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Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life
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Electronic Resources Management: A Day in the Life

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Guest lecture for VSU MLIS 7440 (07/09/2012)

Guest lecture for VSU MLIS 7440 (07/09/2012)

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  1. ElectronicResourcesManagementA Day in the LifeGuest lecture for MLIS 7440Valdosta State University07/09/2012Tessa MinchewSystems & Electronic Content LibrarianGeorgia Perimeter Collegehttp://www.flickr.com/photos/kevenlaw/2278566739
  2. The Current Spectrum ofElectronic Resources Software Databases Institutional repositories Websites E-books, e-journals Playaways Podcasts And so on …
  3. E-Resources Are Not … Music CDs Videos on DVD Rule of thumb, e-resources are items that require the use of a computer. (See, AACR2 Appendix D, Electronic Resource)
  4. ERM or ERMS or ERMs??? Electronic Resources Management Principles and practices libraries use to manage information electronic resources Also the software systems that do the managing
  5. What Is in an ERM? Product names & descriptions Vendor contact data Licensing data Payment history Access/admin URLs and login info Renewal data Usage data, or assistance with collecting it And so on …
  6. What Do We Want Outof an ERM? 2010 Survey (Collins & Grogg)  Workflow management  License management  Statistics management  Administrative information storage  Acquisitions functionality  Interoperability (The Holy Grail of ERMs)
  7. A Few of the Players(Proprietary ERMs) Innovative Interfaces: Electronic Resource Management (ERM) Ex Libris: Verde OCLC: Web-scale Management Services EBSCONET: ERM Essentials CO Alliance of Research Libraries: Gold Rush Serials Solutions: 360 Resource Manager Fuller List @  http://www.diigo.com/list/tminchew/erms
  8. A Few of the Players(Open Source ERMs) University of Wisconsin-La Crosse: ERMes University of Notre Dame: CORAL North Carolina State University: E-Matrix Simon Fraser University: CUFTS Fuller List @  http://www.diigo.com/list/tminchew/erms
  9. You’re Not In It Alone E-resources librarianship is not a solitary pursuit. You have to be able to work well with:  IT Dept. (Their support is invaluable.)  Vendors (Sales reps, after sales customer service, technical support)  Other librarians (Your internal patron base)  Patrons (Faculty, students, FoL, community members, etc.)
  10. Where Do Records Come From? OCLC WorldCat Vendor-provided (includes e-resource vendors and cataloging vendors) You! (Original records)
  11. Single Record orSeparate Record? Single record = All manifestations on one record Separate records = One record for each manifestation Your choice will depend on local needs, but separate records are emerging as the national standard.
  12. Other Considerations What/how much are you going to catalog? Who’s responsible for link checking and weeding? To classify or not to classify?  Pros (Aids in collection assessment; Provides access through a call number browse.)  Cons (Added time and effort for an item that rarely requires a shelving device; Confusing to patrons who might look for the resource on the shelf. A shelving prefix or suffix can help.) Standardized local genre headings?
  13. Provider-Neutral Records Provider-Neutral E-Monograph MARC Record Guide  http://www.loc.gov/catdir/pcc/bibco/PN-Guide.pdf Program for Cooperative Cataloging released this policy in late 2009. Required for PCC-member WorldCat cataloging. Optional, but encouraged, for non-PCC members on WorldCat. Records not in compliance will be upgraded or merged. (Starting in January 2010.) Separate record approach.
  14. What You Don’t Need inProvider-Neutral Records No notes and/or added entries regarding providers, file formats, or access restrictions. Do not include (with certain exceptions):  MARC fields: 256, 500/550, 506, 516, 530, 533, 534, 538, 540, 583, 700-730, 773, & 800-830
  15. AACR2 Chapter 9 (ElectronicResources) AACR2 9.0B  Chief source of information  Where you get the data you’re putting in the record  Prescribed sources of information  Where you get the data for particular fields (title, statement of responsibility, edition, etc.)  Information taken from outside prescribed sources must be enclosed in square brackets.
