Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Introduction To Networks
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Introduction To Networks

161
views

Published on

Overview of Introduction to Networks Using Linux Courseware

Overview of Introduction to Networks Using Linux Courseware

Published in: Technology

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
161
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Introduction To Networks Using Linux NAD710 Linux Lab Series Professor: Tom Mavroidis
  • 2. The Internet
    • Never has there been such dramatic changes to the business world as we have seen in the 1990’s with e-business and the internet.
    • The role played by internet has forced companies to get connected to stay relevant so they may compete in today's fast moving markets.
  • 3. TCP-IP and The Internet Model
    • In the 60’s and 70’s there were many different networks, protocols and implementations.
    • Sharing of information among these dissimilar networks soon became a problem.
    • A common protocol needed to be developed.
  • 4. DARPA
    • The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency funded the exploration of this common protocol.
    • The TCP/IP protocol suite evolved from the ARPANET protocol suite where the fundamental concept of layering was introduced.
  • 5. Backbone Protocol
    • TCP/IP became the backbone protocol of multivendor networks such as ARPANET, NFSNET and other regional networks.
  • 6. Historical Maps of ARPANET
    • Paul Baran in the 1960s envisioned a communications network that would survive a major enemy attacked. The sketch shows three different network topologies described in his RAND Memorandum, "On Distributed Communications: 1. Introduction to Distributed Communications Network" (August 1964). The distributed network structured offered the best survivability.
  • 7.
    • On the battlefield a communications network will sustain damage, so the DOD designed TCP/IP to be robust and automatically recover from any node or phone line failure
  • 8. University of California at Berkeley
    • The protocol suite became popularized when it was integrated into the University of California at Berkeley’s UNIX operating system and became available to the public at a nominal fee.
                                                                                                                                                                         
  • 9. TCP/IP
    • TCP/IP provides the ability to merge different physical networks using a common suite of functions and interoperability between equipment.
  • 10. OSI Open Systems Interconnect