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DLT planning retreat 6-18-12
 

DLT planning retreat 6-18-12

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  • Discuss difference between procedural norms and performance-based norms
  • Print copies of “The Last Day” and have them on each table.
  • Discuss
  • 5 minutesThe focus of PLC work is for teams to focus on processing the four questions that guide PLC work:What do we want our students to know?How will we know they are learning?How will we respond when they don't learn?How will we respond when they do learn?
  • Create a few find someone who…questions
  • Discuss
  • The timeline for monitoring the learning (getting at impact and results)The processes you will use for monitoring learning (i.e., reflections on learning, reflections for action, student learning, etc.)

DLT planning retreat 6-18-12 DLT planning retreat 6-18-12 Presentation Transcript

  • Our Schools will…Empower Learning, Energize Achievement, Embrace Community— Each Student Real-World-Ready District Leadership Team Planning Retreat June 18-19, 2012
  • Welcome to DLT Summer 2012!“It ain’t no picnic—just lots of great learning and collaboration”• Instructional Coaches• New DLT Members• ECFE/ABE• Cluster Staff Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Procedural Norms • If you need to check messages, breaks will be providedTechnology • If you need to document our learning, then laptops and iPads can be used Hand Up • When you see a hand raised, wrap up your conversation and ready for further direction, clarification • While breaks will be provided, feel free to use the facilities Breaks when needed • Respect the time allotted for breaks so that we can keep our agenda moving forward Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Procedural & Performance-Based Norms: What’s the Difference?Procedural norms refer to the general expectations and behaviors of a team.Performance-based norms refer to the focus of the team work—focus onlearning, collaboration, and results—i.e., core instruction and data. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • The Last Day• At your table, discuss the following questions: – How does the poem reflect the feelings and experiences that your students had this past year? – What vision or hopes do you have for how and what your students feel and experience next year? Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • The Last Day• Join a colleague from a different site and introduce and/or greet one another…and then… – Share one of the great things that happened last year at your site or in your program. – When prompted, join a colleague from a different site and share a hope that you have for your students next year (don’t forget to introduce and/or greet one another). Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Essential Learning Outcomes for DLT1. Deepen understanding of expectations for core instruction and system of interventions2. Align expectations for core instruction and system of interventions to action plans for SIP3. Clarify expectations for developing, implementing, and monitoring SIP4. Examine data options for updating/creating your current reality5. Determine how PD and CT time are used to support our district’s focus on core instruction and system of interventions6. Develop protocols for documenting and reporting work from SIP and CTs Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • What’s Your Goal?• At your table, briefly discuss your goals as you reflect on the focus of our learning for the next two days. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • The Continuous Improvement Cycle……is the heart of being a results oriented learningorganization. The cycle is an ongoing process focused ondetermining specific measurable outcomes aligned to theDistrict Strategic Goals. On an established cycle (usually anannual cycle), outcomes are established based upon a needsassessment, evaluation procedures and action plans aredetermined, plans are implemented, and the work isassessed/measured. The cycle is continuous and revolutionsaround the cycle often overlap. M. Schmoker Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • The School Improvement Plan Framework Current Reality (Needs Assessment) Student Achievement Goals Core System of Culture and Community Instruction Interventions Climate Engagement Action Plan Action Plan Action Plan Action Plan Systems of Culture and Community Core Instruction Interventions Climate Engagement PD Plan PD Plan PD Plan PD Plan
  • Four Focus Questions for Work of Collaborative Teams • What do we want our students toQ1 know, understand, and be able to do? • How will we know they have learned it?Q2 • How will we respond when they don’t learn it?Q3 • How will we respond when they already know it?Q4
  • Work of TLTWhere We Have Been Where We Are Going• Developing curriculum for K- • Continue K-12 math, 7-12 12 math, 7-12 science, 7-12 science, 7-12 ELA, and 7-12 ELA, and 7-12 social studies social studies• Defining expectations for K-6 • Refocus Pre-K-12 literacy reading and math • Structure district interventionists (system of collaborative teams to focus interventions) on core instruction• Focusing district PD on ELO • Continue developing system development/identification of interventions and• Exploring common assessment enrichments (K-12, Tiers 1, development 2, and 3, G/T, TAT) Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Alignment of Effort District MissionDistrict Mission and Vision and Vision District and District and Building Building Leadership Leadership Collaborative Collaborative Teams Teams Classroom Classroom Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Core Instruction Defined…• Core instruction involves – The identification of essential learning outcomes for the grade level and/or course(s) taught – The development of units of instruction, guided by essential learning outcomes and standards and benchmarks – The development of a continuum of assessments aligned with the essential learning outcomes, skills, knowledge, and key academic vocabulary – The identification and/or development of classroom-based interventions and enrichments – The identification of research-based instructional strategies to deliver instruction Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Core Instruction Connected ELOs and Learning START HERE! Targets Instructional Units of Strategies Instruction ENGAGE IN CONTINUAL REFINEMENT Instructional Continuum of Interventions Assessments Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Core Instruction: Essential Questions• How can the expectations for core instruction clarify our understanding and guide our work in relation to… – District curriculum development? – District professional development? – District collaborative teams? – Building PD? – Collaborative teams? Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • From Standards to Learning Targets • Use state or national standards to identify essential learning outcomes that have been prioritized andStandards grouped into units of instruction • Identify what the most essential learning outcomes are that students must learn—at that grade level or in that ELOs course • Name what you want students to learn—what they need to KNOW, UNDERSTAND, and DO (KUDOs) for each of theLearning Targets ELOs Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Essential Learning Outcomes Are…• The indicators, by grade level, course, or content area, that all students will have access to regardless of their building or classroom assignment• The top priorities in a grade level, course, or content area that students need to know, understand, and do• The concepts that provide focus to the curriculum—defining a guaranteed, viable curriculum• The framework that guides collaborative instructional planning both horizontally and vertically Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Learning Targets Are…• The specific knowledge, understanding, and/or skills and academic vocabulary and academic skills based on the ELOs• The statements that provide clear direction for planning assessments and instruction (daily lessons)• The skills and knowledge required to demonstrate deeper understanding—gets to ELOs• The opportunity to communicate the cognitive demand (depth and use of knowledge)• The basis for developing “I Can” statements Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • ELO vs. Learning TargetELO for Math Learning Target• Students can add, subtract, • I can add and subtract multiply, and divide rational fractions. numbers—fractions, decimals, and integers— • Note: the learning target including both positive and was written as an “I Can” negative numbers statement—using student- friendly language. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Turn and Talk• At your table, discuss the difference and the need for both ELOs and learning targets.• When prompted, discuss the following two questions: – How can we use PD time to clarify ELOs and identify learning targets? – How can we reinforce the use of ELOs and learning targets during CT time? Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • BREAK!Be Back in 5 Minutes! Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • On Using Standards to Guide Practice… “I always approach the standards with my students in mind. I try to come up with a lesson that I think will be interesting for students. Then I’ll sit down and say, which standards am I covering, which should I be covering that I’m not covering? I see part of my job as trying to get the kids that aren’t interested to be interested. The whole point is to help the kids, that’s the whole reason I do it. You have to continue to try new things, to be comfortable with what you’re doing, and to try to reach as many kids as possible. That’s the sole purpose of what I do. I’ll do it any way I can.” —Steve Bodnar, High School English Teacher
  • A Learning Progression…• Is the step-by-step building blocks students are presumed to need in order to successfully attain a more specific academic, curricular skill.• Serves as the “backdrop against which teacher and students can determine when to collect evidence about student learning.”• Helps with the development of an assessment map—communicating the need for ongoing, formative assessments. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Clarifying the Learning Progression Embed understanding of literary Explain how the devices in a use of the selected poem literary devices to analytically clarifies the synthesize the meaning of the poem’s theme Define literary poem—to and document devices and identify the the theme’s identify their theme from a relevance to use in selected selected poem. our world. poems. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Clarifying the Learning Progression• Study the verbs in the ELOs and learning targets to articulate a learning progression for students. – Where do you want students to be (Think with the end in mind)? – Where do they need to start? – What supports will they need along the way?• Use the learning progression to communicate the scale or range (increasing rigor or depth of knowledge) of expectations for students. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Teaching Up for Excellence• Refer to the article, “Teach Up for Excellence” as a critical reference for determining how we communicate learning targets and how we approach developing assessment options.• Use the variety of Bloom’s taxonomy resources to support the development of learning targets and a learning progression. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Developing “I Can” Statements• “I Can” statements can help teachers clarify their expectations for students by writing learning targets in student-friendly language.• “I Can” statements help students understand what is expected of them.• See the sample on DNA as an option for translating teacher expectations into student- friendly expectations. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • SUPU• Stand UP and Pair UP with someone from a different site to discuss what a learning progression is. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • PUPU• Pairs UP and PAIR UP…your partner and you will join another pair.• Each person gets one minute to summarize their understanding of a learning progression.• After the four minutes have passed, discuss the HOW and WHY of a learning progression. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Table Talk• Back at your tables… – Discuss how you can use PD time to support the development and/or refinement of a learning progression. – Discuss how you can structure CT time to include collaborative processing of a learning progression. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • What are the implications…• Given our efforts to identify and/or develop… • ELOs • Learning Targets • Learning Progressions • “I Can” Statements – …what PD do you want/need for your BLT? – …what PD do you want/need for your building?• Generate a list of PD needs for your building/program. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • For Tomorrow… (No, we are not finished for the day!)• Read the article, “Teach Up for Excellence.”• Read the introductory page, any 2 of the 7 principles, and the last part of the article.• Be prepared to discuss at least 2 of the 7 principles.• Think implications for performance-based norms and/or use of CT and PD time. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • BREAK!Be Back in 5 Minutes! Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Designing Powerful Professional Development for Teachers by Dennis Sparks (from Learning Forward…formerly NSDC) “What teachers know and do influences students’academic success. The need for ongoing professional learning that deepens teachers’ understanding of their content area and expands their instructionalrepertoire is essential to improving student learning. When the content of staff development focusesspecifically on what data about student performance indicate are the areas of greatest need for students,the return on the investment in professional learning is likely to be higher.”
