957 (and coincidentally, is a nickname of a current player) Which 1970 The Melodians’ song made famous by a 1978 cover version (by another band) can one add to this list?
  • 14.  Turn! Turn! Turn! – The Book of Ecclesiastes 40 – Psalm 40 The Lord’s Prayer - Matthew 6, verse 9-13 Handel’s Messiah – Book of Common Prayer Rivers of Babylon – Psalms 137:1-4 and 19:14
  • 15.  This island has a name that can be translated as "Island of the Bowl" or "Island of the Big Bowl". It has about 4,000 inhabitants, is 2 km long and nearly 200 m wide at its widest point. The island is most famous as the setting of a 1884 work of art. Identify the island/work of art. Image in the next slide.
  • 16.  “The last film that director Kapoor completed before his death in 1988 became a smash hit that heartily reconfirmed, after several lukewarm releases, his cherished epithet of ‘the Great Showman.’ It is an ingenious and epic-scale allegory that synthesizes classical and mythic narrative, soft-core political and social commentary (here condemning the corruption of politicians and capitalists and championing the nascent environmental initiatives of Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi), and audacious display of the female self. Broadly speaking, the narrative recapitulates the Shakuntala story—that first appeared in the epic Mahabharata in the 3rd or 2nd century BC and then was reworked, some 600 years later, by the poet Kalidasa into the most famous of all Sanskrit dramas.” Excerpt from a study by Prof. Philip Lutgendorf of the University of Iowa. What is the subject of discussion here?
  • 17.  Rio da Duvida (“River of Doubt”), then one of the most unexplored and intimidating tributaries of the Amazon, was renamed after X, once he traced its origin and course in a 1913- 14 expedition. This was the first non Amazonian-native party venture of its kind, during which X fell ill from tropical fever and flesh wounds (that worsened due to a bullet lodged in his chest from a failed assassination attempt in 1912 that was never removed). He soldiered on and completed the mission. Identify X, also the former holder of the Guinness World Record for shaking hands (8,513 handshakes in 1907), a record that was later broken in 1977.
  • 18.  This location with over 3,000 inhabitants, had not received the requisite maintenance for over the 30 years. Finally someone was tasked for the same, with the promise of a tenth of the inhabitants as a gift. The task was considered virtually impossible, but it was accomplished easily with the waters of the rivers Alpheus and Pineios. However, the agreement was not honored and eventually resulted in the death of the person who wanted it done. What location? Also, according to one of the versions, what did the person who accomplished the task do in order to celebrate the same?
  • 19.  Pictured is an amphitheater in the Bulfinch Building at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. The location is most famous for(and named after) a 16 Oct 1846 event, the first of its kind, featuring one Mr. William T Morton and his client Edward G Abbott. The event involved Morton demonstrating the benefits of a product he called Letheon (named after River Lethe, one of the five rivers of the underworld, the name itself meaning “forgetfulness”). The demonstration had Abbott reportedly saying - “Feels as if my necks been scratched”. What was the demonstration about? What was this product?
  • 20.  “At that moment I knew, surely and clearly, that I was witnessing perfection. He stood before us, suspended above the earth, free from all its laws like a work of art, and I knew, just as surely and clearly, that life is not a work of art, and that the moment could not last.” These lines can be found at a location X. The quote is from the film version of a semi-autobiographical work Y by Norman Maclean that went on to win the 1993 Academy Award for Best Cinematography and was nominated for two other Oscars. The book and the movie, set around the Blackfoot river, were also instrumental in popularizing the sport of fly fishing. Solve for X and Y.
  • 21.  Dry Round 16 questions Infinite Pounce +10 on the bounce +10, -5 on the pounce
  • 22.  It is the general term given to a facilitation exercise intended to help a group to begin the process of forming themselves into a team. This term is also applied to a group of sailing vessels with a specific capability, for e.g. NS Arktika, the first surface ship to reach the North Pole, on August 17, 1977. What term?
  • 23.  This annual observance begins with its traditional Palo jabon (literally, ham-stick) that involves a greased wooden pole two stories high topped with a delicious-looking ham. One brave soul must climb the slick stick and retrieve the ham in order for the events to officially begin. Which observance, that leaves its venue cleaner than before, thanks to high acidity levels as per one hypothesis?
