Mooc final

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This presentation, "Transliteracy and Metaliteracy: Emerging Literacy Frameworks for Social Media" was part of the CMC11 MOOC offered by SUNY Empire State College, with Thomas P. Mackey, Interim Dean at CDL and Trudi E. Jacobson, Distinguished Librarian at The University at Albany.

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  • Tom introduces
  • Tom and Trudi
  • TomMASS MOCA, North Adams MA
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  • TomUnderstanding Information AccessUnderstanding HyperconnectivityUnderstanding the New Sense of Space
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  • TrudiCreate context: Wikipedia, RSS, GoogleScolar
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  • Mooc final

    1. 1. Transliteracy and Metaliteracy: Emerging Frameworks for Social Media<br />1<br />Week 4<br />Thursday October 6<br />2011<br />http://www.cdlprojects.com/cmc11blog/<br />
    2. 2. Thomas P. Mackey, Ph.D.<br />Interim Dean<br />Center for Distance Learning<br />Empire State College<br />State University of New York<br />Tom.Mackey@esc.edu<br />Trudi E. Jacobson, M.L.S.<br />Distinguished Librarian<br />University Libraries<br />University at Albany<br />State University of New York<br />TJacobson@uamail.albany.edu<br />
    3. 3. Wikipedia, 2011, Rob Matthews<br />“London-based graphic designer and artist Rob Matthews experiments with the translation of objects, images, and ideas from one medium to another. His works display the playful and sometimes precarious or unwieldy results of his investigations into the authenticity of contemporary media.” <br />3<br />Wikipedia, 2011, Rob Matthews, MASS MOCA<br />
    4. 4. Wikipedia, 2011, Rob Matthews<br />“Wikipediadisplays his attempt to give physical form to a web site: 5,000 pages of special features printed from Wikipedia, bound into an absurdly large (but still insufficiently comprehensive) volume.”<br />4<br />Wikipedia, 2011, Rob Matthews, MASS MOCA<br />
    5. 5. ACRL Standard Definition (1989)<br />Determine the extent of information needed <br />Access the needed information effectively and efficiently <br />Evaluate information and its sources critically <br />Incorporate selected information into one’s knowledge base <br />Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose <br />Understand the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information, and access and use information ethically and legally <br />5<br />http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency.cfm<br />
    6. 6. Seven Pillars of Information LiteracyCore Model for Higher Education<br />
    7. 7. Circular nature of Seven Pillars<br />
    8. 8. Conceived of as three dimensional circular building<br />Founded on an individual’s perception of the information landscape at that point<br />An individual can be developing within several pillars independently or simultaneously, though often there is some correspondence<br />SCONUL Working Group on Information Literacy, 2011<br />http://www.sconul.ac.uk/groups/information_literacy/seven_pillars.html<br />Circular nature of Seven Pillars<br />
    9. 9. Today’s multi-faced information environment is acknowledged in each pillar’s skills and competencies <br />IL individuals will expand their horizons, seeking and, after evaluation, using new tools as a part of the process<br />Expansion of Seven Pillars<br />
    10. 10. Present Information Pillar<br />One of the abilities:<br />“Develop a personal profile in the community using appropriate personal networks and digital technologies (e.g. discussion lists, social networking sites, blogs, etc.)”<br />
    11. 11. How we previously presented information:<br />
    12. 12. Collaborative online communities<br />Transient environment<br />Wikis<br />Blogs<br />Virtual worlds<br />Social networking sites<br />Videos <br />Digital images<br />And all the earlier formats<br />Presenting information today<br />
    13. 13. Within social media contexts, <br />Information is no longer a static object that is simply accessed and retrieved (Mackey and Jacobson, 2011, p.62).<br />It is a dynamic entity that is produced and shared collaboratively with such innovative Web 2.0 technologies as Facebook, Twitter, Delicious, Second Life, and YouTube (Mackey and Jacobson, 2011, p. 62). <br />What happened?<br />Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson Reframing Information Literacy as a MetaliteracyColl. res. libr. January 2011 72:62-78 http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.abstract<br />
    14. 14. 14<br />http://www.unesco.org/new/index.php?id=19145&L=0<br />
    15. 15. Horizon Report 2011<br />E-books<br />Mobiles<br />Augmented reality<br />Game-based learning<br />Gesture based computing<br />Learning Analytics<br />PranavMistry, MIT Media Lab <br />'Sixth Sense Device’<br />W3C Mobile Web Initiative<br />15<br />
