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Developing Metaliterate Learners:  Transforming Literacy  across Disciplines
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Developing Metaliterate Learners: Transforming Literacy across Disciplines

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This was the opening keynote presentation by Tom Mackey and Trudi Jacobson for the SUNY "Conversations in the Disciplines" one-day conference focused on metaliteracy.

This was the opening keynote presentation by Tom Mackey and Trudi Jacobson for the SUNY "Conversations in the Disciplines" one-day conference focused on metaliteracy.

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  • TrudiThrilled to be doing a collaborative keynote, embodies our work, thank you for inviting usHope you will be as excitedRemind you about Twitter
  • TomThis is our visual model to explain Metaliteracy (pause)We see this as a flexible, circular model that builds on information literacy with new technologies and competencies (pause)Metaliteracy expands information literacy to include the ability to produce, share, and collaborate in open learning and social media environments (pause)Metaliteracy also includes a central focus on metacognition, or the ability to think about one’s thinking.Today’s learner moves through these spheres from any direction rather than a traditional linear manner
  • Tom
  • “…and were more likely to say they would choose the same institution if they were to start over again.”Reflective learning strategies were more frequently used by students who were older, enrolled part-time, or taking all their coursework online, and were associated with higher self-reported college grades. Also: online students spent more hours per week preparing for class and on assigned reading compared to students taking no courses online. They also reported more total pages of assigned writing, and a larger percentage said their courses were highly challenging. However, students taking all of their courses online were significantly less engaged in collaborative learning.
  • According to the latest PISA survey, the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment
  • New hires developed adaptive strategies based on social interaction with peers (p. 3)
  • According to the latest PISA survey, the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment
  • Tom
  • From 2012 Paris OER Declaration: Emphasizing that the term Open Educational Resources (OER) was coined at UNESCO’s 2002 Forum on Open Courseware and designates “teaching, learning and research materials in any medium, digital or otherwise, that reside in the public domain or have been released under an open license that permits no-cost access, use, adaptation and redistribution by others with no or limited restrictions. Open licensing is built within the existing framework of intellectual property rights as defined by relevant international conventions and respects the authorship of the work”;
  • Trudi
  • Trudi
  • .
  • TomThis is our visual model to explain Metaliteracy (pause)We see this as a flexible, circular model that builds on information literacy with new technologies and competencies (pause)Metaliteracy expands information literacy to include the ability to produce, share, and collaborate in open learning and social media environments (pause)Metaliteracy also includes a central focus on metacognition, or the ability to think about one’s thinking.Today’s learner moves through these spheres from any direction rather than a traditional linear manner
  • Tom
  • Tom
  • TomTo be metaliterate requires one to understand existing literacy strengths and areas for improvement, and to make decisions about one’s learning.
  • Tom: Need to be on this slide by 10:50
  • TomThis is our visual model to explain Metaliteracy (pause)We see this as a flexible, circular model that builds on information literacy with new technologies and competencies (pause)Metaliteracy expands information literacy to include the ability to produce, share, and collaborate in open learning and social media environments (pause)Metaliteracy also includes a central focus on metacognition, or the ability to think about one’s thinking.Today’s learner moves through these spheres from any direction rather than a traditional linear manner
  • Trudi
  • TrudiI am sure a number of you are familiar with the ACRL IL Standards. Given their date of conception, it is not surprising that many of the key Web 2.0-related components we will be talking about this morningarenot included. Indeed, an ACRL task force, which I am co-chairing, has been formed to update the standards (and I quote in part from the charge) “to reflect current thinking on such things as the creation and dissemination of knowledge and the changing global higher education and learning environment”
  • FT:The value of information does not correspond to its packaging or “wrapper”: for example, some blogs may provide the highest quality information, while others do notAlso mixes signals students may be receivingUser Feedback:just as information production and publication has been democratized, so too has critiquing information. No longer does one have to be an expert to be able to share one’s opinion widely. Plus constantly changingContext:information appears as discrete units, no longer tethered to once-recognizable cohesive entities, this issue has become increasingly obvious. Need to understand & contextualize the info,Eval Dynamic: fluidity info environment requires critical assessment abilities on a variety of fronts, from recognizing the value of less formal methods of communication, to understanding how to synthesize and reconcile conflicting information or viewpoints that may shift before one’s eyes, to determining how to separate opinion from fact. Not new, but more nuanced. And new layer: now possible for individuals to actively engage in conversations
  • TrudiOriginal: can now create and share—important to be able to do so effectively, using appropriate venues and formatsPrivacy, etc: importance has become magnified in today’s de-centered information environment. Thoughtful reflection is needed, but this only happens when people are aware of these issues and have gained the knowledge and critical thinking perspective to tackle such complex concernsShare: abillity to reach global audience brings responsibility differs greatly from the traditional situation of producing information for small, very localized group of readers. must understand: most appropriate ways share content,particularized nature of various venues, the rights issues, and the continuing responsibilities authorship on this scale entails.
