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Cybercrime - View and perceptions from EU citizens

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With the growth of internet usage, cyber crime is going to become a real threat for cityzens. TNS has carried on a survey for the European Commission, Special Eurobarometer - March 2012, 27 Countries …

With the growth of internet usage, cyber crime is going to become a real threat for cityzens. TNS has carried on a survey for the European Commission, Special Eurobarometer - March 2012, 27 Countries surveyed, to understand perceptions on this increasing big issues.

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  • My name is Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D. C.F.C. and I’m a NYS licensed psychologist, certified forensic consultant and author of the new Information Age Forensics construct called iPredator. I’m writing to say “Thank You.” Your post was sent to me via Google Alerts and I want to compliment you on your informative information. I’m a cyberbullying, cyberstalking, online sexual predation, internet addiction & cybercriminal psychology educator & consultant. If I can ever be of help, feel free to write or call me anytime at 347-871-2416. Lastly, thank you for taking the time to educate online users about the rapidly growing dangerous elements of the Information Age.
    Regards,
    Michael Nuccitelli Psy.D., C.F.C.
    NYS Licensed Psychologist
    CEO, iPredator Inc.
    Website: www.iPredator.co
    Email: drnucc@ipredatorinc.com
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  • 1. Cyber crime
  • 2. © 2012 TNS2 3Cyber crime Introduction Cyber crime costs the UK an estimated £27bn per year, of which £3.1bn affects the population directly. The remainder: mostly IP theft, industrial espionage and extortion, is a cost to business. The Government too is not immune, tax and benefit fraud is an issue. The cost of financial losses and time puts cyber crime far ahead of narcotics in the worldwide criminal industry league. Cyber crime will increase. Growth of online commerce creates more opportunity for thieves, for whom cyber crime is low risk and high reward. Penetration of smartphones is increasing rapidly and we are on the cusp of a boom in m-commerce. Criminals have begun to target mobile phones, and we can expect these to become a focus of future attacks. Britons are confident using the internet and, relative to most EU countries, we are comfortable buying goods and services online. We are aware of cyber crime and concerned that it may affect us. Most of us will know someone who has been affected. But despite this we remain blasé about online security. Eurobarometer research – the research was conducted by TNS Opinion & Social across the 27 EU member states in March 2012. 26,593 face-to-face at home interviews were conducted.
  • 3. © 2012 TNS4 5Cyber crime Growth in online transactions is receiving a boost from m-commerce. According to IMRG CapGemini, m-commerce is currently growing at 320% per annum (Jan-May 2012). The UK’s high penetration of smartphones is helping drive retail business. *Eurobarometer Cyber Security report July 2012 / TNS Opinion Social. Base: all adults online The UK has embraced online UK consumers have embraced online. A 2012 Eurobarometer study by TNS Opinion Social shows that 78% of UK adults use the internet and 63% of all adults use it several times a day. It is a place to shop, socialise and bank – as well as read the news and play games. Online activities UK % Email Buying Banking SellingSocial network Buy goods services online Eurobarometer Cyber Security report July 2012 / TNS Opinion Social. Base: all adults online 74% of adults Britons use the internet more than other EU countries, particularly for buying goods and services. This translates into online sales. IMRG CapGemini estimates that 17% of UK retail sales are online. Online sales are expected to increase to £77bn this year, up 14%. As we become more comfortable shopping online we can expect this area to grow strongly for the foreseeable future. Smartphone internet access* 42% of adults 24% of adults UK EU Online retail sales UK £bn 2011 2012 (estimated)2010 59 68 77 50 55 75 70 65 60 IMRG CapGemini eRetail Sales Index UK 53% of adults EU 86 74 57 55 24
