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TRAVEL 103 session 1

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TRAVEL 103 first session

TRAVEL 103 first session

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  • The transportation industry is composed of different sectors involved in the movement of people and goods across different points within a specific area by air, sea and land including all required and necessary infrastructure such as airports, piers, roads bridges and the like.
  • Air travel made traveling faster and cheaper
  • Most hotels are located near business districts, airports and travel destinationsMotels are usually located along major highways and speedways.
  • Suite Rooms consists of a bedroom, kitchenette, living space and a parlour. Most have small lobbies and no public meeting rooms. Often doesn’t have a restaurant and a bar
  • For resorts, classifications are: sea-view, mountain-view etc.
  • Restaurants: Establishments that include Fast-food, Coffee Shops, Specialty Restaurants, Family Restaurants, cafeterias and full services restaurants (fine dining ones)Travel Food Service: Food operations in hotels and motels, roadside service to automobile travellers and all food service on planes, trains and ships.Institutional Food Service: Companies, hospitals, nursing homes. Not included in the tourism industry
  • Examples are clubs, shopping malls and theme parks.
  • Shopping: involves the retail sector of quality gift and souvenir stores
  • Shopping: involves the retail sector of quality gift and souvenir stores
  • Includes Publishing companies that make the fliers and advertismentsITC service providers electronic mediaMarketing and PR organizations: asists and planning a publicity and sales campaginEvent Organizers: MICEMisc. Services: Essential services for tourism insurance hospital and medical services.