  • Threshold concepts: transformative (shift in perspective), integrative, irreversible, troublesome (where students often get stuck) and bounded (help define the boundaries of a particular discipline)Given the weight of these concepts, and the need for time and space to understand them, the 50-minute one-shot session won’t work (or it needs supports such as flipped classroom learning beforehand, reinforcement after: needs partnerships between library faculty and discipline faculty
  • Transformative—cause the learner to experience a shift in perspective;Integrative—bring together separate concepts (often identified as learning objectives) into a unified whole;Irreversible—once grasped, cannot be un-grasped;Bounded—may help define the boundaries of a particular discipline, are perhaps unique to the discipline;Troublesome—usually difficult or counterintuitive ideas that can cause students to hit a roadblock in their learning.
  • TrudiThe information literacy course I am going to briefly describe has both in-person and online sections. I teach only in-person ones, though there is a great deal of overlap with what is happening in the oniinesecitons.In this course, I try to incorporate the metaliteracy learning objectives in a number of waysStudents, working in teams, create their own information sources, research guides, using a website. Let me add that most haven’t actually ever created a website. I don’t teach them how to do it, either. They learn together.Not only do they create the website, which provides citations for and critical annotations of resources on a topic, they each have to create their own information source using a web applicationThis source is supposed to fill in gaps in the information that they have found, and might take the form of a short movie, or a timeline about their topic, or a Prezi presentationIn this source they have created, they often address the issue of visual literacy, and how that information has a different impact than traditional text. They often question their abilities and knowledge, not feeling they are qualified to add to the conversation about the topic, but end up feeling rather empowered and proud.
  • Trudi: probably will substitute a new oneWill show full site here: http://mediapolitics.weebly.com/index.htmlHere is the landing page of one team’s website. This team of 5 students created this entire resource. I should mention that this course is only 14 hours long, and the students do all the work on the website in classGo through what they put together here
  • Tom
  • Tom
  • These figures from November 4 email

Developing Metaliterate Learners:  Transforming Literacy  across Disciplines Developing Metaliterate Learners: Transforming Literacy across Disciplines Presentation Transcript

  • Developing Metaliterate Learners: Transforming Literacy across Disciplines #metaliteracy Tom Mackey & Trudi Jacobson A SUNY Conversation in the Disciplines Friday, December 13, 2013 Center for Distance Learning Empire State College, Saratoga Springs 1
  • Word cloud of “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy” at Wordle.net. 2
  • Mackey and Jacobson (2014) Metaliteracy manuscript Figure by Roger Lipera 3
  • SETTING THE CONTEXT 4
  • 2013 “First-year students who participated in at least one high-impact practice (learning community, service-learning, or research with a faculty member) reported greater gains in their knowledge, skills, and personal development, were more satisfied with their entire educational experience... ” http://nsse.iub.edu/NSSE_2013_Results/pdf/NSSE_AR_2013_Press_Release.pdf 5
  • 2013 “…nearly all students (96%) used some form of technology in their courses during the school year with the most frequent being mobile devices (smartphones, tablets, etc.), collaborative editing software (Wikis, Google Docs, etc.), and electronic textbooks (p. 23).” http://nsse.iub.edu/NSSE_2013_Results/pdf/NSSE_2013_Annual_Results.pdf#page=10 6
  • 2013 “Both learning with technology and courses that improved the understanding and use of technology had a positive association with all four academic challenge engagement indicators for first-year students, including Higher-Order Learning, Reflective & Integrative Learning, and Learning Strategies (p.23).” http://nsse.iub.edu/NSSE_2013_Results/pdf/NSSE_2013_Annual_Results.pdf#page=10 7
  • Project Information Literacy: “The basic online search skills new college graduates bring with them are attractive enough to help them get hired (p. 3). “How College Graduates Solve Information Problems Once They Join the Workplace” 8 http://projectinfolit.org/pdfs/PIL_fall2012_workplaceStudy_FullReport_Revised.pdf
