Staff, faculty, and graduate students from various departments in Notre Dames College of Science participatedin Celebrate ...
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Notre Dame at Celebrate Science Indiana!

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Notre Dame at Celebrate Science Indiana!

  1. 1. Staff, faculty, and graduate students from various departments in Notre Dames College of Science participatedin Celebrate Science Indiana (CSI) on October 6th, 2012 at the Indiana State Fairgrounds in Indianapolis, IN.Approximately 500 of the events visitors learned about math, physics, and chemistry at the Notre Dame booth,sponsored by the ND Physics Department. Members of the JINA team were on hand to guide people througha hands-on activity to smash marble nuclei and identify the isotope on the chart of nuclides, learning about radioactive decay in the process. Members of the Chem Demo team were on hand to discuss demonstrations and activities involving nanotechnology. The balloon model of a carbon nanotube was visible from the entire pavilion as it grew throughout the day, eventually stretching nearly the entire length from floor to ceiling. The QuarkNet team presented various facets of the CMS detectorand the recent discovery announcement related to the Higgs boson. Interactive event displays of Higgs events were on display, and participants created and interpreted their own plots using real data from the CMS experiment. Also on display were components of the CMS detector partially designed and constructed by high school teachers and students right here in Indiana. Riverbend Community Math Center provided number circles for children to hop around to explore an unusual type of arithmetic. Children also built colorful bracelets to discover underlying mathematical patterns. Young children practiced counting and number recognition. Lower elementary students discovered a pattern relating to whether the modulus is even or odd. Older students learned how modular arithmetic relates to remainders in division. They also discovered a pattern based on the factors of the numbers involved in the activity.Participants in Celebrate Science Indiana were MichaKilburn, Sarah West, Thomas Loughran, Ken Cecire,Amanda Serenevy, Kate Rueff, Colin McClelland,Kasey Clear, Dany Floisand, and Karen Antonio.

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