  • 4. © 2012 TNS6 7Cyber crime Are we too confident? EU UK 51% 71% 68% 27% 45% 44% Confidence levels are even higher for those using tablets and smartphones to access the internet, reflecting greater confidence and competence amongst early(ish) adopters of new technologies. Eurobarometer Cyber Security report July 2012 / TNS Opinion Social. Base: all adults online Unsurprisingly, there is a strong correlation at the country level between feeling confident online, awareness of cyber crime and using online services. Britons are ahead of many of their European counterparts in terms of confidence online. Confident in my ability to use the internet for things like online banking or buying things online (%) 82 69 38 58 EU UK EU UK Feel well informed about the risks of cyber crime 51 35 23 20 11 9 UK Netherlands Germany France Italy Spain Very confident in my ability to use the internet for things like online banking or buying things online (%) Eurobarometer Cyber Security report July 2012 / TNS Opinion Social. Base: all adults online Confidence remains high even when compared to other large developed economies. ‘Very confident’ in my ability to use the internet for things like online banking or buying things online Any device (inc. desktop / laptop / netbook) Tablets Smartphones
  • 5. © 2012 TNS8 9Cyber crime 49% 51%Have not installed anti-virus software Don’t use different passwords for different sites EU UK Our confidence may be misplaced. We are somewhat blasé about our online security. Open emails from people I don’t know 57% 62% 75% 69% Haven’t changed online banking password in last 12 months. 81% 70% Contrast actual consumer behaviour – most of us don’t use different passwords for different sites – with the best practice advice from Symantec, the online security company, who recommend that passwords are a mix of letters and numbers and should be changed often. Symantec suggest passwords do not consist of words from the dictionary and that the same passwords shouldn’t be used for multiple applications or websites. Instead complex passwords (upper/lowercase and punctuation) or passphrases are to be used. Source: Internet security and threats report, Symantec April 2012 Eurobarometer Cyber Security report July 2012 / TNS Opinion Social. Base: all EU adults online / UK adults online Our confidence is misplaced 75% 66% 65% 69% Our false sense of security appears to stem from inertia or fatalism, rather than a lack of awareness or indifference to the risk of online crime. Inertia not indifference Agree the risk of becoming a victim of cyber crime has increased in the past year Concerned that online information is not kept secure by public authorities Believe risk of becoming a victim of cyber crime has increased in the past year Concerned that online information is not kept secure by web sites Eurobarometer Cyber Security report July 2012 / TNS Opinion Social. Base: all UK adults online
  • 6. © 2012 TNS10 11Cyber crime Thieves follow the money Received fraudulent emails asking for money / bank or payment details Identity theft: stealing personal data and shopping under your name Online fraud where goods purchased were not delivered or counterfeit Misplaced confidence matters because cyber crime is not just something that happens to other people. Many of us are unwitting participants in criminal activity. A recent study by Professor van Eeten of Delft University of Technology estimated that over 1 million UK computers play host to botnets, sending out millions of spam messages. Cybercriminals have opened a new front in their battle to infect computers with malware - PC production lines.* Microsoft discovered four factory fresh PCs that were pre-infected with malware. The criminals behind the malicious program had exploited insecure supply chains to get viruses installed in counterfeit software some Chinese PC makers were installing on computers as they were being built. Nitol was the most pernicious of the viruses Microsoft caught because, as soon as the computer was turned on, it tried to contact the command and control system set up by Nitol’s makers to steal personal details to help criminals plunder online bank accounts. Use any device to connect to internet Use smartphones to connect to internet In particular, we are concerned over security of online payments and the misuse of our personal data. Those using a smartphone to access the internet are no more concerned, even though it would be unusual for a smartphone to have the same level of security as a PC. Eurobarometer Cyber Security report July 2012 / TNS Opinion Social. Base: all UK adults online Concerned about security of payments online Concerned about misuse of personal data UK 56% 43% EU 38% 40% Concerned about security of payments online Concerned about misuse of personal data UK 55% 40% EU 42% 43% 12% 16% 52% *Source bbc.co.uk 13 September 2012 / Eurobarometer