  • Project Information Literacy: “Yet, employers found that once on the job, these educated young workers seemed tethered to their computers. They failed to incorporate more fundamental, low-tech research methods that are as essential as ever in the contemporary workplace” (p. 3). “How College Graduates Solve Information Problems Once They Join the Workplace” 9 http://projectinfolit.org/pdfs/PIL_fall2012_workplaceStudy_FullReport_Revised.pdf
  • Project Information Literacy: “Competencies Employers Say they Need—But College Hires Rarely Demonstrate” 1. Engaging team members during the research process 2. Retrieving information using a variety of formats 3. Finding patterns and making connections 4. Taking a deep dive into the “information reservoir” “Ordered from most discussed to least discussed competencies; n = 23 interview participants” (p. 12) “How College Graduates Solve Information Problems Once They Join the Workplace” 10 http://projectinfolit.org/pdfs/PIL_fall2012_workplaceStudy_FullReport_Revised.pdf
  • CHANGING ENVIRONMENTS 11
  • “What, if anything, can stop the MOOC?” Creative Commons licensed picture at Giulia Forsythe on Flickr. 12
  • George Siemens at MOOC Research Initiative Conference 2013 #MRI13 Alec Couros: https://twitter.com/courosa/status/408248664738377729/photo/1 13
  • 2012 Paris OER Declaration “Bridge the digital divide by developing adequate infrastructure, in particular, affordable broadband connectivity, widespread mobile technology and reliable electrical power supply.” “Improve media and information literacy and encourage the development and use of OER in open standard digital formats.” http://www.unesco.org/new/fileadmin/MULTIMEDIA/HQ/CI/CI/pdf/ Events/Paris%20OER%20Declaration_01.pdf 14
  • “Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy” Research Survey • Technology infrastructure has improved • Respondents familiar with related literacies • Traditional information literacy elements are covered, along with sharing information • More than half incorporate collaboration • Not enough time to teach related literacies • Some respondents are limited by constraints of one-shot library sessions N=361 From Metaliteracy manuscript (Mackey/Jacobson, 2014) 15
  • SUNY INNOVATIVE INSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY GRANT (IITG) 16
  • Grant Goals • Develop robust conversations between librarians and faculty members • Develop metaliteracy learning objectives • Investigate a badge system for metaliteracy competencies for SUNY students (and others, we hope) • Develop or provide access to OERs related to metaliteracy 17
  • WHAT IS METALITERACY? 18
  • Key Elements of Metaliteracy Produce Collaborate Share Metacognition 19
  • Mackey and Jacobson (2014) Metaliteracy manuscript Figure by Roger Lipera 20
  • • “promotes critical thinking and collaboration in a digital age.” • “comprehensive framework to effectively participate in social media and online communities” • “unified construct that supports the acquisition, production, and sharing of knowledge in collaborative online communities.” Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy” 21 College & Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78. http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf
  • • “is more than descriptive; it identifies how learners critically evaluate and understand their knowledge as individuals and participants in social learning environments. ” Mackey and Jacobson (2014) Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacies to Empower Learners manuscript 22
  • • “Information literacy is central to this redefinition because information takes many forms online and is produced and communicated through multiple modalities. ” Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy” 23 College & Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78. http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf
  • The meta in metaliteracy 24
  • “…denoting change, transformation, permutation, or substitution…” “…a prefix to technical terms to denote software, data, etc., which operate at a higher level of abstraction.” 25
  • “a prefix placed before a word in order to describe properties about the original word. For example a metafile is a file which contains data about files, metadata is data about data” (Darrel, 2009). 26
