Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Arch presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Arch presentation

115

Published on

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
115
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Results of our Archaeology Project Mr. Spedding Grades 2/3 Class
  • 2. Our class culture The Guala People
  • 3. The Guala culture arrived in Carmel Valley during the last ice age
  • 4. The Guala culture arrived in Carmel Valley during the last ice age is the oldest tribe yet to be discovered in California
  • 5. The Guala culture arrived in Carmel Valley during the last ice age is the oldest tribe yet to be discovered in California hunted large and small animals, including rabbits, deer, birds, fish, and even mammoth elephants
  • 6. The Guala culture arrived in Carmel Valley during the last ice age is the oldest tribe yet to be discovered in California hunted large and small animals, including rabbits, deer, birds, fish, and even mammoth elephants believed in an afterlife
  • 7. The Guala culture arrived in Carmel Valley during the last ice age is the oldest tribe yet to be discovered in California hunted large and small animals, including rabbits, deer, birds, fish, and even mammoth elephants believed in an afterlife important people were cremated and buried in a stone sarcophagus with their most valued possessions
  • 8. The Guala culture arrived in Carmel Valley during the last ice age is the oldest tribe yet to be discovered in California hunted large and small animals, including rabbits, deer, birds, fish, and even mammoth elephants believed in an afterlife important people were cremated and buried in a stone sarcophagus with their most valued possessions worshipped different spirits, represented by clay statues
  • 9. The Guala culture hunted with spears and arrows
  • 10. The Guala culture hunted with spears and arrows traded with other tribes for obsidian, shellfish, and other things
  • 11. The Guala culture hunted with spears and arrows traded with other tribes for obsidian, shellfish, and other things graves were surrounded with blue and purple powder (representing grief and hope); arrows were placed on the graves to protect the dead from evil spirits
  • 12. The Guala culture hunted with spears and arrows traded with other tribes for obsidian, shellfish, and other things graves were surrounded with blue and purple powder (representing grief and hope); arrows were placed on the graves to protect the dead from evil spirits shamans cured disease with crystals, plant medicines, musical instruments, and special tools for taking out evil spirits
  • 13. Three areas of Guala Village The hearth area The burial site The shaman’s area
  • 14. The hearth area
  • 15. The hearth area
  • 16. The burial site
  • 17. The burial site
  • 18. The burial site
  • 19. The burial site
  • 20. The shaman’s area
  • 21. The shaman’s area
  • 22. The shaman’s area
  • 23. The shaman’s area
  • 24. The shaman’s area
  • 25. Questions?
  • 26. The Excavation of Ms. Diamond’s class site
  • 27. The Excavation: What we discovered
  • 28. The Excavation: What we discovered
  • 29. The Excavation: What we discovered
  • 30. The Excavation: What we discovered
  • 31. The Excavation: What we discovered
  • 32. The Excavation: What we discovered
  • 33. Thoughts about this culture The culture has many things in common with ancient Egypt There are statues of a Sphinx, pyramids, and each had Egyptian hieroglyphics carved on them Art in squares 6 and 9 had pictures of pyramids Square 2 had Egyptian hieroglyphics There’s a lot of gold, like we’ve seen from ancient Egyptian burial sites There are three mummies on the site
  • 34. Thoughts about this culture The clay object in square 8 is shaped like an ankh, an Egyptian symbol of life This is a wealthy culture from the amount of gold and jewels, like rings, gems, necklace and beads The sarcophagus in square 5 is filled with jewels and coins The piece of slate in square 2 seems to have the word pyramid written on it There are two staffs in square 3 One looks like an Egyptian heqa crook, and the other looks like a was scepter
  • 35. Questions we have Is square 7 a cooking and eating area (with baskets and eating utensils)? What is the meaning of the leaves in square 3? Is the mummy in square 4 a wolf, a cat? We’re puzzled by the candlestick in square 5? What is it’s meaning? Do the day glow beads have special meaning? What about the writing in English on the statue in square 2? What’s the story behind that? There is a spoon of unusual shape in square 7/ What is it used for?
  • 36. Questions we have What are the triangular clay objects in square 7? Why are there bricks? Do they show the shape of a burial site? (We see no evidence of a hearth or living area) What are the teeth about (in squares 2 and 5)? What is the meaning of the cloth in square 8? Is it a piece of clothing? Why is there a bracelet in the ankh object in square 8? What’s up with the Hello Kitty necklace?
  • 37. Our conclusions This site was probably a burial area. Single bricks surround the site, and a sarcophagus is in the center The sarcophagus was filled with fancy stuff, as if the mummy buried there was a very important person or animal The culture had close ties to the ancient Egyptians We believe the slate in square 2 may have been a map We know that the ancient Egyptians made animal mummies of special pets, and animals connected with their gods. We wonder if the mummies are of important animals.
  • 38. Questions?
  • 39. Mr. Spedding wishes that acknowledge the following students for their special contribution to this project:
  • 40. Mr. Spedding wishes that acknowledge the following students for their special contribution to this project: Alexis Olmo, coordinator of the hearth area Riley Gaucher and Neeli Tummala, coordinators of the shaman and religious area Daniel Kanak, coordinator of the tools’ group Zoe Deoudes and Riley Gaucher, inventors of the Guala language Omar Alladeen, coordinator of the burial site Izzie Leahy, jewelry maker extraordinaire
  • 41. Mr. Spedding wishes that acknowledge the following students for their special contribution to this project: Preston Evers and Reeve Grobecker, our SITE MANAGERS!!

×