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Belarus final
 

Belarus final

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  • Trudi and Tom intro
  • Trudi and Tom intro
  • TrudiLong the standard for American librarians, but far too detailedCommittee now looking at radical revisions to incorporate much of what we’ll be discussing today (presumably)
  • Tom
  • Tom
  • Tom
  • Tom
  • Tom
  • Tom
  • TomShould have about 20 minutes left of half-hour speaking time
  • Trudi
  • Trudi
  • TrudiTo be metaliterate requires one to understand existing literacy strengths and areas for improvement, and to make decisions about one’s learning.
  • Trudi
  • Tom
  • Tom
  • Tom
  • Trudi Create context: Wikipedia, RSS, GoogleScolar
  • Trudi
  • Trudi
  • Trudi
  • Trudihttp://mediapolitics.weebly.com/index.html
  • Tom

Belarus final Belarus final Presentation Transcript

  • Reframing Information Literacy as aTrudi E. Jacobson, M.L.S Thomas P. Mackey, Ph.D. Distinguished Librarian Dean University Libraries Center for Distance Learning University at Albany Empire State College SUNY SUNY 1
  • Reframing Information Literacy as a Part of a year-long project “Introduction of TransliteracyCourses at Belarusian Universities through University Libraries” run by the Belarusian State University (BSU) Fundamental Library with a support of the US Embassy. 2
  • ACRL Standard Definition (1989) • Determine the extent of information needed • Access the needed information effectively and efficiently • Evaluate information and its sources critically • Incorporate selected information into one’s knowledge base • Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose • Understand the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information, and access and use information ethically and legallyhttp://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency.cfm 3
  • “Participatory cultureshifts the focus of literacyfrom one of individualexpression to communityinvolvement” (p. xiii).Confronting the Challengesof Participatory CultureMedia Education for the 21st CenturyHenry Jenkins2009 4
  • “The new literacies almostall involve social skillsdeveloped throughcollaboration andnetworking.” (p. xiii).Confronting the Challengesof Participatory CultureMedia Education for the 21st CenturyHenry Jenkins2009 5
  • Media and Information Literacy (MIL)“Information and media literacy enablespeople to interpret and make informedjudgments as users of information andmedia, as well as to become skillfulcreators and producers of informationand media messages in their own right.”http://portal.unesco.org/ci/en/ev.php-URL_ID=15886&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html 6
  • 7
  • TRANSLITERACY 8
  • Transliteracy Research Group“Transliteracy is the ability toread, write and interact across a rangeof platforms, tools and media fromsigning and orality throughhandwriting, print, TV, radio andfilm, to digital social networks.” http://nlabnetworks.typepad.com/transliteracy/ 9
  • TRANSLITERACY “It is not about learning text literacy and visual literacy and digital literacy in isolation from one another but about the interaction among all these literacies.”Tom Ipri. 2010. “Introducing transliteracy What does it mean to academiclibraries?”College & Research Libraries http://crln.acrl.org/content/71/10/532.full 10
  • “promotes critical thinking and collaboration in a digital age, providing a comprehensive framework to effectively participate in social media and online communities. ”Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson “Reframing Information Literacy as aMetaliteracy” College & Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78.http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf 11
  • “Information literacy is central to this redefinition because information takes many forms online and is produced and communicated through multiple modalities. ”Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson “Reframing Information Literacy as aMetaliteracy” College & Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78.http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf 12
  • “The ability to critically self-assess one’sown competencies and to recognize theneed for integrated or expanded literaciesin today’s information environment is ametaliteracy.”Mackey and Jacobson (2013)Metaliteracy: Reframing Information Literacy for a Social Media AgemanuscriptMetaliteracy is Metacognitive 13
  • “This metacognitive approach challenges areliance on skills-based information literacyinstruction only and shifts the focus toknowledge acquisition in collaboration withothers.”Mackey and Jacobson (2013)Metaliteracy: Reframing Information Literacy for a Social Media AgemanuscriptMetaliteracy is Metacognitive 14
  • Mackey and Jacobson, 2012Figure by Roger Lipera 15
  • “Both metaliteracy and transliteracychallenge traditional skills-based conceptsof information literacy by recognizing therole of emerging technologies, suggestingthat information technology is a centralcomponent of students’ learning.” “Connectivism: Learning Theory and Pedagogical Practice for Networked Information Landscapes” Michelle Kathleen Dunaway Reference Services Review Vol. 39 Iss: 4 16
  • “Metaliteracy and transliteracy areframeworks for understanding informationliteracy that emphasize the importance ofcommunities, connections, informationnetworks, and information technologies;” “Connectivism: Learning Theory and Pedagogical Practice for Networked Information Landscapes” Michelle Kathleen Dunaway Reference Services Review Vol. 39 Iss: 4 17
  • Metaliteracy in Practice • Understand Format Type and Delivery Mode • Evaluate User Feedback as Active Researcher • Create a Context for User-generated Information • Evaluate Dynamic Content CriticallyThomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson “Reframing Information Literacy as aMetaliteracy” College & Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78.http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf 18
  • Metaliteracy in Practice • Produce Original Content in Multiple Media Formats • Understand Personal Privacy, Information Ethics and Intellectual Property Issues • Share Information in Participatory EnvironmentsThomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson “Reframing Information Literacy as aMetaliteracy” College & Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78.http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf 19
  • Metaliteracy Learning Objectives Four main categories: 1. Behavioral 2. Cognitive 3. Affective 4. Metacognitive Please refer to Learning Objectives documentDeveloped as part of a SUNY Innovative Instruction Technology Grant (IITG) andbased on Mackey/Jacobson “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy” College& Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78 http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf 20
  • Active Metaliterate EngagementBasic IL Course: • Actual creation of information • Presentation of that information using a web-based application • Migration of individual paper-based research guide to team-based guide using wiki or website • Addition of data visualization/visual literacy component
  • Team Project from Fall 2012
  • Next MOOC for fall 2013: #L4LLLLiteracies for Lifelong Learning (a Metaliteracy MOOC)
  • Thomas P. Mackey, Ph.D. Trudi E. Jacobson, M.L.S Dean Distinguished LibrarianCenter for Distance Learning University Libraries University at AlbanySUNY Empire State College SUNY Tom.Mackey@esc.edu TJacobson@albany.edu