  • Metacognition “cognition about cognition or thinking about one’s own thinking…” Metacognition in Learning and Instruction: Theory, Research and Practice, Hope J. Hartman (2002) http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The _Thinker,_Auguste_Rodin.jpg 27
  • “The ability to critically selfassess one’s own competencies and to recognize the need for integrated or expanded literacies in today’s information environment is a metaliteracy.” Mackey and Jacobson (2014) Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacies to Empower Learners (manuscript) Sofonisba Anguissola Self-portrait at the Easel Painting a Devotional Panel, 1556 Metaliteracy is Metacognitive 28
  • “This metacognitive approach challenges a reliance on skills-based information literacy instruction only and shifts the focus to knowledge acquisition in collaboration with others.” Mackey and Jacobson (2014) Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacies to Empower Learners (manuscript) Judith Leyster Self-portrait, 1630 Metaliteracy is Metacognitive 29
  • The Four Domains of Metaliteracy Behavioral Cognitive Meta Affective Metacognitive 30
  • Mackey and Jacobson (2014) Metaliteracy manuscript Figure by Roger Lipera 31
  • METALITERACY IN PRACTICE 32
  • ACRL Standard Definition of Information Literacy (2000) • Determine the extent of information needed • Access the needed information effectively and efficiently • Evaluate information and its sources critically • Incorporate selected information into one’s knowledge base • Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose • Understand the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information, and access and use information ethically and legally http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency.cfm 33
  • Common IL/ML Characteristics among Related Literacies Access Determine Collaborate Use Evaluate Produce Understand Incorporate Share 34
  • METALITERACY LEARNING OBJECTIVES 35
  • Understand Format Type and Delivery Mode Evaluate User Feedback as Active Researcher Create a Context for User-generated Information Evaluate Dynamic Content Critically Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy” College & 36 Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78. http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf
  • Produce Original Content in Multiple Media Formats Understand Personal Privacy, Information Ethics and Intellectual Property Issues Share Information in Participatory Environments Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy” College & 37 Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78. http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf
  • Expanded Metaliteracy Learning Goals Goal 1 • Evaluate content critically, including dynamic, online content that changes and evolves, such as article preprints, blogs, and wikis Goal 2 • Understand personal privacy, information ethics, and intellectual property issues in changing technology environments Goal 3 • Share information and collaborate in a variety of participatory environments Goal 4 • Demonstrate ability to connect learning and research strategies with lifelong learning processes and personal, academic, and professional goals http://metaliteracy.org/learning-objectives/ 38
  • Metaliteracy joins Info Literacy at UAlbany New major-based general education learning objectives 2. “Demonstrate the ability to evaluate content, including dynamic, online content if appropriate” 4. “Produce, share, and evaluate information in a variety of participatory environments” 5. “Integrate learning and research strategies with lifelong learning processes and personal, academic, and professional goals” 39
  • Empire State College Learning Goals Information and Digital Media Literacy • Critically access, evaluate, understand, create and share information using a range of collaborative technologies to advance learning, as well as personal and professional development. http://www.esc.edu/media/academic-affairs/College-Level-Learning-Goals-1-20-2012.pdf 40
  • METALITERACY MEETS ACRL 41
  • Draft ACRL Framework Threshold Concepts • Integration into Curriculum Dispositions • Affective • Habits of Mind ML Learning Objectives • Often Correlate with TCs 42
  • Threshold Concepts Hofer, Townsend, and Brunetti describe threshold concepts and their criteria, as based on the work of Jan Meyer and Ray Land: …Threshold concepts are the core ideas and processes in any discipline that define the discipline, but that are so ingrained that they often go unspoken or unrecognized by practitioner. They are the central concepts that we want our students to understand and put into practice, that encourage them to think and act like practitioners themselves. (Hofer, Townsend, and Brunetti, 2012, 38788) 43