  • 24.  By the maps that got published as a result, X became at the same time a teacher, in printing a map of the contours of the country - which was rare at least until the Great War - and populist in portraying the country as a hexagon, a country not only amputated from 1903 of its "lost provinces" but also its overseas possessions like the island of _________, never visited in a century and still missing from maps of the X. From a book by academic historians Jean-Luc Boeuf and Yves Leonard who credited X with teaching the natives about the geography of the nation. Identify X.
  • 25.  Screenwriter Barry Morrow met with X in 1984. Drawing inspiration from this, he went on to write a script that won him an Oscar. This resulted in new-found fame for X, who was requested media-appearances. Barry Morrow gave X his Oscar statuette to carry around and show at these appearances. It has since been referred to as the "Most Loved Oscar Statue" as it has been held by more people than any other. Who is X?
  • 26.  Usually, one of the members of an execution firing squad is issued with something known as the ‘conscience round’. No member of the firing squad is told beforehand if he is using this particular round or not. What is the specialty of this round? Why is it issued?
  • 27.  This self-made businessman was the finance minister of Italy from 1925-28. He negotiated and won huge concessions from the U.S. and Great Britain in funding the Italian debts after WW I. He was also instrumental in the stabilization of the value of the Lira. He was forced to resign by Mussolini, but went on establish something, that honors his memory, at the 11-km long sandbar pictured, every year. What did he establish? Which location? How is his memory kept alive?
  • 28.  Studying in a Yeshiva allows for postponement up to 6 months. This can be extended for as long as the person is studying, in installments of 6 months. This has been a subject of much argument between the secular group and the students, with demonstrations asking for involvement of the student communities to share the burden. The 64 year old exemption came to an end on 1 Aug 2012 and, as expected, stirred up a hornet’s nest. What are we talking about?
  • 29.  It looked like a giant, golden cotton bud and Andrew Strauss didn’t really know what to do with it. He decided on a sly peck on the baubled end, not a confident smacker but the kind of shy, uncertain kiss that a schoolboy might try to sneak in behind the bike shed during the first rousing of adolescence. For the first time in the series, the England captain was unsure of himself. So wrote Mike Atherton on his website in Aug 2011. What is the ‘giant, golden cotton bud’ he’s speaking of?
  • 30.  It was the result of a 1931 idea that was compared to something similar, leading to the replacement of individual units with ‘Bakelite’, ‘Amp’ etc. The creator was paid 5 guineas for his idea and was employed on an annual contract till 1960. The idea was pipped by a nose (by the Concorde) to the second spot in ‘the favorite design of the last century’ competition. What was this idea? Also, connect it to the character pictured. Image in the next slide.
  • 31.  For most of his later political career (1940-45), he lived in a mansion that, ironically, he called “Gimle”, after the place in Norse mythology where survivors of the great battle of Ragnarok were to live. An April 1940 The Times article ensured that his name would forever be discussed in quizzing circles. Who? Image in the next slide.
  • 32.  The X were one of the four major ethnic groups into which the Greeks of the ancient period considered themselves divided (along with the Aeolians, Achaeans and Ionians). The X were the last tribe to migrate to Greece, and they are described as real he-men with a very masculine culture. It is regarded that homosexuality entered Greek culture with the arrival of the X. There was even a battalion of homosexual lovers called the Sacred Band in the city of Thebes. This homosexual aspect is also referenced in the name of a character in a 1890 publication. Name the tribe/character.
  • 33.  Considered unglamorous and mocked, it is a culinary practice engaged in by a small subculture in the United States, Southern Canada, the United Kingdom and a few other Western countries. Many practitioners encourage it citing the freshness, organic, and free nature of the meat involved. The practice is even encouraged by PETA who call it ‘Meat Without Murder’. There are even several cafes devoted to this practice in existence. What are we talking about? Image in the next slide.
  • 34.  A 1994 special edition of Der Spiegel commissioned 5 different extrapolations to IT using Germanys best screenwriters. One of them, by famous screenwriter Christof Schlingensief, even turned the scene into a chainsaw massacre. The beginning of one of the extrapolations, by Jürgen Egger :“The bar is filled sparse. The bartender has to supply only three guests: a loner and a pair. The keeper seems to know the couple, he has just told them a little joke. They chuckle about it. LONER (VOICEOVER): Damn shit. Here I am again in this goddamn bar and knocking back a gimlet after another into me. As always. So, what is IT?