  • 7. © 2012 TNS12 13Cyber crime M-commerce is about to accelerate rapidly, helped by NFC technology that turns phones into mobile wallets and by the imminent arrival of 4G, which will bring online broadband speeds to your smartphone. A recent prediction sees m-commerce growing fourteen-fold across the next 9 years to reach £20bn. The take-off of m-commerce will require a greater degree of security. But first the consumer will need to be educated, and probably pushed. Even amongst smartphone owners who are relatively sophisticated users of the internet and more aware of cyber crime, security remains poor. Most people do not change their password regularly on sites where they are entering financially sensitive data. There is little public awareness of the threat to smartphones and few people install security. 21% 37% Online shopping Smartphone users who changed their password to online services in last 12 months Online banking 31% 43% EU UK 2011 2016 2021 0 5 10 15 20 1.35 5.82 19.26 Smartphones are the next target Cyber criminals are already targeting mobile phones, principally with a Trojan virus that sends SMS messages from phones to a premium number. But it is getting more serious and always-on, internet-connected smartphones are a ripe target. In December 2011 alone, Kaspersky Labs (online security company) discovered 1000 new Trojans targeting smartphones; more smartphone viruses than were picked up in the previous 8 years. Kaspersky sees the threat to smartphones escalating rapidly. The attraction is obvious. A further 28% are interested in using their mobile for banking 31% Already use their mobile for banking Over half of UK mobile phone owners have a smartphone and penetration is increasing as prices continue to fall. Smartphones are increasingly used for commercial transactions. 31% of mobile phone users use their phone for mobile banking and a further 28% say they would be interested in doing so. Although shopping via a mobile has yet to fully take off, there is a strong supplier push from financial institutions and a handful of retailers eager to develop the market. Source: TNS Mobile Life 2012 / TNS Opinion Social Base: mobile users / UK Source: Ebay submission to Ofcom 2011 Eurobarometer Cyber Security report July 2012 / TNS Opinion Social. Base: all adults online EU UK UK m-commerce growth £bn
  • 8. © 2012 TNS14 15Cyber crime The cost to business It is principally larger companies that will be targeted by cyber crime. The type of business determines the nature of the vulnerability. IP theft will be an issue for companies with a substantial scientific input: Pharmaceutical, Engineering and Defence companies for example. Theft of customer data is a risk for utility companies and financial services companies. Even for companies with a less obvious vulnerability there may be the threat of counterfeiting or extortion based on denial of service attacks or threat of disclosure of stolen data. In a 2011 report issued by the Cabinet Office*, it was estimated that cyber crime costs the UK £27bn each year. Most of this cost falls on business from the theft of IP, which is estimated at £9.2bn per annum and from industrial espionage £7.6bn. There are also costs for Government through money laundering and attacks on the benefit system and for the public who, it is estimated, lose £3.1bn per annum to cyber crime. Worldwide the cost of cyber crime in terms of financial losses and time has been estimated at £240bn per annum (source: Symantec). The consumer cost Every day inboxes fill with millions of fraudulent emails inviting us to click on a toxic link or offering us millions won in an overseas lottery. Clearly not everyone finds the dishonesty transparent. This is low risk, high reward criminality. At the more sophisticated end, an Essex based gang was prosecuted for stealing log- in details from 600 UK bank accounts using Zeus Trojan malware to exploit weak security on individuals’ computers. They were making £2m a month – and it was all coordinated from a single laptop. Identity theft £1.7bn Online fraud £1.4bn Scareware and fake anti-virus £30m The Cabinet Office report puts a cost to this: Cyber crime: consumer economic impact* The cost of cyber crime to the UK is £27bn *The cost of Cyber crime, 2011 (to the UK) – a report by Deltica and the Office of Cyber Security on behalf of the Cabinet Office Total £3.1bn