    16. 16. Mobile Literacy<br />16<br />Understanding Information Access<br />Understanding Hyperconnectivity<br />Understanding the New Sense of Space<br />David Parry. <br />Mobile Perspectives: On Teaching Mobile Literacy<br />EDUCAUSE Review Magazine, Volume 46, Number 2, March/April 2011 <br />http://www.engadget.com/2009/12/03/layar-3-0-reunites-the-beatles-in-3d-augmented-reality/<br />“The Beatles discovery tour”<br />
    17. 17. Horizon Report 2011<br />“Although there is broad consensus that digital media literacyis vitally important for today’s students, what skills constitute digital literacy are still not well- defined nor universally taught.” <br />17<br />
    18. 18. Horizon Report 2011<br />“Teacher preparation programs are beginning to include courses related to digital media literacy, and universities are beginning to fold these literacy skills into coursework for students, but progress continues to be slow.” <br />18<br />
    19. 19. http://acrlvislitstandards.wordpress.com/<br />19<br />
    20. 20. Visual Literacy<br />“The importance of images and visual media in contemporary culture is changing what it means to be literate in the 21st century.”<br />ACRL Visual Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education<br />Draft 9/19/2011<br />http://acrlvislitstandards.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/acrlvislitstandards_draft_20110919.pdf<br />
    21. 21. ACRL Visual LiteracyCompetency Standards<br />Unique issues<br />Critically interact with visual content<br />View<br />Use<br />Produce<br />"Towards A Periodic Table of Visualization Methods for Management"Lengler R., Eppler M. (2007). Towards A Periodic Table of Visualization Methods for Management. IASTED Proceedings of the Conference on Graphics and Visualization in Engineering (GVE 2007), Clearwater, Florida, USA.<br />
    22. 22. Visual Literacy<br />http://heyjude.wordpress.com/2011/02/15/visual-literacy-competency-standards/<br />http://heyjude.wordpress.com/2011/02/15/visual-literacy-competency-standards/<br />
    23. 23. Visual Literacy Standards<br />Based on the ACRL’s Information Literacy Competency Standards<br />Provide tools for educators<br />Establish an intellectual framework and structure to facilitate skill development<br />Articulate observable learning outcomes that can be taught and assessed<br />
    24. 24. Data Visualization<br />24<br />http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/visualizations/<br />
    25. 25. Which would you prefer?<br />Data<br />Visualization<br />25<br />Information is Beautiful Blog Oct 2, 2009 http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/2009/who-rules-the-social-web/<br />
    26. 26. Questions?<br />Next section: Transliteracy and Metaliteracy<br />26<br />
    27. 27. 27<br />“Both metaliteracy and transliteracychallenge traditional skills-based concepts of information literacy by recognizing the role of emerging technologies, suggesting that information technology is a central component of students’ learning.”<br />“Connectivism: Learning Theory and Pedagogical Practice for Networked Information Landscapes”<br />Michelle Kathleen Dunaway<br />Reference Services Review Vol. 39 Iss: 4<br />
    28. 28. 28<br />“Metaliteracy and transliteracy are frameworks for understanding information literacy that emphasize the importance of communities, connections, information networks, and information technologies;”<br />“Connectivism: Learning Theory and Pedagogical Practice for Networked Information Landscapes”<br />Michelle Kathleen Dunaway<br />Reference Services Review Vol. 39 Iss: 4<br />
    29. 29. 29<br />“…these concepts are central to the principles of the theory of connectivism, which postulates that communities, connections, information networks, and information technologies are central to the learning process.”<br />“Connectivism: Learning Theory and Pedagogical Practice for Networked Information Landscapes”<br />Michelle Kathleen Dunaway<br />Reference Services Review Vol. 39 Iss: 4<br />
    30. 30. T R A N S L I T E R A C Y<br />30<br />
    31. 31. Transliteracy Research Group<br />“Transliteracyis the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and film, to digital social networks.”<br />31<br />http://nlabnetworks.typepad.com/transliteracy/<br />
    32. 32. “Research in the Technological, Social, and Cultural Practices of Online Reading”<br />Established 2005<br />Interdisciplinary research team in humanities, social sciences, and engineering<br />University of California, Santa Barbara<br />32<br />http://transliteracies.english.ucsb.edu/category/research-project<br />
    33. 33. Transliterate<br />“to write or print a letter or word using the closest corresponding letters of a different alphabet or language.”<br />33<br />http://crln.acrl.org/content/71/10/532.full<br />