  • 35.  X is the art of making wooden staved vessels (casks, barrels, buckets, tubs) bound together with hoops and possessing flat ends or heads. Which sporting venue in India, home to two teams taking part in the national league for the sport, is named after the art?
  • 36.  Pictured is a Turkish steam bath, combining the functional and structural aspects of Anatolian, Roman and central Asian baths. A session here starts with relaxation in the warm room allowing the bather to perspire freely. Bathers may then move to the hot room, perform a full body wash, receive a massage and finally retire to the cooling-room. How are these baths connected to the world of Indian business? Image in the next slide.
  • 37.  Samuel Purchas was a 15-16th century English cleric who published several volumes travelogues. One of his famous works was Purchas, his Pilgrimage, or Relations of the World and Religions Observed in All Ages and Places Discovered, from the Creation to the Present, first written in 1613. The book, among other things, contained writings based on Marco Polo’s 13th century travels. A slight indisposition that lead to the prescription of an anodyne resulted in the events that made this book famous. Explain.
  • 38. The point where he slept off read thus: “In Xanadu did Cublai Can build a stately palace, encompassing sixteen miles of plain ground with a wall, wherein are fertile meadows,pleasant springs, delightful streams, and all sorts of beasts of chase and game, and in the middest thereof a sumptuous house of pleasure.”
  • 39.  List-It There have been 26 recipients of the Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna Award till date. Name all. 2 points per correct answer. Bonus of 8 points for getting all 26. Total of 60 points.
  • 40.  1991-92 – Vishwanathan Anand 1992-93 – Geet Sethi 1994-95 – Cdr Homi D Motivala Lt Cdr PK Garg 1995-96 – Karnam Malleswari 1996-97 – Kunjarani Devi Leander Paes 1997-98 – Sachin Tendulkar 1998-99 – Jyotirmoyee Sikdar 1999-00 – Dhanraj Pillay 2000-01 – P Gopichand 2001-02 – Abhinav Bindra
  • 41.  2002-03 – Anjali Vedpathak Bhagwat KM Beenamol 2003-04 – Anju Bobby George 2004-05 – Col Rajyavardhan Singh Rathore 2005-06 – Pankaj Advani 2006-07 – Manavjit Singh Sandhu 2007-08 – Mahendra Singh Dhoni 2008-09 – MC Mary Kom Vijender Singh Sushil Kumar 2009-10 – Saina Nehwal 2010-11 – Gagan Narang 2011-12 – Sub Maj Vijay Kumar Yogeshwar Dutt
  • 42.  Dry Round 16 questions Infinite Pounce +10 on the Bounce +10, -5 on the Pounce
  • 43.  Once an essential accessory for men, they were originally intended to help Persian soldiers secure their stance to shoot the bow and arrow effectively. They were adopted by the European aristocracy as a result of the diplomatic missions of Persias Shah Abbas I, aimed at forging links with Western Europe to help him defeat his great enemy, the Ottoman Empire. They were especially popular with Louis XIV, who used them to hide his shortcomings. However, with the advent of the Enlightenment movement and the Great Male Renunciation, they totally fell out of favour after the French Revolution. They were re-adopted by pornographers in the early and mid 20th century, and it is this association with pornography that is believed to have led to their re-acceptance by the public, this time by women. What are we talking about?
  • 44.  This subject in religious art features three men dipping their fingers in a vat of ____________ and tasting it. One man reacts with a sour expression, one reacts with a bitter expression, and one reacts with a sweet expression. Each mans expression represents the predominant attitude of what they represent. X saw life as sour, in need of rules to correct the degeneration of people; Y saw life as bitter, dominated by pain and suffering; and Z saw life as fundamentally good in its natural state. What are we talking about? OR FITB. Also identify X, Y and Z.
  • 45. X – Confucianism Y – Buddhism Z – Taoism
  • 46.  They have traditionally been viewed as a symbol of Germany and this is referenced in their usage by cartoonists to ridicule Germany. During World War I, their popularity plummeted because of this association and they were prefixed with the word liberty (by their owners similar to "liberty cabbage" becoming a term for sauerkraut). This association with Germany also contributed to a first-of- a-kind representation in the early 1970s. What are we talking about? Also identify the particular representation in question.
