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State Of Texas Water Plan

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  • Economy has grown at $27 billion per year since 2001The leading crude oil-producing stateThe largest petrochemical producer; hosts nearly 30% of U.S. petroleum refining capacityLargestlivestock producer and 2nd in total U.S. agricultural salesIn 2008, over 70% of U.S. job growth occurred in TexasMore Fortune 500 companies are headquartered in Texas than any other state
  • Transcript

    • 1. State of Texas Water PlanWhat it Costs
      Presented by Senator Kip Averitt
    • 2. Water is the key to one of the world's largest and most robust economies.
    • 3. WATER IS KEY TO OUR ECONOMY
      One of the fastest growing statesin our country. Our population has more than tripled since 1950.
      2060
      46 million
      2010
      25 million
      1950
      7 million
    • 4. WATER IS KEY TO OUR ECONOMY
      Texashas the 2nd largest state economy in the nation.
      $1.8 trillion
      $1.1 trillion
      $1.2 trillion
      Based on Gross Domestic Product
    • 5. WATER IS KEY TO OUR ECONOMY
      Texashas the 11th largest economy in the nation.
    • 6. WATER IS KEY TO OUR ECONOMY
      The Texas Economy
      Has grown at $27 billion per year since 2001
      Leading producer of crude oil and hosts nearly 30% of U.S. petroleum refining capacity
      Ranked 1st in U.S. livestock production, 2nd in total U.S. agricultural sales
      In 2008, over 70% of U.S. job growth occurred in Texas
      More Fortune 500 companies are headquartered in Texas than any other state
    • 7. WATER IS KEY TO OUR ECONOMY
      We are on a collision course.
      By 2060, Texas will have 18% less water and
      twice as many people.
    • 8. Water shortages
      could be catastrophic.
    • 9. Water is Key to our Economy
      By 2060, water supplies will decrease 18 percent and population will double to 46 million.
    • 10. WATER IS KEY TO OUR ECONOMY
      By 2060, water demand will increase 19% and water supplies will decrease 18%.
    • 11. “What you gonna do when
      the well runs dry?” Fats Domino, 1957
    • 12. What are we doing?
      Regional and State Water Planning
      Consensus-driven process led by local communities who know what is best for their economies and environment.
      Planning groups recommend water management strategies designed to provide drought-proof water.
      If implemented, the State Water Plan will ensure that our cities, farms, and industries have enough water in conditions comparable to the worst droughts in recorded history.
    • 13. What are we doing?
      Projected Water Shortages
      We do not have enough water to meet the state’s water demands during a serious drought.
    • 14. What are we doing?
      Water Shortages for Different Water User Groups
      Year 2010
      Year 2060
    • 15. What are we doing?
      Cost of Eliminating State Water Plan
      To implement water strategies, project sponsors will need access to $17 billion of project capital costs through various financing mechanisms.
      Financing State Water Plan Projects
    • 16. What are we doing?
      Current Funding for State Water Plan
      Amount currently authorized for state loans and grant
      For 2008 through 2011, Legislature authorized the TWDB to issue $1.2 billion in loans and grants with a supporting appropriation of $145 million for debt service to fund water infrastructure from the State Water Plan.
    • 17. What are we doing?
      Projects Currently Funded through TWDB Financing
      $195
      $114
      $67
      $79
      $49
      $77
      $35
      State Water Plan Projects Funded as of August 2009 (millions)
    • 18. What are we doing?
      Comparison of 2010-2011 State Water Plan appropriations to other general revenue expenditures (in millions)
    • 19. What are we doing?
      Additional State Water Plan Project Funding (in millions)
    • 20. What are we doing?
      Additional State Water Plan Debt Service (in millions)
    • 21. Cost of complacency?
    • 22. “We are finding out that water is about as valuable as oil, only we can drink water.”
      -Kinney County Extension Agent, 1956
      Cost of complacency?
    • 23. Past Droughts: 1950-1957
      The 1950’s drought lasted from 1950 to 1957 and was the worst in the state’s recorded history.
      Water supplies of some cities were exhausted
      Low water levels in the Guadalupe River crippled 11 power plants
      Purchased water cost more than gasoline in areas
      The state’s population was only 7 million
      Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future
    • 24. Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future
      Droughts Today: North Texas 2006
      In 2006, extreme drought scorched North Texas. Estimated economic impacts were $4.1 billion.
      Extreme drops in water levels at several lakes
      Lake Lavon was 15.5 feet below normal
      Officials considered imposing severe water rationing
    • 25. Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future
      Droughts Today: North Texas 2006
      In 2004, Lake Lavon was nearly full.
    • 26. Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future
      Droughts Today: North Texas 2006
      In 2004, Lake Lavon was nearly full.
      By September 2006, the lake was at 39% of total capacity.
    • 27. Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future
      Droughts Today: Central Texas 2009
      In 2009, a severe drought hit Central Texas.
      By March 2009, 100% of the state was in some form of drought
      By late September 2009, 23% of the state was under severe, extreme, or exceptional drought
    • 28. Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future
      Droughts Today: Central Texas 2009
      By the end of the summer, drought resulted in losses of at least$3.6 billion.
      Canyon Lake hit a record low, and other reservoirs approaching record lows
      Lake Travis was at 37% capacity and Lake Buchanan at 43% capacity
      230 public water systems declared mandatory water restrictions
    • 29. Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future
      Future Droughts
      Not meeting future water demands could cost the state $9.1 billion per year by 2010 and $98.4 billion per year by 2060.
      (in billions)
      (in billions)
      2060
      2060
      2060
      2010
      2010
      2010
    • 30. Placeholder for “Texas crumbling”
      (yvette still working on this)