THE “BLOODY SHIRT” ELECTS GRANT
Why was there disillusionment amongst
Americans in the era following the Civil
War?
In the...
THE ERA of GOOD STEALINGS
(THE NADIR OF NATIONAL DISGRACE)
Link the Civil War era to the extravagance,
speculation, waste,...
Cartoonist Thomas Nast relentlessly
attacked the perpetrators of
corruption, as big business began to
dominate government ...
In the face of growing public discontent with
their influence, political “boss’” attempted to
rationalize their tactics as...
Explain and/or describe the following incidents of
corruption that marked the post-war era:
1. “Jubilee Jim” Fisk & Jay Go...
Grant’s Administration was thus marred by
corruption and scandal. His entire cabinet
proved a disgrace except for Secretar...
Ultimately, what was Grant’s accountability to the corruption? Would the outcome
have been different in today’s political ...
During Grant’s years as President, a
great many of his top advisors and
other govt. officials took bribes &
kickbacks, and...
THE LIBERAL REPUBLICAN REVOLT of 1872
By 1872, even many Republicans were disgusted
with Grant. “Turn the rascals out” bec...
DEPRESSION, DEFLATION, and INFLATION
Grant’s woes deepened in the paralyzing economic panic that broke in 1873. What
facto...
CURRENCY ISSUE
Debtors (especially farmers) demand “soft” currency
(silver) and/or greenbacks, which creates an
inflationa...
PALLID POLITICS of the GILDED AGE
The Gilded Age was a term coined by Mark Twain. It was marked by the fact that there
was...
The Republican Party splits into two factions:
1. Stalwarts – supported patronage, led by Roscoe Conkling
2. Half-Breeds –...
A.p. ch 23 p.p (pt. 1)
A.p. ch 23 p.p (pt. 1)
A.p. ch 23 p.p (pt. 1)
A.p. ch 23 p.p (pt. 1)
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A.p. ch 23 p.p (pt. 1)

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A.p. ch 23 p.p (pt. 1)

  1. 1. THE “BLOODY SHIRT” ELECTS GRANT Why was there disillusionment amongst Americans in the era following the Civil War? In the presidential election of 1868, Union war hero, Ulysses S. Grant defeated Democratic challenger, Horatio Seymour, in an electoral landslide (214-80) despite a close popular vote (3,013,421 to 2,706,829). For the Republicans, what proved to be the decisive factor for their victory?
  2. 2. THE ERA of GOOD STEALINGS (THE NADIR OF NATIONAL DISGRACE) Link the Civil War era to the extravagance, speculation, waste, and graft. Cynics defined an honest politician as one who, when bought, would stay bought. The infamous Tweed Ring in New York City vividly displayed the ethics (or lack of ethics) typical of the age. Explain William “Boss” Tweed’s tactics. Who brought Tweed to task? Tweed was eventually convicted of fraud and died in prison.
  3. 3. Cartoonist Thomas Nast relentlessly attacked the perpetrators of corruption, as big business began to dominate government by politicians. Thomas Nast
  4. 4. In the face of growing public discontent with their influence, political “boss’” attempted to rationalize their tactics as “seizing opportunities.”
  5. 5. Explain and/or describe the following incidents of corruption that marked the post-war era: 1. “Jubilee Jim” Fisk & Jay Gould 2. Credit Mobilier 3. The Whiskey Ring Jim Fisk Jay Gould
  6. 6. Grant’s Administration was thus marred by corruption and scandal. His entire cabinet proved a disgrace except for Secretary of State Hamilton Fish. President Grant proved susceptible to office- seekers and in-laws; he could be easily “bought” with a simple gift from unscrupulous office- seekers. Describe Grant’s reaction to the corruption swirling around his administration.
  7. 7. Ultimately, what was Grant’s accountability to the corruption? Would the outcome have been different in today’s political climate?
  8. 8. During Grant’s years as President, a great many of his top advisors and other govt. officials took bribes & kickbacks, and did other things to get money illegally. What changes in the country do you think made such illegal activity more common in the govt. in those years? This cartoon shows Grant as Gulliver. A tiny man is telling Grant that many people want to see him punished. That tiny man ran against Grant in the presidential election of 1872. Can you name him? What point about Grant and his critics is this cartoon trying to make? Do you agree with that point? Why or why not?
  9. 9. THE LIBERAL REPUBLICAN REVOLT of 1872 By 1872, even many Republicans were disgusted with Grant. “Turn the rascals out” became their slogan urging reform. What were their twin goals? The Liberal Republicans muffed their chance by nominating the brilliant, but erratic, Horace Greeley. Provide his profile. Democrats continued to lose political credibility when they endorsed Greeley, who had labeled Democrats as “slave-whippers” and “idiots.” The Republicans nominated incumbent, President Grant. The campaign was marked by mud-slinging and the voters were presented with two poor candidates – why? Were the Liberal Republicans successful? Explain.
  10. 10. DEPRESSION, DEFLATION, and INFLATION Grant’s woes deepened in the paralyzing economic panic that broke in 1873. What factors led to depression in the post-war years? Boom times became gloom times as more than 15,000 businesses went bankrupt. Black Americans were especially hard hit. Hard times inflicted the worst punishment on debtors, who intensified their clamor for inflationary policies (wanted more money in circulation). Explain their rationale. Creditors, of course, advocated precisely the opposite. Which group did Grant’s economic policies benefit? Explain the Resumption Act. What is meant by “The Crime of ’73?” In 1878 the Bland-Allison Act put more money in circulation by having the Treasury print $2 to $4 billion of silver money each month. Explain the phenomenon of the Greenback Labor Party.
  11. 11. CURRENCY ISSUE Debtors (especially farmers) demand “soft” currency (silver) and/or greenbacks, which creates an inflationary effect (more, less valuable money chasing products causes prices to rise.) Ex: If the debtor borrowed $100 in hard currency and pays back the loan in silver currency, he pays only $75 of $100 borrowed. If the debtor borrowed $100 in hard currency and pays back the loan in greenbacks, he pays only $50 of $100 borrowed. + Prices rise; interest rates drop (more money to borrow.) Creditors (especially banks) demand “hard” currency (gold), which creates a deflationary effect (less, more valuable money circulating). They demand payment on loans in hard currency. Ex: A creditor lends $100 in hard currency and the debtor pays back loan in silver, which equals only $75 of the loan. A creditor lends $100 in hard currency and the debtor pays back loan in greenbacks, which equals only $50. + Financial stability (promotes foreign & domestic investment. - Interest rates rise (smaller money supply).
  12. 12. PALLID POLITICS of the GILDED AGE The Gilded Age was a term coined by Mark Twain. It was marked by the fact that there was little difference between the political parties. The period saw little party differences on platforms. And ethnic/sectional rivalries were clearly evident. Identify & describe the Democratic and Republican strongholds and weaknesses.
  13. 13. The Republican Party splits into two factions: 1. Stalwarts – supported patronage, led by Roscoe Conkling 2. Half-Breeds – supported mild reform, led by James Blaine These factions offered little difference in opinions and successfully checked each other’s ambitions. Roscoe Conkling James Blaine

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