  • Assessment Plan for Units of Instruction Common Common Formative Formative CommonCommon Assessment Assessment SummativePre-Assessment (Benchmark) (Benchmark) (End of Unit) “Informative” Formative Assessments (i.e., check for understanding, inform instructional planning) to determine when students are ready for common formative assessment Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Developing Common Assessments• Develop your common assessments for a unit of instruction in the following sequence: 1. Summative (end-of-unit) • Begin with the end in mind. 2. Pre-Assessment • Use data to proactively plan remediation, differentiation, enrichment, and intervention (Tier 2) 3. Common Formative (benchmark) Assessments • The number of common formative assessments varies for each unit • Assess no more than 3 learning targets for each common formative assessment Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Developing an Assessment Plan (Map)• An assessment plan (map) helps determine: – The appropriate number of assessment questions you want to ask your students. – The number of knowledge, application, analysis, and evaluation questions you will create. – If you have too many questions for your students to respond to and for you to assess. – The instructional context of your students. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Assessment Plan (Map) Template Learning Target Knowledge Application Analysis Evaluation Document the number of questions studentsRecord the learning would need to answer in order to demonstratetargets separately so their learning—for you to check forthat you can understanding.determine whatneeds to be assessed Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Assessment Plan for Units of Instruction Common Common Formative Formative CommonCommon Assessment Assessment SummativePre-Assessment (Benchmark) (Benchmark) (End of Unit) “Informative” Formative Assessments (i.e., check for understanding, inform instructional planning) to determine when students are ready for common formative assessment Pre-assessments facilitate pro-active PRTI planning. Data from pre-assessments can be used to develop remediation, differentiation, and/or enrichment strategies. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Find Someone Who…• Join another colleague with whom you have not visited with yet today and process your understanding of developing common assessments.• When prompted, return to your table. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Common Assessment: At Your Table…• Discuss the implications of our process for developing common assessments with regard to the following: – BLT PD – Building/CT PD – Use of PD time – Use of CT time Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Developing Instructional Interventions“Intervention models are based on theassumption that a school’s core program willalmost exclusively meet the educationalneeds of at least 75% of its students. Aschool that has significantly less than 75% ofits students at or above grade-levelproficiency has a core program problem, notan intervention problem.” —Buffum, Mattos, and Weber
  • Role of Collaborative Teams
  • System of Interventions: Where we’re heading…• Continue clarifying expectations for K-6 math and reading interventionists• Develop data protocols in iCue for documenting support for students receiving interventions• Develop Tier 1 and Tier 2 instructional interventions aligned with units of instruction• Refine data collection and analysis protocols through the ADSIS interventionists (collaborative action research)• Clarify expectations and develop protocols for 7-12 interventionists• Conduct self-study of district G/T program and services• Align protocols and processes for teacher/student assistance teams across our district Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Create a Proactive PRTI Plan: Remediation, Intervention, Enrichment• Approach each ELO and respective learning targets with different mindsets by anticipating… – What strategies and supports could remediation – What differentiation strategies may be needed to support Tier 1 – What enrichments might be available for students who demonstrate an understanding or mastery of the concepts – What Tier 2 interventions strategies may be needed Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Proactive PRTI Planning Form Plan for Plan for Plan for Remediation Intervention Enrichment• Based on the • After initial • After initial prior skills instruction and instruction and needed, how differentiation, intervention, will we what is our what is our determine team’s plan to team’s plan to which students provide provide need additional time additional time remediation and support to and support to before we those students those who begin initial who have not have learned? instruction? learned? Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Remediation, Remediation Strategies differentiation, and enrichment strategies all support Tier 1 ELOs and Enrichment Strategies Learning Differentiation Strategies Targets Tier 2 InterventionsEach Student Real-World-Ready
  • Putting It Together… A variety of assessments (both informative and common) also increase in rigor and complexity. A number of strategies toLearning targets increase remediate, differentiate, in rigor and complexity enrich, and intervene as reflected on the (Tier 2) support and/or learning progression. scale instruction for students. Improved Results for Students Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Proactive PRTI: Table Talk…• Given what you are learning about Tier 1 and Tier 2 instructional interventions… – What PD will be needed for your BLT? – What PD will be needed for your colleagues?• In what ways does the proactive PRTI approach impact the use of… – Building PD time – CT time• When you think about the collaborative process for creating instructional interventions, how will you structure time for the general education, SPED resource teacher, interventionists, enrichment specialists, and ESL teachers to collaborate on the development of a proactive PRTI plan for units of instruction? Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • LUNCH! Please be back and ready to continue our learning in 60 minutes!Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • The School Improvement Plan Framework Current Reality (Needs Assessment) Student Achievement Goals Core System of Culture and Community Instruction Interventions Climate Engagement Action Plan Action Plan Action Plan Action Plan Systems of Culture and Community Core Instruction Interventions Climate Engagement PD Plan PD Plan PD Plan PD Plan