  • 47.  Dante Alighieris Divine Comedy features a person named Sinon in the Tenth Bolgia of the 8th Circle of Hell where along with many others, he is condemned to suffer a burning fever for all eternity. Sinon’s fault was that he was the only person who volunteered to deal with a product of 3 days’ work, a fact that is referenced primarily in Virgil’s Aeneid (and not in the expected source). So, what exactly did Sinon do? OR What was this product?
  • 48.  A part of 11% of the total material and aimed at making visibility easier and simpler, they’ve been around for half a decade, the first one signifying an open-to-the-public alternative to Foo Camp, which is an annual invitation-only participant-driven conference hosted by Tim OReilly. They made their mark locally thanks to the October 2007 California wildfires and internationally as a result of Green Revolution. What are we talking about?
  • 49.  They were symbolic of the good relationship and cooperation between USA and Japan and had been awarded to Mr. Daniel J. Quigley, Mr. John D. Laurey, Mr. H. Vormstein and Lt. Stephen Jurkis among others. They were, however, returned in small pieces to their donors in Tokyo by Lt. Ted Lawson at noon on April 18, 1942. What are we talking about? How were they returned?
  • 50.  “They used to tank cod from Alaska all the way to China. They’d keep them in vats in the ship. By the time the cod reached China, the flesh was mush and tasteless. So this guy came up with the idea that if you put these cods in these big vats, put some ___________ in with them and the __________ will keep the cod agile. And there are those people who are ___________ in life. And they keep you on your toes. They keep you guessing, they keep you thinking, they keep you fresh. And I thank god for the _________ because we would be droll, boring and dull if we didnt have somebody nipping at our fin.” Explanation given in a 2010 documentary about the origin of the name of the documentary. Why/How has this term now entered common parlance recently?
  • 51.  The Burr–Hamilton duel, one of the most famous personal conflicts in American history, was a duel between two prominent American politicians, the former Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton and sitting Vice President Aaron Burr, on July 11, 1804. It was the culmination of long-standing political and personal bitterness that had developed between the two men over the course of several years. Tensions reached a bursting point with Hamiltons journalistic defamation of Burrs character during the 1804 New York gubernatorial race in which Burr was a candidate. In the duel in New Jersey, Burr shot and mortally wounded Hamilton, who passed away the next day. How is this incident the first-in-line in a project that traces its origins back to 1993? Image of the (loading) homepage of the project in the next slide.
  • 52. Video removedLink - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLSsswr6z9Y
  • 53. A phrase derived from the lines shown in the picture is used to describe a ‘penalty’ of sorts in a sport. What phrase? What is the sporting connection?
  • 54.  The actual number of victories required to officially qualify as a X has varied, but is usually considered to be five or more. The man pictured, Y, is the first ever X and Medal of Honor recipient of the US in World War II. His heroics resulted in something named ‘Orchard Field’ being renamed after him. Y had a famous father, whose claim to fame is all thanks to his legal and business collaborations with a client that he met in the 1920s. Identify X and Y. What is Y’s father’s claim to fame? Image in the next slide.
  • 55.  The Burke and Hare murders were a series of murders perpetrated in Edinburgh over a period of ten months in 1828. From their method of killing their victims came the word "burking", meaning to smother and compress the chest of a victim, and a derived meaning, to suppress something quietly. These murders are the subject of extensive media portrayals and popular culture because of the way the bodies were disposed off, with the help of an accomplice (of sorts) named Robert Knox. So, what was their modus operandi?
  • 56. Up the close and down the stair,In the house with Burke and Hare.Burkes the butcher, Hares the thief,Knox the boy who buys the beef.
  • 57.  The flehmen reaction is a physiological gesture seen in many mammals, with the purpose of facilitating the transfer of pheromones and other scents into the vomeronasal organ located in the roof of the mouth. It is primarily an olfactory mechanism for identifying the reproductive state of females of the same species based on pheromones in the females urine or genitals. This phenomenon is offered as the explanation for the specific appearance of something that had its first popular appearance in the mid 1860s. What?
  • 58.  This is the St. Mary Magdalene Church in Pallithura, a fishing Hamlet in Kerala. Sometime in the early 1960s, the church building was taken over by a group of people. The bishops house was converted into the principal working area. The cattle shed nearby became the breeding ground for the first ever outputs by these people. A permanent handing-over ceremony of the building and adjacent land took place in 1963, with the erstwhile church building today serving the role of a museum. What today exists here? Image in the next slide.