    34. 34. Transliteracy<br />“mapping meaning across different media and not with developing particular literacies about various media.” <br />34<br />http://crln.acrl.org/content/71/10/532.full<br />
    35. 35. Transliteracy<br />“It is not about learning text literacy and visual literacy and digital literacy in isolation from one another but about the interaction among all these literacies.” <br />35<br />http://crln.acrl.org/content/71/10/532.full<br />
    36. 36. M E T A L I T E R A C Y<br />36<br />
    37. 37. Metaliteracy<br />“promotes critical thinking and collaboration in a digital age, providing a comprehensive framework to effectively participate in social media and online communities. ” <br />37<br />Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson Reframing Information Literacy as a MetaliteracyColl. res. libr. January 2011 72:62-78 http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.abstract<br />
    38. 38. Metaliteracy<br />“Information literacy is central to this redefinition because information takes many forms online and is produced and communicated through multiple modalities. ” <br />38<br />Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson Reframing Information Literacy as a MetaliteracyColl. res. libr. January 2011 72:62-78 http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.abstract<br />
    39. 39. 39<br />Figure rendered<br /> by Roger Lipera<br />Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson Reframing Information Literacy as a MetaliteracyColl. res. libr. January 2011 72:62-78 http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.abstract<br />
    40. 40. Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson Reframing Information Literacy as a MetaliteracyColl. res. libr. January 2011 72:62-78 http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.abstract<br />40<br />
    41. 41. 41<br />
    42. 42. Questions?<br />Next section: Metaliteracy in Practice<br />42<br />
    43. 43. Metaliteracy in Practice<br />Understand Format Type and Delivery Mode<br />Evaluate User Feedback as Active Researcher<br />Create a Context for User-generated Information<br />Evaluate Dynamic Content Critically<br />43<br />Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson Reframing Information Literacy as a MetaliteracyColl. res. libr. January 2011 72:62-78 http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.abstract<br />
    44. 44. Metaliteracy in Practice<br />Produce Original Content in Multiple Media Formats<br />Understand Personal Privacy, Information Ethics and Intellectual Property Issues<br />Share Information in Participatory Environments<br />44<br />Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson Reframing Information Literacy as a MetaliteracyColl. res. libr. January 2011 72:62-78 http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.abstract<br />
    45. 45. 45<br />
    46. 46. Digital Storytelling Process<br />46<br />Course Context<br />Readings<br />D.S. Rubric<br />Virtual Field Trips<br />Discussion<br />Feedback<br />
    47. 47. Critical thinking through production<br />Develop several digital narratives with Web 2.0 :<br />Wordle (visual story icebreaker)<br />WordPress blog (fictional, personal, or documentary style)<br />Animoto (your story in a multimedia format)<br />Open choice (Artifacts project)<br />VoiceThread (“If I were….. I would…”)<br />Twitter (Collaborative story)<br />47<br />
    48. 48. e-Portfolios<br />
    49. 49. Metaliteracy Information Literacy Course<br />Effect on basic information literacy course<br />Less focus on traditional information formats<br />New segment: data visualization/visual literacy<br />Exploration & creation of web-based tools<br />Student resistance or discomfort<br />Continued emphasis on information evaluation<br />Need for advanced course <br />Focus entirely on emerging information formats<br />Immersion into participant-generated information<br />
    50. 50. Final project basic IL course<br />2009<br />Paper-based research guide created by individual<br />9 traditional sources (book, reference book, 3 articles, 2 websites, primary source, gov’t document, image, or video)<br />Need to find excellent websites<br />2011<br />Wiki-based information guide created by team<br />5 traditional sources<br />Student-created content using a social media tool (Prezi, Dippity, XtraNormal, etc.), further developed in team<br />Need to find website providing misinformation <br />50<br />
    51. 51. Questions?<br />In closing<br />51<br />
    52. 52. Thomas P. Mackey, Ph.D.<br />Interim Dean<br />Center for Distance Learning<br />Empire State College<br />State University of New York<br />Tom.Mackey@esc.edu<br />Trudi E. Jacobson, M.L.S.<br />Distinguished Librarian<br />University Libraries<br />University at Albany<br />State University of New York<br />TJacobson@uamail.albany.edu<br />

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