Articles of confederation

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  • Students should conclude that there are thirteen stars representing the thirteen states. People are happy because they gained their independence from Great Britain under George III.
  • Although the Articles of Confederation were written in 1776, the finalized document for ratification occurred in 1781.

Transcript

  • 1. Articles of Confederation1781-1789©2012, TESCCC Grade 08, Unit 04 Lesson 01
  • 2. Yay!We arefree!©2012, TESCCC
  • 3. • Loose • Describe the oppositeof a confederation.• Why did the colonistsprefer a weak centralgovernment insteadof a strong centralgovernment?Confederation: Central government has limitedpower and the states hold most of the power©2012, TESCCC
  • 4. ColonistsColonistsvs.Great BritainAmericanRevolutionSelf-GovernanceIndependentArticlesofConfederationU.S.Constitution©2012, TESCCC
  • 5. Who should have more power?The states or the national/centralgovernment?A dilemma our country still struggles with eventoday©2012, TESCCC
  • 6. Articles of Confederation1781-1789Can you predict what replaced the Articles ofConfederation?Why did it need to be replaced?Second Continental Congress©2012, TESCCC
  • 7. Articles of Confederation: Strengths• Wage war• Issue money• Sign treaties (make peace)• Set up post offices• Appoint ambassadors• Settle conflicts between states©2012, TESCCC
  • 8. Articles of Confederation:Weaknesses• No President (Executive)• No national army only state militias• No national/federal court• No power to enforce laws (regulate trade)• No power to tax• States were sovereign• One vote per state regardless of the statepopulation• 9/13 states to pass a law• 13/13 states to amend (make changes)©2012, TESCCC