  • 59.  Prayag Raj, the son of eminent poet Ram Das Azad, is a veteran Bollywood personality who’s made his mark as an actor, writer, lyricist, composer, director and (struggling) singer. He made his stage debut with Prithvi Theatres and went to make vital contributions to blockbuster films like Phool Bane Angaarey, Saccha Jhutha and Juari (as writer), Jab Jab Phool Khiley (as overall assistant), Kundan, Chor Sipahee, Ponga Pandit and Coolie (as director), Hero Hindustani and Allah-Rakha (as lyricist), Aag, Awaara and Shakespeare-Wallah (as actor). His everlasting fame, however, rests arguably in a 1961 connection with someone who was the amongst the first to use Internet in India (way before VSNL brought it to India) and was the founding chairman of Internet Users Community of India (IUCI). What are we talking about?
  • 60. Video removedLink - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XDH8uzVcRds
  • 61.  Welspun India Ltd. had acquired a leading British brand called Christy, in 2006. This enabled Welspun to exploit a core market that usually has its peak in mid-year. In 2011, the Vapi factory of Welspun produced 92,493 items, while the number rose to 99,500 in 2012. These items come in 2 varieties. The first one had shades of purple and green with lettering in a color called "buttermilk." The second one is done up in new colors each year, the 2012 version being raspberry, purple and buttermilk. What are these coveted keepsakes?
  • 62.  The Voyager Golden Records aboard both Voyager spacecraft, launched in 1977, contain sounds and images selected to portray the diversity of life and culture on Earth, and are intended for any intelligent extraterrestrial life form. The audio section starts with greetings. The first audio section contains a spoken greeting in English from the Secretary General of the UN, Kurt Waldheim. The second audio section contains spoken greetings in 55 languages. The third audio section was special in that it contained greetings sourced from a famous 1967 discovery by American scientist Roger Payne. What language was the greetings in? OR What was this discovery?
  • 63.  Closed theme Non-exhaustive 9 questions 5 points for individual answers Points for the theme 1-2  + 25 3-4  +20 5-6  +15 7-8  +10 9  +5 Uniform negative of minus 5 throughout for wrong attempts at the theme
  • 64.  It is the medical term for an abscess larger than a boil, usually with one or more openings draining pus onto the skin. It supposedly is named after the appearance of fiery red gemstones like garnet. The term is also used today to describe modernist architecture not conforming to its surroundings after a famous 1984 outburst by Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales. What term? Image in the next slide.
  • 65.  In 1997, the owner of this car tried to help the Second Division English football club Exeter City win a crucial end of season game by placing "energy-infused" crystals behind the goals at Exeters ground. However, Exeter lost the game 5–1. He was later appointed co-chairman of the club in 2002, following which club was relegated to the Football Conference in May 2003, where it remained for five years. He has since severed formal ties with the club. Who? Image in the next slide.
  • 66.  Featured is a menu from the 1989 edition of an annual Feb 12 observance by the worldwide scientist/academician community : Mammalia: Minke Whale meat Aves: Smoked Turkey slices Teleostoma: Pickled Herring Bivalvia: Mya from mouth of the Honna River Gastropoda: commercial escargot Malacostraca: commercial shrimp Pteridophyta: commercial fern fiddleheads Monocots: Onions, rice Dicots: Pecans, spinach Fungi: Commercial Agaricus Bacteria: Villi (Finnish Longmilk) What are these called? Why is it organized?
  • 67.  The first ever explanation of this phenomenon was given by Alessandro Volta in 1776. Today, it is generally accepted that it is a result of the oxidation of phosphine (PH3), diphosphane (P2H4), and methane(CH4). The phenomenon also lends its name to a custom that has its origins in Ireland and for which turnips were used initially. What phenomenon/custom? What is used instead of turnips in the modern world?
  • 68.  The Bronx cheer is a noise signifying derision, real or feigned. It is made by placing the tongue between the lips and blowing to produce a sound similar to flatulence. By what other name is this sound known? Where is this second name most famously used in this sense? Image in the next slide.
  • 69.  The ceremony at the Harvard University Memorial Hall includes, as per official pamphlets, “Two grand Paper Airplane Deluges, one at ceremonys beginning, the other at the midpoint.” Its a time-honored tradition to make and throw paper airplanes at the ceremony. What is this ceremony all about? Image in the next slide.