  • Threshold Concepts Transformative Integrative Irreversible Bounded Troublesome (Hofer, Townsend, and Brunetti, 2012, 387-88), quoting Meyer and Land 44
  • Sample Threshold Concepts • Scholarship is a Continuing Conversation • Research is a Process of Inquiry • Processes of Information Creation 45
  • PROCESSES OF INFORMATION CREATION With the increasing similarity in the mode of access of a variety of information sources, format is no longer a reliable indicator of the type of information to be found within these sources. The process that went into creating the information is a better indicator. Understanding this principle helps students navigate the information they find online and evaluate it according to the process underlying its creation, as well as its enduring and dynamic characteristics. 46
  • Dispositions: The information literate learner is inclined to seek out markers for information sources that indicate the underlying creation process Knowledge Practices (Abilities): Understand that format and method of access are separate entities Recognize that different creation processes result in the presence of distinct but possibly related attributes Able to identify which information-generating processes best meet particular information needs 47
  • PROCESSES OF INFRMATION CREATION Related Metaliteracy Learning Objectives: • Compare the unique attributes of different information formats (e.g., scholarly article, blog, wiki, online community), and have the ability to use effectively and to cite information for the development of original content. • Produce original content appropriate to specific needs in multiple media formats; transfer knowledge gained to new formats in unpredictable and evolving environments. 48
  • HOW HAS THE STUDENT EXPERIENCE CHANGED? 49
  • Active Metaliterate Engagement Basic IL Course: • Migration of individual paper-based research guide to team-based guide using website • Creation of information: “what information would you have liked to find but didn’t?” • Data visualization/visual literacy component • Learn the technology on their own, as a team • Sense of pride and accomplishment • New skills, altered sense of participation
  • Team Project from Fall 2013
  • 52
  • Badging Progression http://metaliteracy.learningtimes.net 53
  • Master Evaluator Badge 54
  • The Metaliterate Learner Understands the process of creating and sharing information • Recognizes gaps in knowledge • Seeks new knowledge to adjust to challenging situations • Adapts to changing technologies • Continuously self-reflects • Demonstrates empowerment through interaction, communication, and presentation • Reflects on production and participation 55
  • MOOC #metaliteracy
  • Connectivist MOOC 2013 SUNY Empire State College and the University Libraries, University at Albany MOOC #metaliteracy Mackey, Thomas P. and Trudi E. Jacobson “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy” College & Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78. http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf
  • 58
  • http://metaliteracy.cdlprojects.com
  • MOOC http://metaliteracy.cdlprojects.com
  • MOOC http://metaliteracy.cdlprojects.com/week1.htm
  • Blackboard Collaborate Session
  • MOOC • • • • 540 registered participants 137 blog registrations 457 Newsletter subscriptions Students from 3 Information Literacy Courses at the University at Albany • 1 Graduate Student at Empire State College Thanks to Carol Yeager for all MOOC data
  • MOOC • Research Survey • “How does the Metaliteracy MOOC support collaborative/connectivist learning?” • 31 questions (mostly Likert Scale and open ended) • Next MOOC idea: International Education (Dr. Val Chukhlomin)
  • Today’s Goals: Discussion and Engagement • Sparking conversation on our campuses • Shared ownership, discipline and library faculty • Suggestions on the learning objectives • Examples of metaliteracy in practice assignments and exercises to highlight on Metaliteracy.org 67
  • QUESTIONS? 68
  • Metaliteracy means that YOU can be a Rock Star! 69
  • Tom Mackey, Ph.D. Dean Center for Distance Learning Empire State College, SUNY Trudi E. Jacobson, M.L.S., M.A. Distinguished Librarian Head, Information Literacy Department University Libraries University at Albany, SUNY 70