Literate environment

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Literate environment

  1. 1. Literate Environment Analysis By: Teann Mefford Walden University
  2. 2. Getting to Know Literacy Learners • Take time to get to know each student – What are their interests? – What topics does he or she have background knowledge on? – What types of text do they enjoy reading? – How can you motivate them or spark their interest?
  3. 3. Getting to Know Literacy Learners • Conduct Reading Inventories on each student. – Running Records • Assess accuracy and fluency – Word Lists • Sight word vocabulary • Word Recognition Process – Retellings/Comprehension Questions • Literal and inferential understanding Afflerbach, P. (2012). Understanding and using reading assessment, K–12 (2nd ed). Newark, DE: International Reading Association
  4. 4. Getting to Know Literacy Learners • Determine student attitudes toward reading – ERAS Survey • What are student’s attitudes toward reading? McKenna, M. C., &Kear, D. J. (1990). Measuring attitude toward reading: A new tool for teachers. The Reading Teacher, 43(9), 626--639.
Use the Education Research Complete database, and search using the article's Accession Number: 11080456. Motivation Reader Self-Concepts Reading Interests Attributions for Success/Failure Attitudes toward Reading Afflerbach, P. (2012). Understanding and using reading assessment, K–12 (2nd ed). Newark, DE: International Reading Association
  5. 5. Selecting Texts • Determine a purpose for reading • Consider: • • • • • Student interests Student background knowledge Exposure to a variety of genres Text structure Text Features Tompkins, G. E. (2010). Literacy for the 21st century: A balanced approach (5th ed.). Boston: Allyn& Bacon.
  6. 6. Interactive Perspective • Teach students strategies to help them read accurately, fluently and with comprehension. • Guide students to become METACOGNITIVE with strategy selection. • Work towards the ultimate goal: – “The ultimate goal of the interactive perspective is to teach children how to be literate learners who can navigate the text independently” –Dr. Janice Almasi Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). (2010) Interactive perspective: Strategic processing [Video webcast]. In the beginning reader PreK-3. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps %2Fblackboard%2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3DCourse%26id%3D_4066335_1%26url%3D
  7. 7. Critical and Response Perspectives • Critically examine text from multiple perspectives – Author’s perspective – Reader’s perspective – Character perspective • Challenge Text – What power does this text hold? – Why was it written? Molden, K. (2007). Critical literacy, the right answer for the reading classroom: Strategies to move beyond comprehension for reading improvement. Reading Improvement, 44(1), 50–56.
  8. 8. Critical and Response Perspectives • Respond to text in a variety of meaningful ways • Connect to text • Think deeply about text Tompkins, G. E. (2010). Literacy for the 21st century: A balanced approach (5th ed.). Boston: Allyn& Bacon.
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