Transcript

  • 1. School of Hospitality Management School of Hospitality ManagementInternational and Domestic TourPlanning, Packaging and Pricing First Semester AY 2012-2013
  • 2. The ProfessorProf. Tito Antonio A. Ofilada, Jr. School of Hospitality Management Education:  MBA (Ongoing)  Ateneo de Manila University Graduate School of Business  BS Tourism (2006)  University of the Philippines- Diliman
  • 3. The Professor Prof. Tito Antonio A. Ofilada, Jr. School of Hospitality Management  Work Experience:  Delta Airlines 2008-2010  Passenger Sales Agent  Customer Service Intern (Summer 2005)  Philippine Airlines
  • 4. The Professor Prof. Tito Antonio A. Ofilada, Jr. School of Hospitality Management  Consultation Hours:  Tuesdays, 8-9am
  • 5. School Mission:- to be a recognized and respected School of Hospitality Management School of Hospitality Managementeducational institution- adhere to the highest international standards- respond to the market needs- by producing globally competitive and highlyprofessional individuals.
  • 6. Core Values:- Perfection School of Hospitality Management School of Hospitality Management- Innovation- Integrity- Concern- Prudence- Unity
  • 7. School of Hospitality Management School of Hospitality ManagementSeal of Treston InternationalCollege
  • 8. School of HospitalityManagement  Aims to develop tomorrow’s hospitality and tourism School of Hospitality Management leaders both in the national and global setting.
  • 9. School of Hospitality Graduatesare:  Service-oriented School of Hospitality Management  Passionate  excellent communicators  Ethical  Well-rounded  Creative
  • 10. Class Rules maximum of 3 cuts or absences per subject. Should you incur absences more than the School of Hospitality Management allowed maximum number, you will be automatically dropped from the subject and will be given an “FA” or Failure due to Absences in your scholastic report. Wear the prescribed college uniform when inside the classroom and school premises
  • 11. Class Rules Electronic gadgets such as but not limited to mobile phones, laptops and i-pads are not School of Hospitality Management allowed inside the classroom and will be confiscated by the instructor if seen being used by students while class is ongoing. Confiscated gadgets may be claimed at the Guidance & Student Affairs Office upon submission of Letter of Explanation from the student’s parent or guardian.
  • 12. Course Description  This course aims to equip the students with School of Hospitality Management skills and knowledge on how to plan, package and price international or domestic tourism products based on client requirements and number of participants in a particular tour program.
  • 13. Course ObjectivesBy the end of the course, the student should be able to: School of Hospitality ManagementCOGNITIVE:1. To describe the different elements that comprise what are needed in to create tour packages.2. Identify the functions and duties of Tour Operators against the duties and functions of Travel Agents.
  • 14. Course ObjectivesAFFECTIVE: School of Hospitality Management1. To answer questions on how to Price domestic and international travel itineraries based on the number of passengers, inclusions and highlights offered in a particular tour package.2. To prepare a marketing proposal for a designed tour package created based on the requirements of the clients.
  • 15. Course ObjectivesPSYCHO-MOTOR: School of Hospitality Management1. Plan and design domestic and international travel itineraries.2. Create and develop domestic and international travel packages composed of: accommodations, transportation, meals, guide services, attractions and other tour highlights in a certain area.3. Design a tour package (domestic or international) using the concepts and ideas learned in this course and present the tour product.
  • 16. Reference School of Hospitality Management  Claravall, B. (2008). Travel and Tour Operations in the Philippines. Manila: Paul So.
  • 17. Grading System School of Hospitality Management Attendance 15% Orals 15% Prelim Grade 30% Quizzes 10% Midterm Grade 30% Class Standing 40% Pre- Final Grade 40% Exam 60% 100% 100%
  • 18. Grading System1.0-1.25 Excellent School of Hospitality Management1.5-1.75 Very Good2.0-2.25 Good2.5-2.75 Satisfactory3.00 Passed5.00 FailedINC IncompleteDRP DroppedFA Failure due to Absences
  • 19. School of Hospitality Management Let’s Begin…
  • 20. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management  What comes into your mind when you hear this term?
  • 21. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management  A composite of industries and entities involved in planning, development marketing, sales, operation and evaluation of destinations, products and services to cater to the needs of travelers.
  • 22. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management  Entities involved in the tourism industry are privately owned or Government operated.  Government entities:  Formulation of Tourism Policies  Provides guidelines for destination development  Regulation of the industry
  • 23. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management  The Private sector is composed of the following:  Transportation Industry  Hospitality Industry  Food and Beverage  The Activities and Attractions industry  The Travel Trade  Other Private Sector Entities
  • 24. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management The Transportation Industry  The Passenger Transport Industry  Composed of Sea, Air and Land.  Comprises all sectors involved in the transportation or movement of people and goods.  Has the most important role in the industry.
  • 25. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management Air Transportation  Involves companies providing scheduled air transport services  Airports, Airstrips and Airfields are integral parts of this sector.  The developments in Aviation has revolutionized travel.
  • 26. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management Sea Travel  One of the oldest forms of transportation  Includes all water transportation operators, and the land facilities required to service these operators.  Sea operations primarily deal with freight and cargo transport.  Cruise ships primarily deal with transporting passengers.
  • 27. The Tourism IndustryLand Transportation  All land transportation entities- Rail and road School of Hospitality Management  Also includes car rental companies.Oil Companies - Includes gas stations scattered across different locations. - Designed to service the motoring public and in some ways, the tourism industry.
  • 28. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management The Lodging Industry  Places that offer accommodation for a fee.  Made up of hotels, resorts, motor hotels, pension houses, dormitories and inns.  Each facility has its own identity, operating cycle, goals and loyal following.