  • 70.  John Steinbeck had a habit of signing letters and books with a tiny drawing of X, accompanied by the Latin phrase ‘ad astra per alia porci’. X was meant to symbolize Steinbeck himself as “earthbound but aspiring…a lumbering soul but trying to fly…(with)…not enough wingspread but plenty of intention.” X please.
  • 71.  Paul Clifford is a 1830 novel that tells the life of Paul Clifford, a man who leads a dual life as both a criminal and an upscale gentleman. The claim to fame of this otherwise rarely read book lies in that it was the first one to use one of the most widely known incipits in English literature. What was this line?
  • 72.  Only twice has a non-English contestant won the UK edition of Celebrity Big Brother. One was Swedish TV personality Ulrika Jonsson in 2009. Who was the second person, who won the 2007 edition?
  • 73.  It is the medical term for an abscess larger than a boil, usually with one or more openings draining pus onto the skin. It supposedly is named after the appearance of fiery red gemstones like garnet. The term is also used today to describe modernist architecture not conforming to its surroundings after a famous 1984 outburst by Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales. What term? Image in the next slide.
  • 74.  In 1997, the owner of this car tried to help the Second Division English football club Exeter City win a crucial end of season game by placing "energy-infused" crystals behind the goals at Exeters ground. However, Exeter lost the game 5–1. He was later appointed co-chairman of the club in 2002, following which club was relegated to the Football Conference in May 2003, where it remained for five years. He has since severed formal ties with the club. Who? Image in the next slide.
  • 75.  Featured is a menu from the 1989 edition of an annual Feb 12 observance by the worldwide scientist/academician community : Mammalia: Minke Whale meat Aves: Smoked Turkey slices Teleostoma: Pickled Herring Bivalvia: Mya from mouth of the Honna River Gastropoda: commercial escargot Malacostraca: commercial shrimp Pteridophyta: commercial fern fiddleheads Monocots: Onions, rice Dicots: Pecans, spinach Fungi: Commercial Agaricus Bacteria: Villi (Finnish Longmilk) What are these called? Why is it organized?
  • 76.  The first ever explanation of this phenomenon was given by Alessandro Volta in 1776. Today, it is generally accepted that it is a result of the oxidation of phosphine (PH3), diphosphane (P2H4), and methane(CH4). The phenomenon also lends its name to a custom that has its origins in Ireland and for which turnips were used initially. What phenomenon/custom? What is used instead of turnips in the modern world?
  • 77.  The Bronx cheer is a noise signifying derision, real or feigned. It is made by placing the tongue between the lips and blowing to produce a sound similar to flatulence. By what other name is this sound known? Where is this second name most famously used in this sense? Image in the next slide.
  • 78.  The ceremony at the Harvard University Memorial Hall includes, as per official pamphlets, “Two grand Paper Airplane Deluges, one at ceremonys beginning, the other at the midpoint.” Its a time-honored tradition to make and throw paper airplanes at the ceremony. What is this ceremony all about? Image in the next slide.
  • 79.  John Steinbeck had a habit of signing letters and books with a tiny drawing of X, accompanied by the Latin phrase ‘ad astra per alia porci’. X was meant to symbolize Steinbeck himself as “earthbound but aspiring…a lumbering soul but trying to fly…(with)…not enough wingspread but plenty of intention.” X please.
  • 80.  Paul Clifford is a 1830 novel that tells the life of Paul Clifford, a man who leads a dual life as both a criminal and an upscale gentleman. The claim to fame of this otherwise rarely read book lies in that it was the first one to use one of the most widely known incipits in English literature. What was this line?
  • 81.  Only twice has a non-English contestant won the UK edition of Celebrity Big Brother. One was Swedish TV personality Ulrika Jonsson in 2009. Who was the second person, who won the 2007 edition?
  • 82.  Carbuncle Cup – Given to the ugliest building in the UK completed in the last 12 months. Bent Spoon Award – Given to the perpetrator of the most preposterous piece of paranormal or pseudoscientific piffle. The name of the award is a reference to the spoon bending of Uri Geller. Darwin Awards – They recognize individuals who have contributed to human evolution by self-selecting themselves out of the gene pool via death or sterilization due to their own actions. Turnip Prize – It satirizes the Tate Gallerys Turner Prize by rewarding deliberately bad modern art. Golden Raspberry Awards – Presented in recognition of the worst in film and precedes the corresponding Academy Awards ceremony by one day.