  • 9. © 2012 TNS16 17Cyber crime At its most sophisticated, the cyber criminals may be agencies of foreign governments seeking political, economic or military advantage. A recent example is the stuxnet worm that allows the perpetrator to control the operation of another country’s infrastructure. Large organised crime may be involved in money laundering or insider dealing on stolen information on forthcoming MA deals. Inevitably some rogue companies will be involved in IP theft – although quite possibly through a third party. There are also innumerable opportunistic criminals targeting citizens and companies with small scams, identity fraud, customer data theft and extortion. The Cabinet Office report into cyber crime predicts that cyber crime will grow because it is a low risk criminal activity with high rewards and no physical assets to sell on. Targeted attacks on businesses are common. While 42% of the mailboxes targeted for attack are high-level executives, senior managers and people in RD, the majority of targets were people without direct access to confidential information. For example, people in HR who are used to getting email attachments such as CVs from strangers. Source: Internet security threat report, Symantec April 2012 Who are the cyber criminals? £ 198.205.156.154 £ 2 4 5 4 3 5 4 8 9 4 3 5 4 5 4 4 3 4 5 3 4 £ 198.205.156.154 £ 2 4 5 4 3 5 4 8 9 4 3 5 4 5 4 4 3 4 5 3 4 £ 198.205.156.154 £ 2 4 5 4 3 5 4 8 9 4 3 5 4 5 4 4 3 4 5 3 4 £ 198.205.156.154 £ 2 4 5 4 3 5 4 8 9 4 3 5 4 5 4 4 3 4 5 3 4 £ 198.205.156.154 £ 2 4 5 4 3 5 4 8 9 4 3 5 4 5 4 4 3 4 5 3 4 The Cabinet Office report puts a cost to this: Cyber crime: cost to UK business* * The cost of Cyber crime, 2011 (to the UK) – a report by Deltica and the Office of Cyber Security on behalf of the Cabinet Office Risks are not going away. Social networking creates greater connectivity, which makes it easier to spread malware. The blurring of home and office can also lead to problems every time a worker uses a home laptop at work or brings the office laptop home for their own activities. IP theft £9.2bn Industrial espionage £7.6bn Extortion £2.2bn Total £21bn Direct online theft £1.3bn Loss or theft of customer data £1bn Case study In 2011, 29 chemical companies were targeted with emails that appeared to be meeting invitations from known suppliers. These emails installed a backdoor trojan intent on stealing intellectual property such as designs and formulae. Source: Internet security threat report, Symantec April 2012
  • 10. © 2012 TNS18 19Cyber crime How TNS can help Cybercrime is a fast-growing and evolving economy with a turnover on a par with Denmark. Experience tells us that, for the most part, consumers’ response to this mutating threat will be neither uniform nor timely. This most obviously affects manufacturers of smartphones and pcs, banks and credit card companies. But it also impacts on any company involved in online commerce and that includes most retailers and much of the service sector. Companies’ own interests will benefit from improving consumers’ online confidence and security, whether that is through the sale of cyber-secure smartphones or increasing awareness of fraudulent emails and malware. With a presence in over 80 countries, TNS has more conversations with the world’s consumers than anyone else and understands individual human behaviours and attitudes across every cultural, economic and political region of the world. Our breadth and depth of resource around the world means that TNS has the expertise to help businesses understand the diversity of consumers’ online behaviour and attitudes to cybercrime. Eurobarometer research – the research was conducted by TNS Opinion Social across the 27 EU member states in March 2012. 26,593 face-to-face at home interviews were conducted.
  • 11. TNS 6 More London Place London SE1 2QY United Kingdom t +44 (0)20 7656 5294 www.tnsglobal.com Twitter: @tns_uk About TNS UK TNS UK are part of TNS Global, the world’s biggest research company. TNS delivers precise plans to help our clients grow. Whatever your challenge TNS UK can help: n Innovation Product Development n Brand Communications n Retail Shopper n Stakeholder Management n Qualitative n Automotive About Eurobarometer TNS Opinion Social, conducts approximately eight Eurobarometer surveys a year, on behalf of the European Commission. These surveys cover the population of the respective nationalities of the European Union Member States, resident in each of the Member States and aged 15 years and over. Certain waves of research also involve surveys conducted in the six candidate countries (Croatia, Turkey, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Iceland, Montenegro and Serbia), the Turkish Cypriot Community, and Norway. A representative sample of 1.000 people is interviewed in each country (1500 in Germany; 1300 in the UK; 500 in Luxembourg, the Republic of Cyprus, the Turkish Cypriot Community, Iceland and Malta). In this series: n Cyber crime n Financial services n Environment climate change

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