  • 29. The Tourism IndustryThe Lodging Industry can be classified through the type School of Hospitality Management of property: - Hotels: Two or more floors with rooms located along common hallways. Includes services such as: housekeeping, bell service, business centers, recreation facilities, restaurants and bars. - Motels: Less formal than hotels. Offers parking facilities next to the guest rooms. Services often times limited to a swimming pool and restaurant.
  • 30. The Tourism Industry  Suite Hotels: Lodging facilities that offer School of Hospitality Management only suite rooms.  Convention Hotels: provide meeting and banquet facilities for large groups consisting of more than 500 persons.  Other types: Condo-tels, Resorts, Spas and Casino hotels.
  • 31. The Tourism IndustryLodging facilities are given ranks based on School of Hospitality Management their operating standards. - Deluxe, First class, Standard, Economy/Tourist and Budget - For resorts: Triple “AAA” (deluxe) Double “AA” (first class) and “A” (standard) - Room Types: Twin, Double, Triple, Quad or Single Occupancy - Room Categories: Standard, Superior, Deluxe.
  • 32. The Tourism IndustryThe Food and Beverage Industry School of Hospitality Management - All drinking and eating places that serve the public. - This consists of Restaurants, Travel food service and vending and contract institutional food service.
  • 33. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management Form of Service: How food is presented to the guests. - Table Service: A host or hostess seats the guests, servers take orders and deliver these to the table. - Buffet Service: Guests go to the buffet table for food. - Banquet Table Service: Food is transported from a central kitchen in heated carriers and transported near the dining area. - Cafeteria service: Food is dished out unlike in buffet service that is self service. (i.e.. Canteens and food courts)
  • 34. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management Attraction and Activities Industry - Basic terms: - Leisure: Freedom resulting from the cessation of activities, special time free from work or duties. - Recreation: Refreshment of strength and spirit after work and means of diversion.
  • 35. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management Attraction and Activities Industry - Also called: Entertainment, Recreation or Leisure Sector. - All sites, destinations and organizations that offer attractions and provide entertainment.
  • 36. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management Attractions  A physical or cultural feature of a particular place that individual travellers or tourists perceive as capable of meeting one or more of their specific leisure-related needs. Such features may be ambient in nature or they may be specific to a location, such as a theatre performance, a museum or a waterfall. Source: Dictionary of Travel & Tourism Hospitality Terms (Robert Harris & Joy Howard, Melbourne, Hospitality Press, 1996)
  • 37. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management Attractions  Includes natural and developed attractions that drive much of humanity to travel.  Provides the pull to visit a particular destination.
  • 38. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management Attractions can be:  Natural: places that lure travelers to enjoy the natural beauty and the inspiration they provide or;  Man-made
  • 39. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management Activities  Establishments primarily engaged in providing amusement, recreation or entertainment on payment of a fee or admission charge.
  • 40. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management Activities - Establishments primarily engaged in providing amusement, recreation or entertainment on payment of a fee or admission charge. - Examples: Shopping, Leisure, Recreation, Entertainment.
  • 41. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management Activities - Establishments primarily engaged in providing amusement, recreation or entertainment on payment of a fee or admission charge. - Examples: Shopping, Leisure, Recreation, Entertainment.
  • 42. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management Activity: - Give examples of activities under the following categories: - Leisure - Recreation - Entertainment
  • 43. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management The Travel Trade  Made up of travel agents, tour operators, also referred to as intermediaries or middlemen and the tour guides.  The sector that provides the travelling public with advice on destinations to go to and facilitates the reservation or purchase of different travel services.
  • 44. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management Travel Agencies  Can be compared to a department store selling travel needs.  A place or establishment where people can secure information, expert counselling and make arrangements for travel by air, sea or land to any point in the world.
  • 45. The Tourism Industry School of Hospitality Management Tour Operators  Companies that contract and purchase separate travel components and assembles them into one package.  Provides the packages sold by travel agents.
  • 46. The Tourism Industry Travel Agents vs. Tour Operators School of Hospitality Management TRAVEL AGENTS TOUR OPERATORRetailers Wholesalers. Deals with travel agents (retailers)Acts as consultants or advisers Acts as middlemen betweento the traveller. the suppliers and the vendors.Revenues are fixed and pre Have variable but limiteddetermined by suppliers revenues income and profit marginsCharges fees for Sells optional products anddocumentation and ancillary services and makes use ofservices depositsAgents of the Suppliers Capitalize on Cost-savers
  • 47. The Tourism IndustryOther Private Sector Entities School of Hospitality Management  Includes other sectors with indirect involvement in the tourism industry.  Includes the media and other public relations companies that perform tasks of image making.
  • 48. The Philippine TourismIndustry School of Hospitality Management  In the Philippine setting, The tourism industry is a major player in terms of economic growth.  The industry is also composed of both the private and public sectors.
  • 49. The Philippine TourismIndustry School of Hospitality Management The Public Sector in the Philippine Tourism Industry includes the following: - The Department Of tourism - Philippine Convention and Visitors Corporation - Tourism Infrastructure and Enterprise Zone Authority - Local Government Units
  • 50. School of Hospitality Management Thank you!