  • 83.  IgNobel Prize - A parody of the Nobel Prizes and given each year in early October for ten unusual or trivial achievements in scientific research. Pigasus Award – Seeks to expose parapsychological, paranormal or psychic frauds over the previous year. Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest – For composing the worst possible opening sentence to a novel. Big Brother Awards – They are awarded yearly to authorities, companies, organisations, and persons that have been acting particularly and consistently to threaten or violate peoples privacy, or disclosed peoples personal data to third parties.
  • 84.  Differential scoring 8 questions Scoring pattern 1-3 teams - +20 4-6 teams - +15 7-8 teams - +10 Negative of minus 10 for wrong answers
  • 85.  During sports drafts, especially in North American sports, a special room is set aside at the draft sites for invited top prospects to await their selection with their families and agents. Getting an invitation to this area is an honour in-and- of-itself, as only the top 12-16 prospects are invited in an effort to avoid the awkwardness of a player sitting alone, waiting to hear his name called. The name assigned to this place is borrowed from a totally different field. Just name it. Image in the next slide.
  • 86.  It is perceived as fast-flickering black bugs on a cool white background. It is referred to as myrornas krig in Swedish, myrekrig in Danish, hangyak haboruja in Hungarian, and semut bertengkar in Indonesian, all of which translate to “war of the ants” or “ant soccer”. It was also made use of by Neal Stephenson in the title of his third novel that presents the Sumerian language as the programming language for the brainstem, which is supposedly functioning as the BIOS for the human brain. What are we talking about?
  • 87.  It is the modern remnant of one of the two main east-west routes in a city built by Emperor Hadrian and starts just inside the Lions Gate at the Umariya Elementary School. The total distance is approximately 600 metres and has 9 landmarks enroute, with five additional markers at the terminal point. What are we talking about?
  • 88.  He once famously gave a talk on the shapes of stories (which he had covered as part of his thesis topic as a student), the transcript of which was published in its entirety in his almost- memoir A Man Without a Country under a section titled “Here is a lesson in creative writing”. The stories are mapped along the “G-I axis” of Good Fortune and Ill Fortune and the “B-E axis” of Beginning and End. Pictured is an infographic in this regards portraying his opinion of the shape of a popular story. Who? Which story?
  • 89.  It is a unique ecosystem, twice the size of Rhode Island. The health of wild animal species is usually judged by their numbers rather than the conditions of individuals, so the wildlife here is considered healthy. According to all the population counts performed by over the past 27 years, there is enormous animal diversity and abundance. The existing animal populations have multiplied and rare species not seen for centuries have returned, for example lynx, wild boar, wolf, brown bear, bison, Przewalskis horse, white- tailed eagle and eagle owl. This amazing story has been the subject of documentaries on Animal Planet and the BBC and a central theme of the book Wormwood Forest: A Natural History of ___________. Identify the ecosystem/FITB.
  • 90.  We have our tea, and as I’m leaving, the bird dealers tell me that in Dari and Pashtu, the two most important languages in Afghanistan, a new Spanish word has come into use of late. Anything that one perceives as horrible or unbearable is described as ‘______________.’ Excerpt from a 2010 article titled Camping In Kabul, that featured in The Caravan magazine, describing life in the capital city. So, what is the slang for a horrible/unbearable experience in Kabul?
  • 91.  During the development of an embryo, formation of organs is tightly controlled by specific genes. In the case of breasts, this process controls the development of two breasts in humans but this can go awry, resulting in fewer, extra or misplaced breasts or nipples. What did scientists (at the Breakthrough Breast Cancer Centre at the Institute of Cancer Research in UK in 2005) name the gene, which when mutated, triggered the development of extras nipples or breasts in mammals?
  • 92.  The Frankfurt Book Fair is one of the world’s largest book fairs and has a tradition spanning more than 500 years. Since 1976, a guest of honour (author/country), or a focus of interest is named for the fair. India, in 2006, became the first country to be invited to the fair for a second time (first time in 1986). The inaugural address was given by Mahasweta Devi who moved the crowd with a passionate speech. The speech was notable for her emphasis on patriotism and love for the country. How did she express her feelings?
  • 93. Video removedLink - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5wjGc1zGWBc