  • Essential Questions for Action & PD Planning• How does the direction from TLT about core instruction and system of interventions impact your planning?• What do the data from your self-assessment on collaboration, learning, and results tell you?• How will collaborative teams use time to deepen their work with core instruction?• How will teams of general education teachers, SPED resource teachers, ESL teachers, interventionists, and enrichment specialists collaborate to develop instructional interventions?• How will PD time be allocated throughout the year to support core instruction and system of interventions? Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • SIP TimelinesDate(s) TaskJune 18-19 1. Draft of Action and PD Plans for Core Instruction, System of Intervention 2. Create Outline for Current RealitySeptember 13 Current Reality Student Achievement Goals Pro-Pay Building GoalOctober or November Board Report(School Board Study Session)September 20 DLT Meetings-Progress Monitoring and SharingDecember 6February 21April 25 Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Action Plan: Components and ImplementationRequired Focus Areas: Required Elements:1. Core Instruction 1. Actions/Strategies2. System of Interventions 2. Evidence of 2012-2013 Focus for3. Climate and Culture Implementation4. Community 3. Evidence of Impact Engagement 4. Resources Required 5. Persons Responsible 6. Tools and Timelines for Progress Monitoring
  • Analyzing Results: Self-Assessment on 3 Big Ideas of Collaborative Team Work• Using the compiled survey results, determine the following in relation to our focus on core instruction and system of interventions: – Which items would provide the greatest impact…think both short term (quick wins) and long term solutions? – Which items reflect the greatest need for your building? – Which items would encounter the least resistance and/or challenge?• Document your thinking in your Google planning doc.
  • Action Plan: Essential Questions• Given what you have learned about core instruction and system of interventions and the analysis of your survey, use the following highlighted questions to create a draft action plan: – What actions or strategies are needed? – What resources will you use? – Who will be responsible? – What will you document as evidence of impact? Of implementation? – What are your timelines and processes for monitoring?• The shaded questions will be part of subsequent learning and planning process.
  • Action Plan: Feedback and Sharing• Form mixed groups from your cluster and share part of your initial action planning.• Be prepared to share what you discovered. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • BREAK!Be Back in 5 Minutes! Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Begin With the Needs of Students“Planning for high-quality professionaldevelopment beginswith the goals ofpromoting studentlearning and improvingstudent achievement.” —D. Reeves
  • Refocus Professional Development“For a time—perhaps a few years—schools anddistricts should devote the lion’s share of theirprofessional development time and resources tocourses and workshops with dull titles like‘Curriculum 101,’ ‘Effective Teaching 101,’‘Literacy 101,’ and ‘PLCs 101.’ In offerings likethese, educators would become thoroughlyacquainted with the evidence that demonstratesthat these structures and practices would havemore effect than all other initiatives combined.” • M. Schmoker Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Refocus Professional Development• What do you think the quote means given what we have been learning and what your team has been documenting?• Join two colleagues from different clusters and share your perspectives about the quote and the implication for moving our district forward. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • PD Action Plans• Access your initial action plans for core instruction and system of interventions.• Create an action plan that details PD to support your site’s work in core instruction and system of interventions. – The specific learning that your site will engage in (think KUDOs—what teachers will “know, understand, and do”) – The timeline for when the learning will occur – The resources required to support your PD – The person(s) responsible• Document your work on team’s Google doc.
  • Action Plan: Feedback and Sharing• Rejoin the mixed groups from your cluster and share part of your initial PD planning.• Be prepared to share what you are planning. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • What Have We Been Learning About?• If you were to share talking points with colleagues from your school or program, what would you share?• Generate a list of key talking points with another table.• Record on chart paper for sharing. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • What Do You Need To Have Happen…• What do you want and/or need to have happen tomorrow?• Generate your needs/wants on post-its and place of parking lot before you leave. Each Student Real-World-Ready
  • Developing Protocols for Collaborative TeamsDeveloping Protocols for Sharing SIPsDrafting a Current Reality Each Student Real-World-Ready