  16. Some Fixed Fields You’llEncounter Leader/06 (Type - Type of Record)  Code for the most significant aspect of the resource. Code "m" is currently used only for computer software (including programs, games, fonts), numeric data, computer-oriented multimedia, online systems or services. a - Language material p - Mixed material t - Manuscript language e - Cartographic material material f - Manuscript cartographic g - Projected medium material k - Two-dimensional c - Printed music nonprojected graphic d - Manuscript music r - Three-dimensional i - Nonmusical sound recording nonprojected graphic j - Musical sound recording o - Kits m - Computer files
  17. More Fixed Fields You’llEncounter Leader/07 (BLvl - Bibliographic Level)  This depends on the e-resource. Some examples:  i - Integrating resource (updating website)  m - Monograph/Item (e-book)  s – Serial (e-journal) Leader/18 (Desc - Descriptive Cataloging Form)  a - AACR2 006 (Additional Material Characteristics)  Include field 006 for computer file, if Leader/6 (Type) is not coded as "m“.
  18. Yes, There Are Even MoreFixed Fields 007 (Physical Description Fixed Field - Electronic Resource)  http://www.oclc.org/bibformats/en/0xx/007comp.shtm 008/21 (SrTp - Type of Continuing Resource)  Left blank for anything other than continuing resources. Use “w” for updating websites that do not fit one of the other codes. 008/23 or 008/29 (Form of Item - Form)  s - Electronic
  19. And On to the Variable Fields! 1XX / 7XX (Name or Uniform Title Added Entries)  Due to diffuse or corporate responsibility on websites, assigning a 1XX to them can be tricky.  For websites, 100 should only be assigned for listed authors/webmasters if the site being cataloged is personal in nature.  110 can be assigned for the official site for a corporate body or government agency.  Personal names and corporate bodies found in the item, and not receiving a 1XX can be traced in a 7XX.
  20. More Variable Fields 245/246 (Title Statement/ Varying Form of Title)  245 usually taken from home page screen for websites, title page for e-books and journals.  GMD (General Material Designation)  $h [electronic resource]  Variant titles can be taken from any place in the resource or cataloger supplied (in square brackets). 260 (Publication, Distribution, Etc.)  With websites, the 260 is taken from any available contact and date information. 300 (Physical Description)  Not used for websites, as they are considered non-physical resources.
  21. More Variable Fields 500 (General Note)  “Always give the source of the title proper.” – AACR2 9.7B3  500 Title from title screen.  “For remote access resources, always give the date on which the resource was viewed for description.” -- AACR2 9.7B22  500 Description based on contents viewed Oct. 3, 2009.  Or you can combine them.  Title from title screen (viewed on Oct. 3, 2009). 538 (System Details Note)  Remember, you won’t have these for provider-neutral records, but if you aren’t taking that approach, they are required if applicable.
  22. More Variable Fields 856 (Electronic Location and Access)  Stop and think about the 2nd indicator (the relationship between the item the 856 links to and the item described by the record).  Blank No information provided  0 Resource (e.g. a website)  1 Version of resource (e.g. record=print book, 856 = e-book)  2 Related resource (e.g. finding aid for archival collection)  8 No display constant generated  At the very least, an 856 has to have $u (Uniform Resource Identifier).
  23. E-Resources Workflow @ GPC 5 campuses involved, so major e-resources purchases (like databases or e-book collections) are committee-based & annual only. Trial selection in Jan./Feb. Trials in March. Decisions in mid-April. Adds/drops take place on July 1. Piloting e-book purchases throughout the year at individual campus level.
  24. E-Resources Workflow @ GPC Statistics compiled monthly & manually using vendor reports & Excel. LibGuides used to relay statistical data, trial information, etc. to the selection committee. ERMes used to manage:  Database information  Vendor data  Admin/stats URLs and logins  Payment history & renewal dates
  25. E-Resources Workflow @ GPC MARC records for e-books  Vendor-supplied  Batch-edited using MarcEdit (http://people.oregonstate.edu/~reeset/marcedit/ html/index.php)  Uploaded to the Voyager catalog using Bulk Import
  26. References Collins, M. & Grogg, J. (2011). Building a better ERM. Library Journal, 136(4), 22-28. Retrieved from http://bit.ly/qqS5fI Hamaker, C. (2011). What’s New in Licensing Electronic Resources for Libraries? Searcher, 19(5), 32-36. Retrieved from Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts (GALILEO).
  27. Questions?
  28. Tessa Minchew Systems & Electronic Content Librarian 678.891.3671 tessa.minchew@gpc.eduhttp://www.diigo.com/list/tminchew/electronic-resources http://www.diigo.com/list/tminchew/erms

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